2008 Honda Accord EX-L 3.5L V6 Timing Belt Tips for you. - Page 2 - Drive Accord Honda Forums
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post #16 of 64 Old 01-27-2013, 06:36 AM
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I am not looking forward to this at all!! I bought my 08 used with about 60k on it, the people that had it before me appears that took care of it and did the maintence on it regularly- I have my doubts that they did the timing belt on it- 2 things here- how do when my timing belt is about to crap out on me? And secondly I guess I will never know other than looking for documents possibly showing this done- which I haven't found anything yet. I have worked on multiple cars and done mods but I don't think I'm comfortable doing this job myself- I am thinking ill have to bite the bullet on this repair- I drive normally and sometimes accelerate when I feel the need to. I've got 78k now- I don't think I should go much longer ?


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post #17 of 64 Old 01-27-2013, 07:03 AM
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You should be quite safe to wait for 100,000 miles or 7 years, whichever come first, or you can be proactive and get it done early, as one of my friend very aptly said:

"You would rather change the timing belt 30,000 miles early than one mile late"

BTW, there is really no easy way to tell if a timing belt is about to fail, you would have to take some covers off before you can even see the timing belt, so unless you have had coolant or oil leak issues which containminated the timing belt, you should be safe to assume Honda's recommendation of 100,000 miles or 7 years.

BTW, I was willing to do the job myself since I've done 3 timing belt changes in the past by myself on Honda/Acura DOHC engines, and bought the parts etc., but at the end could not bust open the crankshaft pully bolt loose with several different 1/2" drive 500 ft/lb pnuematic impact guns, so I took the car and the parts to a friend's shop specializing in Hondas to get this work done, no hassle for me and good value for the labor charges I paid so that I'm not busting up my knuckles and worry about the coolant gushing out when the water pump is removed, plus all the critical alignment of the timing belt and camshafts.


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post #18 of 64 Old 01-27-2013, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by 04AccordCpe View Post
I am not looking forward to this at all!! I bought my 08 used with about 60k on it, the people that had it before me appears that took care of it and did the maintence on it regularly- I have my doubts that they did the timing belt on it- 2 things here- how do when my timing belt is about to crap out on me? And secondly I guess I will never know other than looking for documents possibly showing this done- which I haven't found anything yet. I have worked on multiple cars and done mods but I don't think I'm comfortable doing this job myself- I am thinking ill have to bite the bullet on this repair- I drive normally and sometimes accelerate when I feel the need to. I've got 78k now- I don't think I should go much longer ?

You do not need to change it now. If it makes you feel more comfortable you can change it at 90k, but you really can wait until the 105k recommendation.

Also, there is a code on the MM that will show when its time for a belt change. Our 8th gens have an MM code, B4. It's in the owners manual under the MM chart.

So you can change it at 90k to make you feel comfortable, or wait for the MM code B4 to show, at which time should be around 105k.

I changed the belt on my Prelude twice. The first time I changed it at 80k when the recommendation was 90k. The belt was still in excellent condition, but you would not know it until you took everything apart.

The next time I changed it at 90k.

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post #19 of 64 Old 01-28-2013, 07:46 AM
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Originally Posted by 04AccordCpe View Post
I am not looking forward to this at all!! I bought my 08 used with about 60k on it, the people that had it before me appears that took care of it and did the maintence on it regularly- I have my doubts that they did the timing belt on it- 2 things here- how do when my timing belt is about to crap out on me? And secondly I guess I will never know other than looking for documents possibly showing this done- which I haven't found anything yet. I have worked on multiple cars and done mods but I don't think I'm comfortable doing this job myself- I am thinking ill have to bite the bullet on this repair- I drive normally and sometimes accelerate when I feel the need to. I've got 78k now- I don't think I should go much longer ?
I am in similar boat but mine has done, but mine is at 67k. So looks like somewhere between 90k-100k is a godo time to change the timing Belt?

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post #20 of 64 Old 03-04-2013, 06:24 AM
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Why would they have done the timing belt ?????????? It hasn't called for it yet ?

