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: BBC's Top Gear Magazine's "Best 20 Cars" in their 17-year history...


Osiris_x11
01-28-2010, 01:56 PM
BBC's Top Gear Magazine's "Best 20 Cars" in their 17-year history...


http://www.topgear.com/uk/photos/best_20_cars?imageNo=0

http://img709.imageshack.us/img709/7982/670x377image.jpg (http://img709.imageshack.us/i/670x377image.jpg/)

Best 20 Cars

Last month, Top Gear magazine turned 200 - issues that is. To celebrate, we put together a haphazard ramble through 17 years of the world's shiniest car mag, including the best and worst cars we've ever driven, the greatest journeys and the top jaw-breaking pictures.

And now we're putting them online - starting with this - the 20 cars since '93 that have kept us coming back for more...

20. Caterham Superlight R500 (http://www.topgear.com/uk/james-may/james-may-caterham-R500-2009-04-20)
Any car as entirely absent of practical purpose as this deserves a spot in our hallowed rundown. Caterham has been putting the flies in our teeth for decades, but now, with a 260bhp 2.0-litre engine and six-speed sequential gearbox, it's putting them there at warp speed. No wonder Hammond keeps getting 'em whitened.

19. Ford Escort Cosworth
A homologation special to get Ford into the WRC, the Escort Cosworth instantly became the poster boy for a generation of blue collar petrolheads. Four-wheel drive with a heavy bias towards the rear, turbocharging and a rear wing of CanAm proportions meant it was the definitive answer to every mouth breathing hooligan's prayers. (This would be an inappropriate moment to mention that a certain Jeremy owned one.)

18. Honda Civic Type-R
It may have ridden like a leaf spring cart, but the second-gen Honda Civic Type-R was a special bit of kit. Manically free revving VTEC engine (so good that they kept it for the current car) and a dash mounted gearlever that is guaranteed to make you go all BTCC on the way to Tesco's. Jap genius to keep the Germans on their toes.

17. Fiat Panda (http://www.topgear.com/uk/fiat/panda)
Not everything in our Top 20 is fast. In fact, some of it is Captain Slow sort of fast. James has long extolled the virtues of his own Fiat Panda, one of very few modern cars that evokes the honesty and simplicity of our motoring past. It's cheap, simple and unpretentious, but it's also compact yet capacious and a laugh to drive. Even for him.

16. Lotus Exige (http://www.topgear.com/uk/lotus/exige)
The Elise was a turning point for Lotus, and a bar raising moment for low volume British sports cars. But it is the Series 2 Exige S that makes it onto our list for the sheer drama of the thing: ominous aero package, supercharger whining behind your head, physics bashing levels of grip. Turns every commute into a mini Le Mans.

15. Porsche 911 GT3 RS (http://www.topgear.com/uk/videos/worlds-best-road)
Clarkson used to give Porsche a hard time in TopGear, but when Richard Hammond arrived on the scene, Stuttgart suddenly had a passionate defender. The ultimate evolution of the current 911 is the GT3 RS.

14. Lancia Delta Integrale (http://www.topgear.com/uk/jeremy-clarkson/clarkson-tata-nano-2009-24-06)
Few cars hold so unique a place in our hearts as the Lancia Delta Integrale. From the late Eighties to early Nineties, it won the World Rally Championship a record six times and the wide track, turbo charged road going version (preferably emblazoned in full Martini livery) is as jaw dropping now as it was then.

13. Corvette ZR 1 (http://www.topgear.com/uk/videos/team-america-2-part-1)
The only thing that distracts Americans from building laughable cars is the need to go racing. It happened with the Ford GT, and now it's happened with the Vette. Following repeat wins at Le Mans in the last few years, the 638bhp Corvette ZR 1 will hit 205mph and go round corners. Which is a first.

12. Bugatti Veyron (http://www.topgear.com/uk/jeremy-clarkson/clarkson-veyron-2006-01-01)
The car that got James May to 200mph. And then carried on for another 53mph. It may have taken longer to appear than Chinese Democracy, and cost 899,000 when it finally did, but Mankind needs at least one 987bhp quad turbo 8.0 litre 16 cylinder supercar.

11. Vauxhall Monaro (http://www.topgear.com/uk/videos/sand-blast-2-part1)
The spot that should have been occupied by the 1990 Lotus Carlton instead goes to 2005's Vauxhall Monaro. The Carlton ceased production before we even started, so it's out on a technicality, and it took that long for Luton to produce another car we cared about. And it was still essentially shit. But a 170mph, 6.0-litre V8 for £37k? We'll have a bit of that.

10. Honda NSX-R
The NSX was a massive motoring milestone. It made the West sit up and pay attention to Japanese performance engineering, it made Gordon Murray reassess what made a great supercar when he was designing the McLaren F1, and then it did something truly unthinkable. Somehow it made Honda cool.

The NSX R was a lightened, stiffened run out model with a track focused steering and suspension set up that meant it was almost unbearably hard to drive on the public road . But sometimes a refusal to compromise is what tickles TopGear's fancy. It was also only available in white, which is essential for all proper Japanese supercars.

