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That looks good, I like it
 

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Waiting for it to arrive.
 

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2019 2.0 EXL
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198 Posts
Sprayed 303 on some rubber trim pieces, added a few decals, swapped out my old spare tire with the new matching spare and reorganized my trunk (btw, the 255 spare tire raised the trunk floor height I'm guessing about 2" so I lost some cargo capacity), installed two LED strips in place of the stock trunk light (much brighter now and so far no electrical problems like the other aftermarket LED trunk light I had tried), and drained my catch can.

In case anyone is interested about the catch can collection, here are some pictures - (sorry, I don't have a graduated cylinder, the glass cup shown is slightly larger than a shot glass - about 3" tall and about 2" inner diameter of the mouth):
These two are from 4630 miles (~ 500 miles after initial installation):


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5072



These next two were from about 1000 miles after that:

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5074



And these two were from today (about 1050 miles from the last time):


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5076



I think I will probably wait for 2000 or 2500 miles for the next drain...
 

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2020 Accord Hybrid EX-L
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My hybrid Accord hit 10.26k miles yesterday, though, only after 3 and half months.

I am quite surprised to see oil life remains 15%. Does every Accord have such a long oil life in terms of mileage if mainly doing highway? Now I feel following MM is too aggressive...I’ll do an oil/filter change this weekend with Costco's full synthetic 0W20.

One unrelated question I always have is that, will a vehicle get ‘old’ by a lot of highway mileage within a short time? Say I’d expect to do 35k miles a year, which sounds too much for me. Should I perform any additional maintenance regarding this?
 

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Highway miles are generally considered "kind" to a vehicle, causing less wear and deterioration than city miles.

- Jack
 

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My hybrid Accord hit 10.26k miles yesterday, though, only after 3 and half months.

I am quite surprised to see oil life remains 15%. Does every Accord have such a long oil life in terms of mileage if mainly doing highway? Now I feel following MM is too aggressive...I’ll do an oil/filter change this weekend with Costco's full synthetic 0W20.

One unrelated question I always have is that, will a vehicle get ‘old’ by a lot of highway mileage within a short time? Say I’d expect to do 35k miles a year, which sounds too much for me. Should I perform any additional maintenance regarding this?
Highway miles are definitely better than inner city or even stop light to stop light. Nothing should "pop up" on you.

Follow the maintenance schedules and you should have a 300k mile capable car in your hands
 

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Highway miles are definitely better than inner city or even stop light to stop light. Nothing should "pop up" on you.

Follow the maintenance schedules and you should have a 300k mile capable car in your hands
Yep. I'm pretty sure that the maintenance minder keeps track of the type of driving that you do- and the timing as a way to calculate remaining oil life. My 2019 was bought new about four months ago- has 2000 miles on it- and currently says that oil life is about 45%. My guess is that the car is knows that it was sitting on the lot for a while and adjusted the life of the oil accordingly. :)
 

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Yep. I'm pretty sure that the maintenance minder keeps track of the type of driving that you do- and the timing as a way to calculate remaining oil life. My 2019 was bought new about four months ago- has 2000 miles on it- and currently says that oil life is about 45%. My guess is that the car is knows that it was sitting on the lot for a while and adjusted the life of the oil accordingly. :)
Maintenance Minder does NOT factor time into calculating oil life.

It was brought up here:


It's your driving style. Maybe a lot of short trips, a lot of idling, hard acceleration, etc?
 

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Maintenance Minder does NOT factor time into calculating oil life.

It was brought up here:


It's your driving style. Maybe a lot of short trips, a lot of idling, hard acceleration, etc?
Sorry I disagree and so does my vehicle. When I was driving over 100 miles a day, based on the maintenance minder I was getting about 12k between oil changes. Now that the car has sat more with everything going on, I have only put about 1500 miles on since my last oil change in a three to four month time, yet I'm down to 70% oil life already. Meaning I'm only going to get about 6k maybe 7k this time. That might have been true at the time that was written, but either it's different with hybrids or they implemented it in all vehicle for the 2020my.
 

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Honda said back in Dec. 2019 that "only the 2018 model series Odyssey apples this logic", meaning only the 5th gen Odyssey has a 365-day timer.

The 2019 and 2020 Accord's were out before Dec. 2019 memo was published. Perhaps 2020 Accord's manufactured after Dec. 2019 memo came out had the 365-day timer applied, or your driving habits/style changed.

I doubt the system software Honda has put out this year changed anything to the Maintenance Minder. The system software's just for the entertainment system, right?


523901
 

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I see what it says but i have witnessed this 15% reminder on my car now for the last week, (without change) Im gonna do my oil change this weekend when i have the free time. But yeah, my light came on last monday and its still on reading 15% at this very moment.
 