Steve

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Originally Posted by 04AccordCpe View Post
I am not looking forward to this at all!! I bought my 08 used with about 60k on it, the people that had it before me appears that took care of it and did the maintence on it regularly- I have my doubts that they did the timing belt on it- 2 things here- how do when my timing belt is about to crap out on me? And secondly I guess I will never know other than looking for documents possibly showing this done- which I haven't found anything yet. I have worked on multiple cars and done mods but I don't think I'm comfortable doing this job myself- I am thinking ill have to bite the bullet on this repair- I drive normally and sometimes accelerate when I feel the need to. I've got 78k now- I don't think I should go much longer ?

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post #21 of 64 Old 03-04-2013, 01:00 PM
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I am in similar boat but mine has done, but mine is at 67k. So looks like somewhere between 90k-100k is a godo time to change the timing Belt?
Again, as I said in my previous post, you will get a reminder code in your MM display. B4. When you see that, it's time to change the belt.

It's all in your owners manual.

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post #22 of 64 Old 03-12-2013, 08:24 PM
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Why would they have done the timing belt ?????????? It hasn't called for it yet ?

Steve
Not sure Steve- I was thinking the timing belt was due around 60k, sorry I'm not use to these timing belts- I come from the domestic V8s and my last car was the 4cyl 7th gen.

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post #23 of 64 Old 03-13-2013, 02:22 PM
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Again, as I said in my previous post, you will get a reminder code in your MM display. B4. When you see that, it's time to change the belt.

It's all in your owners manual.
Thanks, This helps

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post #24 of 64 Old 08-14-2013, 05:01 AM
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My previous DD was a 99 Acura RL 3.5. Acura quoted me $2,600 to do the timing belt, water pump and the 100k tune-up. Luckly I found a local shop that did all of it for $1,300. About 8 months later my son ran it into a telephone pole...it was a total loss.
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post #25 of 64 Old 09-04-2013, 08:47 AM
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Success! A few tips / tricks & notes

Firstly, major kudos to the contributors here. If you’re like me, the biggest challenge with any major car repair is getting past the “what if I can’t handle it” fear. As a casual knuckle buster, this is the first time I’ve worked on this engine. Here are a few tips / notes I can offer that may save the next guy some time & frustration:

1) Heed War Wagon’s recommended tool notes regarding the harmonic balancer! I’ve never seen anything like this in my life. Not only did I shear a ½ drive breaker bar, I also applied a Husky 800ftlbs air impact gun to this bolt and it wouldn’t budge. Penetrating oils? Tried that & failed. Heating up the bolt with a torch? Tried that & failed. Verified the direction of the engine rotation (clockwise from the passenger wheel-well’s perspective), applied a cheater bar to the bolt, pulled the fuel-pump fuse & bumped the ignition several times? Tried that & failed (the cheater bar literally chipped concrete). If you’re going to tackle this project, get the right tools. Don’t make the same mistake I made in thinking I could muscle it off with a ½ breaker bar. Every (wanna-be) mechanic I called looking for a deep-well 19mm x 3/4 drive socket all said the same thing: “Why do you need a ¾ drive? You should be able to get it with a ½ drive,” (emphasis on ‘should’). Wrong! Save yourself the frustration & get a ¾ drive breaker bar, a 20” x ¾ drive extension, and a 6-point, deep-well 19mm x ¾ drive socket (a 12 point will not work – tried that too). I’m sure there are cases where something less worked but if this is your daily driver, chances are, you will not want button the car back up without being able to make the intended maintenance.

Here you can see where I tried to use a 3/4 drive reduced down to 1/2 trying to accommodate the only 19mm deep well socket I had:


Another photo of the sheared adapter:


And here is why you need a deep-well socket:


2) Common sense may dictate this, but by the time I got the bolt loose on the Harmonic balancer, I was so excited that I did not pay attention to the that thin sheetmetal washer in between the harmonic balancer & the crankshaft. Its really more like an escutcheon. The outer circumference of this escutcheon is flared / cupped. The flare faces out. As War Wagon noted, if you install it in with the flare facing in, I imagine it will eat your new timing belt.

3) Before you remove the old timing belt, take the old spark plugs out & leave the new ones out until you’ve installed & verified timing on the new belt. This way, if you miss your marks on the timing, you can rotate the motor without having to fight compression.