9. Ferrari F50
Launched to celebrate Ferrari's 50th anniversary in 1995, the F50 was the first open-top road car to hit 200mph. But with an enlarged version of a V12 Formula 1 engine, generating 520bhp against a kerbweight of 1,230kg, and a price tag of £329,000, so it bleeding well should.

8. Fiat 500 (http://www.topgear.com/uk/fiat/500)
A controversial inclusion in TopGear's Top 20, the Fiat 500 actually appeared nearly 40 years before we first popped up in Smith's. But it's allowed in here because we also crowned it the Sexiest Car of All Time back in 2006. The 500 evokes a bygone era of cheap, uncomplicated motoring - full of empty sunlit backstreets, dark glasses and suntanned legs tumbling out of whisper thin miniskirts. What's more, it's a car so comprehensively devoid of dialled in masculinity that to drive one now is the ultimate expression of manliness. Try it. You'll pull faster than Errol Flynn in a knocking shop.

7. Ford S-Max (http://www.topgear.com/uk/ford/s-max)
What Ford did with the S-Max was emancipate a vast, blighted section of the car community who'd been forced into interminably dull family cars by the sudden appearance of offspring. The S-Max looks great and steers, rides and handles with the sort of easy vigour once reserved for hot hatches. Dad is very definitely back.

6. Audi RS2
One of the first and purest incarnations of the whole Q Car phenomenon, the Audi RS2 Avant was a practical family estate with a sideline in slaying supercars. A joint project between Audi and Porsche, who rebuilt and heavily modified the car, the all-wheel-drive RS2 could get out of the blocks faster than most contemporary racing cars. Even today, its road-going performance is on a par with 120,000 Italian exotica - think 0-62mph in 4.8 seconds and a top speed of 162mph - but you can pick up a tidy RS2 for the price of a basic A3.

5. Renault Clio Cup
Atop the frill free French hot hatchery sits the original Clio Cup. Taking the spirit of the life affirming but occasionally life concluding Peugeot 205 GTI, and piling on the precision, poise and absence of lift off oversteer, it gifted affordable, practical performance to the people and two years of cover stories to Evo magazine.

4. McLaren F1 (http://www.topgear.com/uk/videos/veyron-vs-mclaren-f1-part-1)
There's no getting away from the fact that when Gordon Murray set out to end the supercar space race, way back in 1988, he pretty much succeeded. The past 20 years have seen faster cars (one) and better handling ones (only arguably), but none has eclipsed the F1.

3. Aston Martin V12 Vantage (http://www.topgear.com/uk/photos/clarkson-aston-vantage-v12)
The ultimate contemporary Aston, combining the comparative understatement of the V8 Vantage with the 510bhp 6.0-litre V12 from the DBS. Not by any stretch the perfect supercar, but by a long one the best Aston in years. This is everything a handmade British sports car should be.

2. Volkswagen Golf GTI MkV
If you can't quite find the 350k euro required to get your bum in TopGear's all time iconic motor, how about spending a 10th of it on a car that, let's face it, is actually a lot better? The Golf GTI began life as a yuppie plaything, but has evolved into arguably the most complete motoring package on the planet. Performance, practicality, comfort, refinement, and for sensible money. In the real world, this is near enough perfection.

1. Lamborghini Murcielago LP670-4SV
So our cards are on the table. Yes, it's ludicrously expensive. No, you can't really see out of it. Or get into it. Or drive it without the aid of an expert chiropractor. And yes, it's a bit flash and yes, you do have to have it in orange.

The Lamborghini Murcielago has everything a sensible car shouldn't, but everything you wish a sensible car would.

Vixen89
01-28-2010, 01:57 PM
Mm..that NSX of yours Osiris..*drools*

421
01-28-2010, 02:08 PM
weak, how could they not include the Toyota Hilux?

ElectricFuzz
01-28-2010, 02:09 PM
:lmao: Look at the picture of Jeremy Clarkson with the Ford Escort Cosworth.

Osiris_x11
01-28-2010, 02:16 PM
Mm..that NSX of yours Osiris..*drools*That's the ultimate JDM wanton-wish'list icon, the '02+ NSX-R. I'm incredibly surprised Top Gear even chose it, as they never were keen on it ever (too refined / too reliable / too livable / not enough mojo' / etc'). Though, the unarguable best automotive magazine in the world (U.K.'s EVO) chose it as their car-of-the-year a few years ago, so the recognition was there.

weak, how could they not include the Toyota Hilux?No doubt there were some interesting choices, and more-so how some were chosen over others. . .

:lmao: Look at the picture of Jeremy Clarkson with the Ford Escort Cosworth.On another site where the article was mentioned, a reader-comment said, "oooh, sleazy-sex-cool!" (lmfao... :naughty:)

12153
01-29-2010, 10:25 AM
An NSX can park in MY driveway, anytime. It's BETTER than MONEY and/or SEX! :lmao:

Here's what I have in mind...