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Honda said back in Dec. 2019 that "only the 2018 model series Odyssey apples this logic", meaning only the 5th gen Odyssey has a 365-day timer.

The 2019 and 2020 Accord's were out before Dec. 2019 memo was published. Perhaps 2020 Accord's manufactured after Dec. 2019 memo came out had the 365-day timer applied, or your driving habits/style changed.

I doubt the system software Honda has put out this year changed anything to the Maintenance Minder. The system software's just for the entertainment system, right?


View attachment 523901
Like I said the only difference is the amount of time the car has sat idle. There is a major difference in oil life between the two scenarios that should not be the case unless the computer is factoring other variables.
 

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I went ahead and did my oil change after i got off of work yesterday. Saw no point in waiting for the weekend. Only takes me 25 mins to complete. Also rotated my tires too since i had the indication for that as well. Although now that i think about it, i wonder if i needed too since my last oil change i have since taken off my stocks and put on my rims.
 

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2018 2.0t sport with 20k on the odometer and will do 2nd CRC intake/turbo spray/clean. I've had a Mishimoto catch can on the car since +/- 1k miles.

Pretty sure the catch can is worth it because I check it and empty it weekly. Admittedly, each time the can is emptied the quantity is small, but those small amounts add up to carbon build up...probably :). The CRC step hopefully complements the catch can in keeping the tops of the intake valves clean or as free from carbon build up as possible.

Is anyone else using the CRC intake valve/turbo cleaner? If so, what is your experience or opinion?

I went ahead and did my oil change after i got off of work yesterday. Saw no point in waiting for the weekend. Only takes me 25 mins to complete. Also rotated my tires too since i had the indication for that as well. Although now that i think about it, i wonder if i needed too since my last oil change i have since taken off my stocks and put on my rims.
Go through the step of resetting your tire monitor. Had our tires rotated and the next day - in the rain - the monitor lit up... Read the owner's manual and noted the instruction to reset the monitor after any service to the wheels/tires.
 

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Good point out.
 

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2018 2.0t sport with 20k on the odometer and will do 2nd CRC intake/turbo spray/clean. I've had a Mishimoto catch can on the car since +/- 1k miles.

Pretty sure the catch can is worth it because I check it and empty it weekly. Admittedly, each time the can is emptied the quantity is small, but those small amounts add up to carbon build up...probably :). The CRC step hopefully complements the catch can in keeping the tops of the intake valves clean or as free from carbon build up as possible.

Is anyone else using the CRC intake valve/turbo cleaner? If so, what is your experience or opinion?
How do you know it's worth it? Have you compared this to the amount left in the system after a month of the stock system evaporating the excess? The engine, ( and they have been designed liken this for decades with pcv systems) was designed by the engineers to recirculate and burn those excess vapors off. Furthermore the point at which these systems connect do nothing to stop carbon buildup on direct injection engines, since they are connected after the point at which the buildup occurs and in all reality has no impact as to why carbon buildup occurs on direct injection engines in the first place. Basically the reason why this carbon buildup all started coming to attention about 15 years ago is because in search of fuel economy, direct injection started becoming standard. Unfortunately di engines inject fuel directly into the combustion chamber vs the intake. While this is more efficient on many levels, including running cooler and more precise fuel levels, it's the former that results in carbon buildup. Because the fuel is no longer going past the valves, they don't get as hot and therefore doesn't burn off the carbon buildup basically before it even forms. If your vehicle is recirculating that much of its oil than you have a serious problem with your pcv system or compression on your pistons, meaning you have far greater problems. Even with a water meth system running daily you will still get carbon buildup on a di engine (even an aggressively tuned one letting you run 104octane program on 91fuel spraying 425ml/m, of which I have setup numerous cars with hundreds of thousands of miles collectively including my personal one). It's unfortunately an inherent design flaw with a di engine.
I would stick with bg, seafoam, or the liquidmoly ones. I know they work well. The more often you, use them, by directly sucking into the intakenmethod, the cleaner. You want the product going past the valves which is what it isn't doing with a di system.
If you haven't been using a similar product every 10k miles I suggest to start by removing the manifold and physically scrape and clean the valves. After that repeat every 8-10k miles and be done. The more often and sooner you start this procedure the cleaner they will remain if this is something your worried about.
Basically catch cans are snake oil and they piss me off that companies sell and profit from them when a bottle of cleaner once a year is all you need. They work on race cars which is where they originated, because those engines don't have modern emissions systems ect that just add unneeded complexity in a race car. So in their case they give the engine extra mileage because they don't have the systems to properly burn those excess vapors off. If you were running a fully built 2.0t with say a GT3076 or bigger (so about 450-500hp) on this engine I would say sure go with a catch can. Otherwise save the money. The tiny bit of oil you may see when changing your ic hose or something is meaninless. I mean no disrespect honestly, I have more problem with the companies selling and marketing these things than anything else. Just don't forget to close your valve after draining before you start driving again ;)
Edit: forgot to include this little excerpt about di

.
 

