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Which tint type is best?

  • Dyed

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Metallic

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Ceramic

    Votes: 14 87.5%
  • Clear UV film

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tint is lame, my car is a fishbowl!

    Votes: 1 6.3%

  • Total voters
    16
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Gearless
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I think 20% is SUV factory tint. 5% is a little dark for parking lots at night but the back up camera helps. I also wouldn't want a reason to get pulled over coming home from the bar after a couple of ginger ales with the gang.
 

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I am having this issue with the back window of my 2018 Touring. Tint brand used was SolarGard 35%. I had the tint done during cold weather in March and had been hopeful that it was a drying/curing issue that would go away... 1.5 months later and it is still a concern.

The other issue I have is the "rainbow effect" when looking out the side windows while wearing my polarized sunglasses. (can't post pix yet as I'm a new member...) This is more of a documented issue if you're up for some reading... revantoptic.com/blog/why-youre-seeing-rainbows-in-car-windows/
 

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I had 3M Crystalline 40 installed on my '18 Accord and have the same issue. Noticeable at night, but like another poster said I'm not using the rear window most of the time so can live with it. The added benefits of the Crystalline are worth it for me.
 

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Tint Issues

So this is the first time tinting a car and I have a couple issues I want to see if other owners have come across.

1) Rear window tint (40%) at night-time: other cars headlights cause lots of distortion along all the defrost lines. I know this is somewhat to be expected but it is more annoying then I thought..... are there tricks to minimize this, or is this what I am stuck with.

2) Windshield tint (70%): I have 2 almost parallel distortion lines about 1" apart that go horizontally across the entire windshield about eye level. The installer is telling me it is imperfections in the glass and that I didn't see them until the tint was applied. Has anyone else noticed this? Worried I am stuck with it as it probably isn't noticeable without the tint and leaving the tint on would just cause finger pointing.

Any advice would be helpful. BTW, I tinted my silver accord 40% all the way around except the windshield did 70% and love the look minus the issues....

Thanks,
Todd
 

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Hi All, does the Accord LX have any factory tint.The reason I am asking is, I want to get 35% tint but if there are already some factory tint, I would get the 40%. The legal limit in VA is 50% for the front, but I got a waiver from dmv because I submitted a note from my eye doctor. So now I can go as low as 35%. Thanks guys.
 

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Hi All, does the Accord LX have any factory tint.The reason I am asking is, I want to get 35% tint but if there are already some factory tint, I would get the 40%. The legal limit in VA is 50% for the front, but I got a waiver from dmv because I submitted a note from my eye doctor. So now I can go as low as 35%. Thanks guys.
All factory glass has a tint level. You have to factor it in to your choice of tint % in order to know if you are legal. I don't know of many who have been pulled over for tint specifically, but it could be cited when being pulled over for other things.

To calculate the actual VLT of the glass with film applied to it, you need to multiply the VLT of the window tint applied by the VLT of the glass. For example, applying a 5% film to glass with an 80% tint to it, you would multiply 5% x 80% = (0.05×0.80)x100 = 4%. So the glass and window tint would have a combined VLT of 4%.
 

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I have 20% all around and %70 on the front windshield. Looks dark but blocks most of the UV rays out. I can still see perfectly fine at night.
Automotive glass already blocks out 99% of UV rays from the factory.

Almost all people do it for looks and don't know the difference between different tint products.
 

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Automotive glass already blocks out 99% of UV rays from the factory.

Almost all people do it for looks and don't know the difference between different tint products.
Do you have a source for this claim? Which type of UV rays are blocked?

People tint their windows for a variety of reasons - heat/glare/IR/UV reduction among a few.
 

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Automotive glass already blocks out 99% of UV rays from the factory.

Almost all people do it for looks and don't know the difference between different tint products.
https://www.autoblog.com/2013/09/06/not-all-car-windows-protect-against-uv-rays/

Not All Car Windows Protect Against UV Rays

Car windows are designed to protect you in an accident. But they won't necessarily protect you from the sun. Automotive glass must meet a host of government standards in the U.S. and elsewhere. It has to let in the maximum amount of light to help drivers see, and it has to shatter into tiny pieces instead of shards that could – and probably would – injure occupants in a crash. But there are no requirements for sun protection. That can vary by vehicle, and even by window within a vehicle.