Danielc409
01-29-2010, 10:34 AM
Best quote of the whole thing:

"Yes, it's ludicrously expensive. No, you can't really see out of it. Or get into it. Or drive it without the aid of an expert chiropractor."

Aceman196
01-29-2010, 05:28 PM
McLaren F1 best super car ever.

GuidoCoupeV6
01-31-2010, 12:39 PM
as a former owner of an '00 gti vr6 I agree to disagree
as they must not be talking about the craftsmanship (mine dam nearly
fell apart after 3 yrs, and don't get me started on the electrical) but I will say the performance was there....

Tuolumne
01-31-2010, 01:51 PM
as a former owner of an '00 gti vr6 I agree to disagree
as they must not be talking about the craftsmanship (mine dam nearly
fell apart after 3 yrs, and don't get me started on the electrical) but I will say the performance was there....

2000 is not a MKV:thmsup:

searich07
01-31-2010, 02:13 PM
Osiris x11, “Last month, Top Gear magazine turned 200 - issues that is. To celebrate, we put together a haphazard ramble through 17 years of the world's shiniest car mag, including the best and worst cars we've ever driven, the greatest journeys and the top jaw-breaking pictures.”

Choices represent opinions on 20 best cars, without listing criteria for selection other than Top Gear is celebrating its 200th issue. Top Choice and numebr one is a Lamborghini Murcielago LP 670-4SVZ can he had for a very high cost and represents very few cars manufactured for owners. It is typical eye candy. Editors fail to mention you also need to purchase a Mechanic when you buy that car, Regards

Richard

GuidoCoupeV6
01-31-2010, 04:03 PM
2000 is not a MKV:thmsup:

Figures someone would point that out, while i knew that wasn't an '00 they were talking about i was merely expressing my opinion on the car itself and what my experience was with it..... Has VW come along way since than I'd like to hope so, but the question still remains weather or not they still hold the title as electrical nightmares :paranoid:

I will say this though, i just saw the 2010 GTI and it looks very nice, inside and out ... :naughty:

Tuolumne
01-31-2010, 11:38 PM
Osiris x11,

Choices represent opinions on 20 best cars, without listing criteria for selection other than Top Gear is celebrating its 200th issue. Top Choice and numebr one is a Lamborghini Murcielago LP 670-4SVZ can he had for a very high cost and represents very few cars manufactured for owners. It is typical eye candy. Editors fail to mention you also need to purchase a Mechanic when you buy that car, Regards

Richard

Oh spare me. And the Passat CC's design is "too exotic"? What are you talking about? It's a Lamborghini, yes, a Lamborghini. Have you ever driven a Lamborghini? Do you have the slightest clue of the development dollars that the VW Group put into completely modernizing the brand with the Murcielago? THey meshed the best of both words - German engineering and reliability with Italian design. I'm sorry, but I can't stand it when one believes every car should be compared to a mass market Honda in every respect. Again, it's a Lamborghini.

Markus
02-01-2010, 05:20 AM
Osiris x11,

Choices represent opinions on 20 best cars, without listing criteria for selection other than Top Gear is celebrating its 200th issue. Top Choice and numebr one is a Lamborghini Murcielago LP 670-4SVZ can he had for a very high cost and represents very few cars manufactured for owners. It is typical eye candy. Editors fail to mention you also need to purchase a Mechanic when you buy that car, Regards

Richard

The bolded part is the problem. Care to provide proof for this outlandish, biased, and unsubstantiated drivel?

searich07
02-01-2010, 12:38 PM
It appears I am accused of being biased, outlandish, and stating unsubstantiated drivel? (Quote Markus)

Reasonable Dealer evidence may show otherwise: Cost of Murciélago LP670-4 Super Veloce base price: $450,000 Sale price $484,000 + Tax $45,980 for total of $529,980 (St Louis & Dallas Dealers quote)

Dealer Expected yearly maintenance (assume 10,000 - 12,500 miles per year with an estimate maintenance cost range $11,250 – 13,250 per year (1) 2500 mile oil & filter change $1,250, (2) 7,500 oil & filter change with maintenance $4,500, (3) 10,000 & 12,000 mile oil & filter change $2,500, and (4) estimated $3,000 -$5,000 in parts and labor per year. (St Louis & Dallas Service Dept. quote)

However DuPont Registry reported from Wall Street Journal Article exotic car maintenance as being quite a bit more:
Veyron maintenance tops $300,000 annually The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the cost to own a Bugatti Veyron will come close to $300,000 annually. Maintenance expenditures are broken down as so - $10,000 for tires replaced at 2,500 mile increments per the manufacture’s suggestion - $60,000 for replacing the wheels after the fourth tire change where the wheels are stress tested for cracks - the other $230,000 is lumped under scheduled maintenance (a whopping £12,866 or $21,033 per visit, easily surpassing the annual maintenance costs of £1680 or $2,746 for a Ferrari Enzo) and insurance for a 40-year-old male with a clean driving record So who can afford such maintenance? Well, Simon Cowell, Ralph Lauren, and David Beckham have been photographed driving Veyrons, word is that VW’s Chief Executive Ferdinand Piëch bought one for his wife, Tom Cruise drove one but probably didn’t buy it after he couldn’t figure out how to open the door, and, of course a man named Andy House drove a Veyron into a lake and supposedly already bought himself a new one. (Source: DuPont Registry)