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How do you know it's worth it? Have you compared this to the amount left in the system after a month of the stock system evaporating the excess? The engine, ( and they have been designed liken this for decades with pcv systems) was designed by the engineers to recirculate and burn those excess vapors off. Furthermore the point at which these systems connect do nothing to stop carbon buildup on direct injection engines, since they are connected after the point at which the buildup occurs and in all reality has no impact as to why carbon buildup occurs on direct injection engines in the first place. Basically the reason why this carbon buildup all started coming to attention about 15 years ago is because in search of fuel economy, direct injection started becoming standard. Unfortunately di engines inject fuel directly into the combustion chamber vs the intake. While this is more efficient on many levels, including running cooler and more precise fuel levels, it's the former that results in carbon buildup. Because the fuel is no longer going past the valves, they don't get as hot and therefore doesn't burn off the carbon buildup basically before it even forms. If your vehicle is recirculating that much of its oil than you have a serious problem with your pcv system or compression on your pistons, meaning you have far greater problems. Even with a water meth system running daily you will still get carbon buildup on a di engine (even an aggressively tuned one letting you run 104octane program on 91fuel spraying 425ml/m, of which I have setup numerous cars with hundreds of thousands of miles collectively including my personal one). It's unfortunately an inherent design flaw with a di engine.
I would stick with bg, seafoam, or the liquidmoly ones. I know they work well. The more often you, use them, by directly sucking into the intakenmethod, the cleaner. You want the product going past the valves which is what it isn't doing with a di system.
If you haven't been using a similar product every 10k miles I suggest to start by removing the manifold and physically scrape and clean the valves. After that repeat every 8-10k miles and be done. The more often and sooner you start this procedure the cleaner they will remain if this is something your worried about.
Basically catch cans are snake oil and they piss me off that companies sell and profit from them when a bottle of cleaner once a year is all you need. They work on race cars which is where they originated, because those engines don't have modern emissions systems ect that just add unneeded complexity in a race car. So in their case they give the engine extra mileage because they don't have the systems to properly burn those excess vapors off. If you were running a fully built 2.0t with say a GT3076 or bigger (so about 450-500hp) on this engine I would say sure go with a catch can. Otherwise save the money. The tiny bit of oil you may see when changing your ic hose or something is meaninless. I mean no disrespect honestly, I have more problem with the companies selling and marketing these things than anything else. Just don't forget to close your valve after draining before you start driving again ;)
Edit: forgot to include this little excerpt about di

.
Wow! You ask how I "know" and in my post I wrote, "Pretty sure the catch can is worth it..."

After a few minutes of reading I thought to myself, 'self', if the gentleman (excuse me for assuming your gender) can't comment within the context of 'know' and 'pretty sure' I probably don't really need to read anything else. So, I didn't.

But, it would seem that you really did lean into your response so I'll give you a (y)for effort.

I mean no disrespect, either. :)
 

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Wow! You ask how I "know" and in my post I wrote, "Pretty sure the catch can is worth it..."

After a few minutes of reading I thought to myself, 'self', if the gentleman (excuse me for assuming your gender) can't comment within the context of 'know' and 'pretty sure' I probably don't really need to read anything else. So, I didn't.

But, it would seem that you really did lean into your response so I'll give you a (y)for effort.

I mean no disrespect, either. :)
Besides the fact you included no other evidence than "you think" you completely missed the entire point since your sole and only focus you had was simply on the descriptors used vs actual mechanical workings of the devices in question(as you yourself rudely admitted you read nothing of what was posted). I've physically seen countless engines like these disassembled. I have personal cleaned my own valves numerous time. I even provided you with links to the technical knowledge for you to gainso you no longer had to say yourself " well guess I'm pretty sure it's working." So I will rephrase since the gentleman (like you assuming) doesn't even have the common decency to read something before responding:
"I'm pretty sure, as well as know, that catch cans on vehicles like yours are worthless and pretty much a waste of money. They are physically incapable of reducing carbon build up as you say. It's impossible for them to do so
based on how direct injection works. The only thing they do is look pretty and have a very very minor reduction in contaminants that are recirculated."
 

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I have a catch can and if you scroll up you can see some of the results. Now whether or not those results are "significant" or "worth it" is debatable. For me, if I spread out the cost of the catch can over the expected time of ownership (10 years), it's not "that" expensive and FWIW, I'm planning on using cleaner periodically as well.
 
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