4) Also, before you remove the old timing belt, note the positions of the cams & crankshaft relative to Cylinder One TDC (Top Dead Center) marks. I know of some mechanics who disregard these marks assuming that if nothing changes between taking the old off & putting new belt on, timing will be spot on. Maybe I’m too cautious, but working on an interference motor like this, its too risky for my kind. Once you remove the harmonic balancer, you will see the markings on the crankshaft & motor wall for TDC. In my case, the Woodruff Key happened to coincide with the crankshaft mark. I put the harmonic balancer back on and used the special Honda tool to rotate the motor to TDC (clockwise). The cams will match TDC every second full rotation of the crankshaft.

5) I’m one of those idiots who charges ahead and refer to instructions / manuals only after I get stuck. That said, I’m sure there is a precise sequence for routing the new timing belt – nonetheless here is how I did it & got it right the first time.

a. Hand thread the top bolt into the tensioner but leave the lower bolt off until you’ve routed the timing belt. This will give you a little extra slack to work.

b. Start on with the belt on the inside of the tensioner pulley & work your way up to Cam 1 (closest to the firewall). This cam not only has an edge guard, but the head-wall has an obstruction / guide just above the cam with just enough clearance for a fully-seated timing belt.

c. From Cam 1 tightly draw the belt under the water pump, up to Cam 2, down & inside the pulley guide & finishing on the crankshaft. A third or forth hand is extremely helpful, but if you doing this by yourself, you can use desk / office binder clips to keep the belt on the cams.

d. All of the timing belt slack must be between 9 o’clock of the crankshaft an 9 o’clock of Cam 1. Once the tensioner is fully installed & engaged, it will absorb all of this slack. You ready for the secret?

e. I like to cheat (when it means I can win). I imagine there is a iron-grip monster out there that can pull the belt taught in between Cam 2 & the crankshaft but I am not one of those guys. The best I could do was pull the timing belt taught enough to match the belt-grooves & crankshaft-splines peak-to-peak. So with the timing belt on everything but the crankshaft, I hand-pressed the harmonic balancer back on & used the special Honda tool to rotate the crankshaft counter-clockwise (away from TDC) by almost a full tooth (minute rotation - maybe 1 – 2 degrees). Then, harmonic balancer back off, I pulled as much slack out of the right side of the belt and pressed it on the crankshaft. This way, once you rotate the crankshaft clockwise back to TDC, it will absorb the remaining slack on the right side of the timing belt before it engages the rest of the assembly.

f. Swing the tensioner up into place, & insert the lower bolt. Remember: once you pull that tensioner retainer pin, its 2200lbs of game-on pressure! If slack is in the wrong place, you’ll have to remove the tensioner entirely, re-set the hydraulic tensioner pin & start over. They make a special tool for that too, but I've heard a C-clamp works just as well(?).

g. Using the harmonic balancer & the special tool, rotate the crankshaft clockwise through two rotations. Verify both cams & crankshaft line up with TDC. If you’re as good as I am, (jk) everything should line up.

6) I decided to install an Unorthodox Racing under-drive pulley (Part No. CU6141A) in lieu of the harmonic balancer. Brief instructions accommodate this little wonder but(!) there’s only one small problem: you cannot use that special Honda tool to lock that fancy new pulley and crankshaft while you re-install the bolt. Youtube has a video where the mechanic puts the car in 6th gear, applied the brakes, and was able to lock down the crankshaft. Me? Not so much. My car is an automatic. If I may, I’ll save you the frustration of pointless google and youtube research. You’ll only find this tip here. The only way to lock the motor for the proper tightening sequence is to pull the starter and hold the starter gear on the flex-plate with a pry-bar / crow-bar.

7) Moving on to the re-assembly of the turpentine belt assembly, that tensioner is a real bee-ah for two reasons: 1) the lower pulley is the one that has the pivot bolt and escutcheon / washer. I wasn’t paying attention when these parts fell away from each other. I was left scratching my head and googleing images trying to figure out how that escutcheon is oriented –especially because when I put it together like common sense dictated, the washer & the pulley seemed to interfere with each other. I save you another 20 minutes: it goes in between the bolt and the pulley and, just like the crankshaft washer, the flare faces out! This is what I assumed originally but what I didn’t realize while holding the assembly is that the interferences cease, only after the pivot-bolt is torqued down to spec. 2) If you’re doing this project by yourself, applying enough pressure to the tensioner AND trying to route the serpentine belt? It’s nearly impossible. My trick? I positioned the breaker bar on the tensioner and then used one of those ratcheting furniture straps. I ran the strap from the sway bar around the breaker bar & ratcheted them together. The strap held the breaker-bar & tensioner while I finished routing the serpentine belt.