If a Murciélago SV is ever overtaken while accelerating flat out from 0 to 62 mph, other car is likely to be a Bugatti Veyron, which does same run in 2.5 seconds versus Lamborghini's claim of 3.2 seconds for the SV (stock Murciélago coupe is rated at 3.4 seconds). (Source: DuPont Registry)

Dealers also state that a Ferrari will cost 50-60% more than a Murciélago LP670-4 on a yearly basis, which puts Ferrari annual maintenance in a range of $17,000 - $20,000 per year.(St Louis & Dallas Dealers quotes)

Quote:
Originally Posted by searich07
Osiris x11, Choices represent opinions on 20 best cars, without listing criteria for selection other than Top Gear is celebrating its 200th issue. Top Choice and numebr one is a Lamborghini Murcielago LP 670-4SVZ can he had for a very high cost and represents very few cars manufactured for owners. It is typical eye candy. Editors fail to mention you also need to purchase a Mechanic when you buy that car, Regards Richard

Quote Markus: “The bolded part is the problem. Care to provide proof for this outlandish, biased, and unsubstantiated drivel?”

Quote Tuolumne: “Oh spare me. And the Passat CC's design is "too exotic"? What are you talking about? It's a Lamborghini, yes, a Lamborghini. Have you ever driven a Lamborghini? Do you have the slightest clue of the development dollars that the VW Group put into completely modernizing the brand with the Murcielago? THey meshed the best of both words - German engineering and reliability with Italian design. I'm sorry, but I can't stand it when one believes every car should be compared to a mass market Honda in every respect. Again, it's a Lamborghini.”

Regards

Richard

Tuolumne
02-01-2010, 12:41 PM
What you said is outlandish. You still don't seem to comprehend that a Lamborghini is a Lamborghini. These cars are not built to be maintained by a person who buys a mass market family sedan from Honda. Put it in perspective.

Markus
02-01-2010, 01:44 PM
It appears I am accused of being biased, outlandish, and stating unsubstantiated drivel? (Quote Markus)

Reasonable Dealer evidence may show otherwise:

Dealer Expected yearly maintenance (assume 10,000 - 12,500 miles per year with an estimate maintenance cost range $11,250 – 13,250 per year (1) 2500 mile oil & filter change $1,250, (2) 7,500 oil & filter change with maintenance $4,500, (3) 10,000 & 12,000 mile oil & filter change $2,500, and (4) estimated $3,000 -$5,000 in parts and labor per year. (St Louis & Dallas Service Dept. quote)

However DuPont Registry reported from Wall Street Journal Article exotic car maintenance as being quite a bit more:




Dealers also state that a Ferrari will cost 50-60% more than a Murciélago LP670-4 on a yearly basis, which puts Ferrari annual maintenance in a range of $17,000 - $20,000 per year.(St Louis & Dallas Dealers quotes)

Quote:
Originally Posted by searich07


Quote Markus:

Quote Tuolumne:

Regards

Richard

You've still FAILED to substantiate/demonstrate/prove why the editors should have mentioned that a mechanic needs to be purchased. Or that a mechanic indeed needs to be purchased at all. Until you do, such words are drivel and nothing more. And you know it. It's just another instance of you bashing a car you know little about, just for the sake of bashing.

searich07
02-01-2010, 04:32 PM
True Cost of Exotic Car Ownership

What is true cost of ownership of an exotic car? Exotic ownership cost can vary by a wide range between Ferrari, Porsche, Aston Martin and Lamborghini. When buying an exotic, many factors come to play. True Cost of ownership includes insurance, cost of an oil changes, and maintenance in determining ownership cost.

Ferrari
Most Ferrari owners will agree that maintaining a Ferrari can be one expensive task. One key item to consider is that the older the Ferrari model, the more expensive, the more it is to maintain. A typical oil change on a Ferrari F430 will run you $500, and about $800 for a Ferrari F360 Modena, or $1100 for a Ferrari F355. This typical oil change needs to occur every 5000 miles or once a year, since most owners don’t drive their cars 5000 miles a year. Other typical maintenance items include spark plugs at an average of $3000, belts every 15000 miles at an average of $4000 and finally the mother of all maintenance repairs the clutch which will be about $2500 for a 6 speed transmission and $6500 for the F-1 clutch. That makes the Ferrari one expensive machine to own but remember many owners will tell you that you shouldn’t own one if cost of ownership is something that must be thought of.