Windshields offer the most sun protection, according to an executive at Pittsburgh Glass Works in Pennsylvania. His company supplies glass to nearly every major automaker, including Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, General Motors, BMW and Hyundai. By law, windshields must be made of laminated glass, which means they're formed from three parts: two 2.1-millimeter layers of glass separated by a 0.8-millimeter piece of stretchy plastic. The glass is made to break easily if something – the driver's head, for example, or a deer – comes in contact with it. The plastic then stretches to absorb that impact.

The layer of plastic helps windshields absorb nearly all of the sun's ultraviolet rays. Plastic is naturally good at absorbing UV rays, and can be made with extra UV absorbers to protect even more. The Pittsburgh Glass Works exec says windshields absorb 100 percent of UVB rays (which cause sunburn), and around 98 percent of UVA rays. Those UVA rays don't cause sunburn but can do long-term damage to the skin. That built-in protection gives windshields a sun protection factor - or SPF - of 50 or more, the equivalent of some of the strongest sunscreens.

Sunroofs, too, often contain UV-absorbing technology that can block around 90 percent of UV rays. That's partly to keep the car cool as well as protect occupants from sun exposure. But side and rear windows are a different story, and their SPF can vary a lot depending on the vehicle.

Side windows are usually made from cheaper tempered glass, which is around 4 millimeters thick and doesn't include a layer of plastic. Tempered glass is designed to shatter into tiny pieces in order to protect the occupants in a crash. But unless they're tinted for privacy, side windows usually absorb only 65 percent of UV rays. That gives them an SPF of around 16, the same as some of the lowest grades of sunscreen. That may be all right for people who don't do a lot of driving. But several studies indicate a link between skin cancer and sun exposure while driving, especially for truck drivers or those with long commutes.

In 2007, researchers at the St. Louis University School of Medicine found that in a group of 898 skin cancer patients, 53 percent of the cancers occurred on the left side. Those who spent more hours per week driving had a higher chance of getting a left-side skin cancer. Also, a statistically significant number of the cancers were on areas that are exposed while driving, including the head, neck, arms and hands.

Some automakers are opting for more expensive, higher-SPF glass, not only to protect the car's occupants but also to cool down their cars. Heat from the sun can force the car's air conditioning to work harder, which lowers the vehicle's fuel economy. South Korean automakers Hyundai and Kia use window glass with an SPF between 44 and 48 in those vehicles they assemble in the U.S. And Toyota switched to laminated glass for the front windows of the Avalon sedan, both to improve UV protection and to offer added insulation from wind noise.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-uv-windows/car-door-windows-dont-stop-uv-rays-idUSKCN0Y32WI

Car door windows don't stop UV rays

(Reuters Health) - Car windows don’t protect against harmful sun exposure, so it might be a good idea to wear sunglasses and sun block even while driving, a new study suggests.

While windshields blocked the vast majority of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun, car door windows offered varying levels of protection from the rays that are tied to cataracts and skin aging.

“Some cars were as low as 50 percent blockage,” said researcher Dr. Brian Boxer Wachler of the Boxer Wachler Vision Institute in Beverly Hill, California.

“Even cars that came with factory tint, there was no guarantee that would protect against UV rays,” he told Reuters Health.

Because drivers in the U.S. have their left side exposed to sunlight, UV rays have been blamed for the increased number of cataracts and skin cancers that occur on the left side, Boxer Wachler writes in JAMA Ophthalmology.

UV rays can pass through clouds and glass. To see whether car windows are protective, Boxer Wachler took a UV-A light meter to a number of Los Angeles car dealers on a cloudless May day in 2014.

He tested 29 cars from 15 different manufacturers, made between 1990 and 2014.

On average, car windshields blocked about 96 percent of UV-A rays. The protection afforded by individual cars ranged from 95 to 98 percent.

But side door windows were far less dependable. The percentage of UV-A rays blocked varied from 44 percent to 96 percent. Only four of the 29 cars had windows that blocked more than 90 percent of UV-A rays.

“It had no correlation at all with the cost of the car, high-end car or low-end car,” said Boxer Wachler.

Windshields are more protective than car door windows because they must be made of laminated glass to prevent shattering, writes Dr. Jayne Weiss in a commentary published with the study. Car door windows, however, are usually just tempered glass.

“Don’t assume because you are in an automobile and the window is closed that you’re protected from UV light,” she told Reuters Health.

