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2023 Mazda CX-9 Carbon - Polymetal Gray
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I own a 2018 red Touring 2.0t that I got for $5K off sticker (those were the days!). I really like it and I'm disappointed they have gotten rid of the 2.0t as well. The new one looks like a Volkswagen sedan. I had a Accord loaner for a few days with the 1.5t and it was a pretty bad drive in comparison.

I will say that our other car is a (also red) 2022 Mazda CX-9 and it is very nice. For a vehicle with 2.5t and of fair size, it is pretty quick. I have been impressed.
Funny enough, I just traded in my 2020 Accord Sport 2.0T for a 2023 CX-9 Carbon. Got a growing family so we needed the room. Don’t get me wrong, it doesn’t snap off the line or have the cornering ability the Accord had, but I’m damn impressed by it for a 3rd row SUV. And the best part? They cut me a check for $2k positive from my Accord AND I got a $5k discount off MSRP on the CX-9 ( no add-ons to boot ).
 

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Funny enough, I just traded in my 2020 Accord Sport 2.0T for a 2023 CX-9 Carbon. Got a growing family so we needed the room. Don’t get me wrong, it doesn’t snap off the line or have the cornering ability the Accord had, but I’m damn impressed by it for a 3rd row SUV. And the best part? They cut me a check for $2k positive from my Accord AND I got a $5k discount off MSRP on the CX-9 ( no add-ons to boot ).
Sounds like you got a great deal. Got pics of your CX-9 to share? If you do not mind, share how much you paid drive out on the CX-9. That could help some people on the fence trying to make such transition.
 

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2023 Mazda CX-9 Carbon - Polymetal Gray
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Sounds like you got a great deal. Got pics of your CX-9 to share? If you do not mind, share how much you paid drive out on the CX-9. That could help some people on the fence trying to make such transition.
I will add I did lease the CX-9; was also leasing the Accord. My DAS was only first months payment ( $535 ) over 24m/12k. MF was an amazing .00001.

Sky Car Wheel Cloud Vehicle

Wheel Car Tire Vehicle Plant
 

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2021 Honda Accord 2.0T Touring
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320 Posts
Dropping my 2020 Scatpack off at the dealer for a pre trade on a 22 Sonic Grey 2.0. MSRP… I had 17 Scat which was traded for an 18 Civic Si which was traded for a 19 Sport 2.0 which was traded for this 20 Scat which is going back for a 22 Sport 2.0…. I drove the Charger for 2 years and I made $500 on it. Not so bad. View attachment 545379
Why? Gas prices? You should have went out with a bang for the Touring model. Especially these being the last for this gen 2.0t.
 

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Why? Gas prices? You should have went out with a bang for the Touring model. Especially these being the last for this gen 2.0t.
Touring models are extremely hard to find these days. I haven't seen one at any of the five Honda dealers near my home in months. According to Autotrader, there are only 24 new Accord Tourings available for sale in the United States right now. Several of those 24 are listed as "in transit".
 

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I suspect that when people realize that electric versions of those models will beat their gasoline counterparts in stoplight races, there will be a lot of gasoline versions on used car lots. :)
Too bad after the stoplight race, the gas car stops to fill up and it takes 5 minutes while the electric car stops to fill up and it takes 2 hours... 🤦‍♂️
 

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210 Posts
Too bad that to maximize the performance of the gasoline car, the tank should be nearly empty to minimize weight while the electric car can hit the drag strip with a full charge and make run after run without having to stop for gasoline on the way home. ;)
You're dishing it out Roger! I like your style! ;)

Now my response: The gas car will run and run and run for hundreds of thousands of miles with regular maintenance. The electric car will need a battery replacement that costs more than what the car is worth several times over. I've seen Teslas that need a battery replacement at the tune of $15k!

I'm not against electric cars, but they aren't ready for primetime yet.
 

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The gas car will run and run and run for hundreds of thousands of miles with regular maintenance.
Probably not if it's a Dodge which is the subject of our discussion. ;)

The electric car will need a battery replacement that costs more than what the car is worth several times over.
All EV batteries are warranted for at least 8 years or 100,000 miles (10 years or 150,000 miles in California) to as much as 175,000 miles.

The average new car buyer keeps a vehicle a little over 8 years. Most of these batteries will last much longer than the warranty period, batteries rarely fail completely and unexpectedly - instead, their capacity slowly and gradually decreases over time giving you ample warning and opportunity to decide when or if the range will decrease too far. But, even a severely degraded EV battery will suit the vast majority of drivers who only drive the vehicle 30-40 miles over their daily commutes then recharge at night. In other words, an EV battery the originally provided a 300-mile range will still be perfectly usable for a daily commute even if the range decreases to only 50 miles after 20 years of ownership.

I've seen Teslas that need a battery replacement at the tune of $15k!
I know of some gasoline-powered Ridgelines that needed $8K transmissions. :)

I'm not against electric cars, but they aren't ready for primetime yet.
That statement is not universally true - even current electric vehicles make a lot of sense for many if not most drivers.

Do they work for everyone? Of course not - you should use the best tool for the job. A Bolt isn't the best tool to tow a boat and a 3500HD Duramax isn't the best tool to deliver pizzas. :)

For your reading pleasure, I suggest these two articles:


 

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Probably not if it's a Dodge which is the subject of our discussion. ;)



All EV batteries are warranted for at least 8 years or 100,000 miles (10 years or 150,000 miles in California) to as much as 175,000 miles.

The average new car buyer keeps a vehicle a little over 8 years. Most of these batteries will last much longer than the warranty period, batteries rarely fail completely and unexpectedly - instead, their capacity slowly and gradually decreases over time giving you ample warning and opportunity to decide when or if the range will decrease too far. But, even a severely degraded EV battery will suit the vast majority of drivers who only drive the vehicle 30-40 miles over their daily commutes then recharge at night. In other words, an EV battery the originally provided a 300-mile range will still be perfectly usable for a daily commute even if the range decreases to only 50 miles after 20 years of ownership.



I know of some gasoline-powered Ridgelines that needed $8K transmissions. :)



That statement is not universally true - even current electric vehicles make a lot of sense for many if not most drivers.

Do they work for everyone? Of course not - you should use the best tool for the job. A Bolt isn't the best tool to tow a boat and a 3500HD Duramax isn't the best tool to deliver pizzas. :)

For your reading pleasure, I suggest these two articles:


Is it though?
 

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2022 Accord 2.0T 10AT Still Night Pearl
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What do you think I get for a 2019 Touring 2.0T with 18,500 mi in mint condition since no more 2.0s are being produced for the Accord. Silver with black leather.


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I would think it would bring more $ if you wait until the 2023s roll out and there are no more 2.0Ts new available.
 

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2013 Accord Sport CVT
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101 Posts
This cannot be said enough. My BMW 335 is the most stable handling car I’ve ever owned.
I won’t say a BMW G20 is much better than a 10th gen Accord. Since you’re driving 335i, it’s certainly either E90 or F30. Time has changed, and today’s 3 series became another boring sedan, which sport only in cosmetics.
Obviously the 2.0 is more powerful but my point is that if the power of the hybrid is no longer enough, an actual sports sedan probably makes more sense to buy. It does suck though that your options in the non-luxury sedan category are now less powerful. For most buyers, they could probably care less about the power difference in the 2.0T and Hybrid.
For MOST buyers, at least in Canada, they bought the lower powered version of Accord, 2.4L or 1.5L turbo. A hybrid is an upgrade for those users.
Still it sucks that Honda couldn’t just offer ALL. I mean, only 3 trim level?
 
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