Lamborghini
Next up is the Lamborghini line which is divided into two segments, the Gallardo and the Murcielago. Both amazing machines are quite expensive to maintain and Lamborghini cost of ownership is not be taken lightly. Murcielago will run you about $2000 for an oil change, $4000 for plugs and best part $12000 for an E-Gear Clutch. Gallardo on the other hand is more docile and similar to Ferrari 360 Modena at just $400 for an oil change, $2000 for plugs and finally about $3500 for an E-Gear clutch. Lamborghini maintenance ranges heavily based on line you select and should not be taken lightly as cost of new transmission could cost you $50,000 if a replacement is needed and let’s not even talk about the engine failing. Despite using Audi based parts, Lamborghini does a great job at making you pay big bucks for parts so don’t take a chance.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin cost of ownership can be expensive to maintain. Aston Vantage is built off of Ford line, it has relatively easy fixes and most parts are easily accessible for repairs. AM maintenance is quite painless at $200 oil changes, $200 belt changes and a wonderful clutch at $2500. Do not be fooled by fact that these numbers are only typical of Vantage and not DB9 or Vanquish which will cost about $800 for an oil change and about $5000 for an E Gear clutch. Maintenance is quite important on Vanquish as horror stories are heard of transmissions costing upwards of $80,000 if needing replacement.

Porsche
Least expensive and most reliable exotic on planet is Porsche 911 Turbo is most ordinary car to maintain, just about on same level as Mercedes AMG models or BMW M models, cost of ownership of a Porsche 911 Turbo is about $300 for an oil change, $900 for spark plugs and finally about $2000 for a clutch.

Exotics cost more than a payment when you include maintenance, and they need to be maintained properly. True cost of ownership of an exotic car is defined as original cost + annual maintenance costs.. An experienced independent shop that specializes in make and model will save money over dealer especially if car is out of warranty.

2006 911 Porsche Cabriolet
Purchase Price - $83,833.00
Depreciation - $37,264.00
Financing - $12,617.00
Maintenance & Insurance - $5,419.00
Cost to Own - $55,300.00
Cost Per Mile - $3.68

2006 Lamborghini Gallardo
Purchase Price - $206,000.00
Depreciation - $71,000.00
Financing - $21,617.00
Maintenance & Insurance - $10,149.00
Cost to Own - $102,766.00
Cost Per Mile - $6.85

Based on 5k miles per year at 3 years (Source DFW Elite Car Club), Regards

Richard

searich07
02-01-2010, 04:35 PM
Exotic Car Ownership Case History
Only weeks into Ferrari ownership, 30,000-mile service was repeated and front shocks were replaced, for a total of $6,196.57
By Michael Sheehan
Keith Martin’s Sports Car Market

Answering daily phone calls and emails provides a never-ending supply of topics on which to pontificate. The “real-world” cost to drive a late model Ferrari is one of the more frequent questions I’m asked.
I recently sold an unusually well-documented 1998 550 Maranello, S/N 111317, with 36,200 miles to a client in the jet aircraft industry, and comparisons between Ferrari and jet costs inspired this column. Like a private jet that requires three to four hours of maintenance for every hour of flight time, Ferraris are not cheap to own.

FIRST TWO YEARS ALMOST FREE
550 Ferrari S/N 111317 was sold new on March 19, 1998, at $225,000, to a wealthy Santa Monica real estate investor and used for weekend retreats to his ranch in Ojai, a 150-plus-mile round trip. Thanks to an unlimited mileage warranty, the first two years were relatively expense free.

First bite came in August 2000, five months after warranty expired. At 13,637 miles, owner brought car in for a 15,000-mile service, two rear tires, an oil, filter, and coolant change for $2,665.70. Two months later, in October, at 17,220 miles, noisy cam belts and bearings were replaced at no cost (thanks to a warranty extension by Ferrari). Windshield washer reservoir was also replaced for $529.25. A month later, in November, at 17,618 miles, front spoiler and three wheels were refinished because of road-rash, at $1,285. Total for first year out of warranty, and about 4,000 miles: $4,479.95, or $1.12 per mile.

As 2001 rolled around, in January, at 18,124 miles, two ball joints and sway bar bushings were replaced at $253.47, a standard procedure for a heavy, high performance, front-engine car with power steering. Three months later, in April, at 18,998 miles, a coolant leak, new front tires, another repaint of wheels, and a detail added $2,718 to the ongoing maintenance bill.

A few days later, at 19,002 miles, check engine light came on and an O2 sensor was replaced at $261.31. A month later, in late May, at 19,329 miles, dash pod had to come out for an instrument panel repair, at $1,290.18. Five months and 1,289 miles later, in early October, at 20,618 miles, an annual oil and filter service and new rear tires added $2,386.60 to expense column.

$8,988 FOR SECOND YEAR OUT OF WARRANTY
In December 2001, a service at 21,358 miles for dash lights, rattles, and a radiator R & R for coolant leaks closed year out at $2,078.82. Total for second year out of warranty, and another 3,740 miles: $8,988.38, or $2.40 a mile.

In January 2002, at 21,966 miles, owner had battery replaced, new suspension bushings installed, and a wheel alignment for $1,228.35. In March 2002, at 22,956 miles, license plate frame was replaced for $124.99, and in May, at 23,802 miles, power steering pump was replaced and fluids serviced, at $500.95.

