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Discussion Starter #1
Of all the dumb things to love about my '19 sport, I can't fully express the childish joy I get from the sound the electric e-brake makes when I park the car. More often than not, I turn off the motor first before pulling that tab because it sounds cool. With that being said, I have questions about this parking brake and how it compares to handbrakes of generations past.

How does it work? I'm hearing it in the back, so it can't be a cable anymore. Is it a screw/worm gear? Will it start to struggle when my pads are worn thin?

It is officially called a parking brake according to the voice that tells me to set it before starting my car, so can I rely on this brake alone to park my manual car? People give me grief over safety, that it's an emergency brake, but if Honda now calls it a parking brake, is it sufficient for parking without putting the transmission in gear?

Will this complicate or simplify rear brake jobs? I used a socket tool to turn back my piston in my 9th gen, presumably because of the e-brake cable action. Is this still the case, or can I just compress the piston? I guess I'll find out whenever I finally get in there, but I'm only at 3600 miles at the moment.

Last but not least, has anyone figured out a workaround to bypass the need to set the brake before starting? I've tested and confirmed that I can rolling restart after a stall, but I'd still like to work out if I can hill start it with a dead battery, and that doesn't seem possible if I have to set the brake to do it.

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When I first learned to drive a manual, I never parked with the car in gear. After many people telling me and reading about emergency/parking brake failures I started parking the car in gear. Can't hurt for another line of defense in case the brake fails.
 

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The is a motor attached to the rear calipers that turns the piston when you apply the parking brake.

It does make changing the rear pads more involved.You now have to detach the motor and use a Torx drive to retract the piston. The service instructions calls for a special tool that actuates the motor but it's not required.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The is a motor attached to the rear calipers that turns the piston when you apply the parking brake.

It does make changing the rear pads more involved.You now have to detach the motor and use a Torx drive to retract the piston. The service instructions calls for a special tool that actuates the motor but it's not required.
Its too bad there isn't a "service mode" that could cause that motor to fully retract the piston for you. Up until now, I've felt that Hondas are deliberately serviceable to appeal to buyers.
 

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My friend's 2013 Corolla was parked at a convenience store with only the electric parking brake, and he came out of the store to find the car had rolled forward about 30 feet due to the parking brake not engaging somehow. Luckily, only the front bumper was damaged a little from hitting a curb and stopping. Soooo I don't trust electronic parking brakes lol.

Kinda sucks you have to do all that extra work just to change rear brake pads. I wonder if it's more or less annoying than doing drum brakes? :ROFLMAO:

I agree with the sentiment that Hondas used to be serviceable, and now they're kind of leaning away from that (but it's not just Honda doing that)... I'm going the "never buying a newer car" route however, so I won't have to personally worry about it, but it's still not a direction I like seeing cars go in. It's like they're perpetuating ignorance upon car owners by making them even less easy to work on, so people give up trying to DIY/maintain.
 

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My friend's 2013 Corolla was parked at a convenience store with only the electric parking brake, and he came out of the store to find the car had rolled forward about 30 feet due to the parking brake not engaging somehow. Luckily, only the front bumper was damaged a little from hitting a curb and stopping. Soooo I don't trust electronic parking brakes lol.

Kinda sucks you have to do all that extra work just to change rear brake pads. I wonder if it's more or less annoying than doing drum brakes?

I agree with the sentiment that Hondas used to be serviceable, and now they're kind of leaning away from that (but it's not just Honda doing that)... I'm going the "never buying a newer car" route however, so I won't have to personally worry about it, but it's still not a direction I like seeing cars go in. It's like they're perpetuating ignorance upon car owners by making them even less easy to work on, so people give up trying to DIY/maintain.
It is a manual? If it's an automatic of any kind, a locking pin is engaged in the automatic transmission when you put the car in P, so it still shouldn't roll forward if the parking brake fails. If it rolls forward, I would check out the transmission.

If it's a manual, then it will roll forward without a parking brake if you don't put your car in a gear when you are parked, and that's a bad habit. Always put your manual trans in 1 or R when parked as a failsafe.

I have driven cars with electronic parking brakes and they are fine. Never had a problem with engaging them. If you forget to disengage it when you start driving, they also will automatically disengage so it's convenient.

Cable parking brakes have their own issues, like the cable can freeze up, get loose, etc.

Sent from GM1917. Technology!
 

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Last but not least, has anyone figured out a workaround to bypass the need to set the brake before starting? I've tested and confirmed that I can rolling restart after a stall, but I'd still like to work out if I can hill start it with a dead battery, and that doesn't seem possible if I have to set the brake to do it.
If you're asking if the car can be push/bump started, I can say that I've done it a few times in my 2018. From what you've done, it looks like it'll still work on the newer models.

It also depends on what you mean by "dead" battery. As long as the battery has enough juice to power the ECU, fuel delivery system, ignition, and that electric parking brake (if already engaged), then it should work. If the battery puts out enough to power the instrument panel but not enough to turn the starter motor, there still might be a chance of a successful bump start. But if the battery gets to near 100% drained where nothing turns on, you'll most likely need a jump/boost.

Whether or not I leave the car in gear, I've always used the parking brake when parking a car with a manual transmission. Since this is the first time I've owned one without a manual parking brake, I just ended up buying myself a portable battery booster. I really don't know how low the battery can be for the electric parking brake to stop working; but if it does get that low, at the minimum I'd like to have a means for disengaging the parking brake.
 

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I just helped my buddy change his brakes and rotors on a acura ilx with the electronic parking brakes. It wasn't too bad at all. To do all four took us around 3.5 hours.
 
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