Some of the car windows in this study let in enough UV-A rays to affect skin health, said Dr. Paul Nghiem, who heads the division of dermatology at the University of Washington in Seattle.
https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1104059

Unilateral Dermatoheliosis



A 69-year-old man presented with a 25-year history of gradual, asymptomatic thickening and wrinkling of the skin on the left side of his face. The physical examination showed hyperkeratosis with accentuated ridging, multiple open comedones, and areas of nodular elastosis. Histopathological analysis showed an accumulation of elastolytic material in the dermis and the formation of milia within the vellus hair follicles. Findings were consistent with the Favre–Racouchot syndrome of photodamaged skin, known as dermatoheliosis.

The patient reported that he had driven a delivery truck for 28 years. Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays transmit through window glass, penetrating the epidermis and upper layers of dermis. Chronic UVA exposure can result in thickening of the epidermis and stratum corneum, as well as destruction of elastic fibers. This photoaging effect of UVA is contrasted with photocarcinogenesis. Although exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) rays is linked to a higher rate of photocarcinogenesis, UVA has also been shown to induce substantial DNA mutations and direct toxicity, leading to the formation of skin cancer. The use of sun protection and topical retinoids and periodic monitoring for skin cancer were recommended for the patient.
 

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Automotive glass already blocks out 99% of UV rays from the factory.
Why does the factory bombard automobiles with UV rays?

All kidding aside, thanks for mentioning that but it is the front windshield only. Dermatologists in the USA and from the UK (as well as former British "colonies" such as India that drive on the "left") wrote a paper about what namegoeshere posted. This is a big deal.
 

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Just had mine tinted yesterday, 50% in the front and 20% for the rears. I normally do 50 all around, but with my infant son in the back i darkened it up this time.



The blind spot information warning came on after so took it to the dealer, they said it wasnt related and ordered me a part that should come in soon. I've read some have had that issue and it goes away after a few hours, mine did too, but they still want to replace it. Cool with me.

Here's pics in direct and indirect sunlight.
 

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How much did you pay to have window tint installed on your Accord? I'm trying to reckon how many of my local vendors are trying to rip me off. One guy is quoting me $440 for ceramic tint for everything but windshield, is that outlandish? If you want to share your experience, please post a reply! I will also start a poll for preferred tint type among driveaccord.net users.

Cost (with install):
Tint Type (dyed, metallic, ceramic):
Warranty:
 

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How much did you pay to have window tint installed on your Accord? I'm trying to reckon how many of my local vendors are trying to rip me off. One guy is quoting me $440 for ceramic tint for everything but windshield, is that outlandish? If you want to share your experience, please post a reply! I will also start a poll for preferred tint type among driveaccord.net users.

Cost (with install):
Tint Type (dyed, metallic, ceramic):
Warranty:
It depends on the brand, the installation, even where you live. Did you get more than one quote? I got Pinnacle (Formula One) ceramic tint 35% all around except the windshield for about $310 (lifetime warranty - transferrable), but that doesn't mean you're getting ripped off.

Incidentally, I've been getting Pinnacle tint on cars for about 15 years now, and I've never had a problem with it. That has as much to do with the installation as the product, though.
 

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It depends on the brand, the installation, even where you live. Did you get more than one quote? I got Pinnacle (Formula One) ceramic tint 35% all around except the windshield for about $310 (lifetime warranty - transferrable), but that doesn't mean you're getting ripped off.

Incidentally, I've been getting Pinnacle tint on cars for about 15 years now, and I've never had a problem with it. That has as much to do with the installation as the product, though.
The quote was for Pinnacle 35%. I'm willing to pay more for a higher quality product and an installer that stands behind their work but this seems well and away too expensive. I reached out to other shops and haven't heard back yet.
 

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Where are you located? Have you gotten a second or third quote? I paid $300 for Llumar ceramic. $440 seems high in my opinion. I am in the Baltimore area.
 

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I've never heard of Ziebart. The shop I previously used was a 3M preferred installer, but I left them due to poor installs. Very happy with the Llumar film on my car now. It's been about 2 years and no bubbles, creases, fading, etc.
 

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Living in central Florida tint is a must. I've tinted every vehicle since tint was available. You get used to watching out at night.
Don't know what type is on my 2018 because I only buy certified cars. Car has 8k miles and was 8k bucks less than new with better warranty.
Already had tint.
JD
 
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