Four months and 2,657 miles later, in September, at 25,607 miles, steering box, power steering rack, rear shocks were replaced, and wheels were aligned for $8,641.69. Year 2002 ended at 26,236 miles, with a compression and leak down problem discovered in late December at 30,000-mile service. New cam belts, engine mounts, and a valve job followed, with all 24 valves and valve guides replaced for $7,954.66. Fortunately for owner, Ferrari supplied valves and guides under an extended warranty. Another year, another 4,878 miles, adding up to $18,450.64, or $3.78 a mile.

TOYOTA MONEY: 37 CENTS PER MILE
Ferrari gods were smiling in 2003, with only 672 miles added and one service for hood shocks, in March, at 26,908 miles. Cost of ownership was only $249.38. Little use means no visits to ever-vigilant Ferrari mechanics, who point out problems that need to be resolved. This year cost Toyota money—just 37 cents per mile. Of course, there weren’t many miles driven either.

In 2004, 550 S/N 111317 saw little use, but frequent visits to Ferrari service center, beginning in January, at 31,688 miles, for a seat control switch and wiper blades at $1,366.43. A week later, in early February, at 31,860 miles, sway bar bushings were replaced at $208.63. In late February, at 32,035 miles, handbrake shoes and rear brake rotors were replaced and four new tires were fitted, at $3,365.79. In early March, at 32,122 miles, a coolant leak added $903.21 to annual cost. Another year, another 5,214 miles, another $5,844.06, with cost per mile, $1.12.

In late December 2004, Ferrari 550 S/N 111317 moved on to her second owner, for $90,000, and no service bills were added to year. A real estate investor and self-confessed “Porsche guy,” became second owner who had always wanted a Ferrari and bought 550 simply because he knew car through original owner. Only weeks into Ferrari ownership, in January 2005, at 32,945 miles, a 30,000-mile service was again done, under “while-you’re-at-it” theory, because of oil leaks. The front shocks were also replaced, at $6,196.57. Only weeks later, second owner also had nose repainted, and his 550 “personalized” with front fenders modified for fender shields and calipers redone in yellow, at $7,759.70.

NOT FOR THE TIMID: $10.27 PER MILE
A month later, in March, steering wheel was recovered for $450, and in April windows were tinted and a “clear bra” installed for $935. Only weeks later, owner continued to personalize his 550 with a Tubi Exhaust for $3,155.94. In August, at 34,235 miles, oil hoses and other minor items were replaced, at $3,194.44. Total mileage for second owner: 2,113 miles and $21,691.65. Most of this work was pure pride-of-ownership personalization, but financially timid need not apply, as cost per mile, at $10.27 per mile, was approaching that of an M1 tank.

As 2006 rolled in, our second owner next had a new clutch installed, in January, at 35,625 miles, for $4,852.59. After sitting for six months, second owner decided that he really was a “Porsche guy” at heart. Ferrari 550 was too big for his tastes and so, in August, 550 Ferrari S/N 111317 was picked up from his home and dropped off for an A/C service, at 36,196 miles, for $519.40. Cost of ownership for second owner, for 2006: 1,961 miles at $5,371.99, or $2.73 per mile.

In August 2006, our subject Ferrari 550 was again sold for $90,000, with 36,196 miles, to third owner who was president of a corporate jet maintenance and sales company. During pre-purchase, an oil leak was found, and while estimate was $3,000, final bill was $1,582.58. Third owner appreciated subtle lines and wanted a user-friendly Ferrari that could be driven daily in New York weather and traffic.

A long-time Ferrari owner, he appreciated that virtually all of depreciation was reflected in purchase price and that at 36,000 miles, adding mileage wouldn’t kill value. His last toy was a new Porsche Turbo at $160,000, and while it had been nice to order a car exactly as he wanted, depreciation wasn’t worth thrill when he sold it after three years for $95,000.

Warranty on Ferrari 550 S/N 111317 ran out in March, 2000, at about 13,500 miles. Our subject Ferrari 550 went to third owner in September 2006 at 36,200 miles, so total miles out of warranty was 22,700 miles, with a total spent of $65,760.50, or $2.90 a mile, right at $11,000 a year.

Ferrari ownership is both a lifestyle and a socio-economic statement, just as owning a polo pony is a different venture than keeping a draught horse. As one former owner of S/N 111317 put it, “I spend more than that on crap on eBay every year.” No other statement quite sums up the difference between those who lust for a Ferrari from those who can pay the price of ownership.

MICHAEL SHEEHAN has been a Ferrari broker and race car driver for 30 years.
(Source: Keith Martin’s Sports Car Market) Regards

Richard

Markus
02-01-2010, 05:09 PM
Richard, interesting reading indeed. Thanks. I question some of the 911 Turbo maintenance costs, though. Clutch replacement seems low. I've seen up to $3K for said job. Spark plugs and oil change are too high. Friends have paid, at the dealer, $300 and $80 respectively. Makes me question the validity of the other prices given by DFW Elite, though.