That’s about it folks. Armed with the right parts & tools, a little courage, and a lot of patience, this project is a fun one! Having no prior experience with this engine, it took me right at 10hrs to complete with the upgraded UR Underdrive Pulley (part no. CU6141A). Now that I am armed with the right tools & experience, I would say I could comfortably complete this project again in half the time.

Two side notes:
1) The old serpentine belt and the timing belt matched each other in signs of wear –next to nil. After 98k miles, they could have easily gone another 20k. The only component that showed noteworthy wear was the timing belt guide pulley. I imagine this component would ultimately led to the failure of the others. As Aviography quoted: "You would rather change the timing belt 30,000 miles early than one mile late."

Here is a photo of the soon-to-fail timing belt guide pulley:


2) The ECU is still adjusting to the new underdrive pulley but so far, I am thrilled with the upgrade. The original harmonic balancer weighs 5lbs 9oz. Unorthodox Racing’s underdrive pulley weighs 11.7 oz. By my calculations that nearly an 87% reduction in spooled / torsional weight! Not to mention the reduction in parasitic drag. It’s not a cheap upgrade but I intend to drive this car until my great-grandchildren mock me for it. You can’t put a value on the rush of more responsive acceleration but you can put a value on the more efficient fuel consumption. So I expect my ROI is about another timing belt project away. ☺ Best of luck!

Here is a photo of the UR underdrive pulley compared to the OEM harmonic balancer:
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post #26 of 64 Old 09-04-2013, 09:53 AM
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My 2009 V6 Accord almost has 42,000 miles. How often do you have to put a new timing belt on?
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post #27 of 64 Old 09-04-2013, 10:09 AM
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The first timing belt service is due anywhere between 90k & 110k miles. My mechanic friends tell me that subsequent service goes in 60k intervals but I know of quite a few folks who simply do it every 90k. Just remember: You are better off early than late! If the timing belts fails, either scrap the engine or expect to pay well over $2k in specialized valve & head work.
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post #28 of 64 Old 09-04-2013, 05:49 PM
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My 2009 V6 Accord almost has 42,000 miles. How often do you have to put a new timing belt on?
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The first timing belt service is due anywhere between 90k & 110k miles. My mechanic friends tell me that subsequent service goes in 60k intervals but I know of quite a few folks who simply do it every 90k. Just remember: You are better off early than late! If the timing belts fails, either scrap the engine or expect to pay well over $2k in specialized valve & head work.
You both need to go back and re-read this thread and your owners manuals.

Timing belt interval is around 105k, but you will see the letter "B4" in your MM when your timing belt is due for a change.

You can change it at 42k, or 60k, or whenever you want before then. It's your money. But it's not worth it. Heck at 42k the belt is still brand new. Any mechanic telling you to change it before 90k is doing so to take your money, and that's the truth. Our belts will not break before 90k, most likely will not break before 105k or whenever your MM tells you it's due, and probably won't break before 120k. I worked with my Uncle doing the belt on my old Prelude, which I drove much harder than I do my Accord, and at each 90k interval there was EASILY another 20k left on the belt.

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Dec. 1999 - May 2010: 2000 Prelude 5 MT, sold with 220,000 miles and still running great - gone, but not forgotten
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post #29 of 64 Old 12-18-2013, 08:31 AM
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Kudo's to the contributor for the detailed DIY. Good to know.

I was told that most dealer do not change the water pump until the second t-belt change since the OEM radiator fluid contains lubricants to reduce the wear and tear on the seals and bearing.

Has anyone not changed the water pump on the 1st t-belt job (V-6)?

Thanks

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post #30 of 64 Old 12-20-2013, 06:16 AM
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Kudo's to the contributor for the detailed DIY. Good to know.

I was told that most dealer do not change the water pump until the second t-belt change since the OEM radiator fluid contains lubricants to reduce the wear and tear on the seals and bearing.

Has anyone not changed the water pump on the 1st t-belt job (V-6)?

Thanks
The coolant should be changed at this point. If you use genuine Honda coolant there are no worries.


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