BTW, where's the proof of the requisite purchase of a mechanic? :D

Jecht
02-01-2010, 05:16 PM
Thought this would of been number one?12. Bugatti Veyron
:dunno:. They seem to have it on the show everytime I watch it.

12153
02-01-2010, 06:22 PM
It appears I am accused of being biased, outlandish, and stating unsubstantiated drivel? (Quote Markus)

Reasonable Dealer evidence may show otherwise:

Dealer Expected yearly maintenance (assume 10,000 - 12,500 miles per year with an estimate maintenance cost range $11,250 – 13,250 per year (1) 2500 mile oil & filter change $1,250, (2) 7,500 oil & filter change with maintenance $4,500, (3) 10,000 & 12,000 mile oil & filter change $2,500, and (4) estimated $3,000 -$5,000 in parts and labor per year. (St Louis & Dallas Service Dept. quote)

However DuPont Registry reported from Wall Street Journal Article exotic car maintenance as being quite a bit more.

Dealers also state that a Ferrari will cost 50-60% more than a Murciélago LP670-4 on a yearly basis, which puts Ferrari annual maintenance in a range of $17,000 - $20,000 per year.(St Louis & Dallas Dealers quotes) Regards, Richard

Richard,

Your excellent points are unambiguous, and well-taken. What is abundantly clear to me is that there are others who firmly believe that "form and feel" are absolutely superior to "function and reliability." Were ONLY I RICH enough to indulge said vehicles...with reckless, wanton abandonment. Within the greater society, FEW are so PRIVILEGED...and FOOLISH.

Markus
02-01-2010, 06:38 PM
Richard,

Your excellent points are unambiguous, and well-taken. What is abundantly clear to me is that there are others who firmly believe that "form and feel" are absolutely superior to "function and reliability." Were ONLY I RICH enough to indulge said vehicles...with reckless, wanton abandonment. Within the greater society, FEW are so PRIVILEGED...and FOOLISH.

Get off your high horse. Who are you to call these people foolish?

searich07
02-02-2010, 11:50 AM
A RICH Arab sent his Lamborghini on a 6,500-mile round trip to Britain for a service.
By NEIL SYSON
Published: 31 Jul 2008

£190,000 ($303,100 USD)supercar was put on a scheduled flight from Qatar to Heathrow – then flown BACK after the oil change..

Money was no object as the flight would have cost the owner – thought to be a Sheikh – around £20,000.
The move sparked fury from green campaigners. An airport worker said: “This car doesn’t have a carbon footprint – more of a crater.” Overall cost of sending the Lamborghini to London for the oil change would have cost more than £23,000.

His black-and-gold supercar costs £3,552 to service at an approved dealer – on top of the £20,000 to freight from Qatar to Britain. Murciélago LP640 – driven by Batman in movie The Dark Knight – arrived from the Middle Eastern country on Friday.

It cleared customs and was trucked to specialist mechanics in London for the service. On Monday it was flown back 3,250 miles to the oil-rich state where it was collected by the owner. A cargo handler at Heathrow blasted car’s environmental damage. He said: “It would have been far more efficient to fly mechanics out there.”

And Jenny Evans, of pressure group Plane Stupid, said: “This horrifies me. It is another example of how rich people exploit and pollute the planet because of their money.”
She said the role of the super-wealthy in climate change was not properly recognised – while poor people were rapped for going on holiday.

Friends of the Earth’s transport campaigner Richard Dyer said: “Flying a car thousands of miles for a service is ludicrous when planes are one of the most polluting ways to transport goods. We urge the individual to get their car serviced closer to home.”

But David Price, of Lamborghini Club UK, said: “If an owner wants to service his car in that way, it is his choice.

“I’m not surprised. Thankfully the age of excess in some areas continues.”

Lamborghini UK spokeswoman Juliet Jarvis said there could be “kudos” for a Middle Eastern owner in servicing a car in London. She said the exclusive Italian brand had a network of authorised dealers around the world – and most cars were looked after in the country where they were bought. But she added: “This sort of thing is not unheard of.”

Qatar Airways confirmed it carried the Lamborghini. The cars are popular with celebs including Rod Stewart and David Beckham.
n.syson@the-sun.co.uk

Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1493291.ece#ixzz0ePOzWf7w

Speaking of maintenance costs, did you say $20,000 for an oil change?, Regards

Richard

09^CBP^6MT
02-02-2010, 11:55 AM
I have been lucky enough to drive a Veyron or 2, including the convertible gran sport.:notworthy

09^CBP^6MT
02-02-2010, 12:07 PM
Anyone see top gear last night......veyron VS mclearen f1 in a 1 mile drag race.

searich07
02-02-2010, 12:55 PM
Bugatti Veyron Crash

This supercar which equivalent in power to F1 sports car costs at least $1.5 million. As quickest production car to reach 100 km/h (62 mph) with an estimated time of 2.5 seconds and with top speed of over 400 km/h and W16 engine that has 16 cylinders in 4 banks of 4 cylinders, Bugatti Veyron .
has always been a WOW, especially when you manage to turn one of only 300 available worldwide into a scrap, with car lost control and spun 3 times due to patch of water on rainy condition, and then hit into another vehicle before colliding and wrecking into a tree.

The accident involving Bugatti Veyron occured at 3pm on 4th March on a 40mph stretch of the B375 near Chertsey, Surrey, England, which may set as world most costliest accident on road either to the owner who just took delivery of Bugatti Veyron for a week, or insurance company. If sleek car cannot be repaired and has to be written off as according to eyewitnesses, bits of Bugatti were strewn all over road, front had been virtually ripped off, every panel was damaged and front wheels were pointing in opposite directions, then it will likely produce most expensive scrap in world too, after burnt a large sum of money into hot air.

Best of all, the driver was actually just rented the car for £20,000 a day. With this amount of money, you must be wonder why he doesn’t actually buy one himself. Well, who would use his own car even though it’s to create the first known public accident for the particular model of vehicle? So now we have first accident involving Bugatti Veyron after consumer sales started on public road. It’s really a record breaking accident. (photos in Maroon and Black)

Pelican Insurance

This is one of the saddest, yet most amusing sights we've ever seen. A $1.6 million Bugatti Veyron sitting in a South Texas salt water lagoon, door open, in two feet of nasty, corrosion-inducing muddy water. While sight is sad, how event allegedly transpired is downright hilarious. Owner of the vehicle, traveling through Galveston, Texas to look at some high-end property, was reportedly talking on his cell phone when a low-flying pelican distracted him. Driver swerved to avoid big bird, dropped his cell phone, and in process front passenger tire hit a mud patch then went off road into salt marsh.

A quad-turbo, 16-cylinder engine may be able to get you to 60 mph in under three seconds, but it doesn't work well with mud, so the supercar made a b-line for an adjacent lagoon. The ultra rare Veyron (reportedly one of 15 copies here in the States) was still running after it rested nearly belt-line high in the salt water, as local news affiliate KHOU reported the 1,000+ hp engine "gurgled like an outboard motor for about 15 minutes before it died." It probably would have been a great idea to kill power to the engine (and even shut the door) once the Veyron hit the muck, but hey, what do we know? (photos attached) Regards

Richard

ElectricFuzz
02-02-2010, 01:55 PM
Bugatti Veyron Crash

This supercar which equivalent in power to F1 sports car costs at least $1.5 million. As quickest production car to reach 100 km/h (62 mph) with an estimated time of 2.5 seconds and with top speed of over 400 km/h and W16 engine that has 16 cylinders in 4 banks of 4 cylinders, Bugatti Veyron .
has always been a WOW, especially when you manage to turn one of only 300 available worldwide into a scrap, with car lost control and spun 3 times due to patch of water on rainy condition, and then hit into another vehicle before colliding and wrecking into a tree.

The accident involving Bugatti Veyron occured at 3pm on 4th March on a 40mph stretch of the B375 near Chertsey, Surrey, England, which may set as world most costliest accident on road either to the owner who just took delivery of Bugatti Veyron for a week, or insurance company. If sleek car cannot be repaired and has to be written off as according to eyewitnesses, bits of Bugatti were strewn all over road, front had been virtually ripped off, every panel was damaged and front wheels were pointing in opposite directions, then it will likely produce most expensive scrap in world too, after burnt a large sum of money into hot air.

Best of all, the driver was actually just rented the car for £20,000 a day. With this amount of money, you must be wonder why he doesn’t actually buy one himself. Well, who would use his own car even though it’s to create the first known public accident for the particular model of vehicle? So now we have first accident involving Bugatti Veyron after consumer sales started on public road. It’s really a record breaking accident. (photos in Maroon and Black)

Pelican Insurance

This is one of the saddest, yet most amusing sights we've ever seen. A $1.6 million Bugatti Veyron sitting in a South Texas salt water lagoon, door open, in two feet of nasty, corrosion-inducing muddy water. While sight is sad, how event allegedly transpired is downright hilarious. Owner of the vehicle, traveling through Galveston, Texas to look at some high-end property, was reportedly talking on his cell phone when a low-flying pelican distracted him. Driver swerved to avoid big bird, dropped his cell phone, and in process front passenger tire hit a mud patch then went off road into salt marsh.

A quad-turbo, 16-cylinder engine may be able to get you to 60 mph in under three seconds, but it doesn't work well with mud, so the supercar made a b-line for an adjacent lagoon. The ultra rare Veyron (reportedly one of 15 copies here in the States) was still running after it rested nearly belt-line high in the salt water, as local news affiliate KHOU reported the 1,000+ hp engine "gurgled like an outboard motor for about 15 minutes before it died." It probably would have been a great idea to kill power to the engine (and even shut the door) once the Veyron hit the muck, but hey, what do we know? (photos attached) Regards

Richard

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSkaTcjDIMk