Drive Accord Honda Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Simple DIYer just trying to save a buck
2004 Accord EX-L V6
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen, how bad can this problem get if I do nothing? Each time I change oil on my eighteen-year-old EX V6 auto with 161xxx miles, I notice there's a little more oil or grease on the end coming out of the transmission (top photo) as well as from what I believe to be a bearing or something about a foot out from the transmission end (middle
photo). Can someone clue me in on what may be leaking on each photo? Is there an o-ring on the transmission side that's easy to get to? This leak doesn't leave a mess on my garage floor nor does it seem to affect driving; there is also no noticeable noise when the vehicle is in motion (at least not from a drive axle); I'm simply keeping an eye on it before I possibly waste resources on fixing it. The bottom photo is another angle of the leak in the middle photo.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Wood Automotive wheel system

Shoe Tire Automotive tire Leg Wood

Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive exterior Rim Bumper
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,655 Posts
That's the intermediate shaft bearing. If you don't experience vibration at speeds, then don't worry about it. The rear catalytic converter heat shield will actually rust out first and start rattling, I see it in the background.
 

·
Simple DIYer just trying to save a buck
2004 Accord EX-L V6
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I suppose the grime on the bearing COULD be remnant from the myriad of oil leaks I finally tackled over the past year or so. I suppose I could've blasted the grime with brake cleaner first to see if anything on the bearing side of the shaft was even leaking before soliciting input from the fine people on this forum.

Regarding the first photo, is the seal that has apparently failed, relatively simple to replace or does the tranny need to be cracked open to do so?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
1st picture it looks like the outdrive seal is beginning to weap. Not a big deal, just monitor & if gets worse then get it replaced. The seal (pictured) is usually less than $15-20. Labor/time to replace will be a few hours as the CV axle needs to be removed to get to it. I strongly recommend you get an OEM Honda seal - I've had bad luck with aftermarket seals leaking after a year or two.
Camera lens Automotive tire Tire Lens Wheel

2nd and 3rd pictures is just the carrier bearing leaking out some grease. Not a huge deal, as others mentioned if you experience any vibration at highway speeds or (in my experience) when accelerating then you'll want to get it replaced.
It might be worthwhile to have the CV axle(s) replaced if/when you have that outdrive seal and/or bearing replaced. More expensive, but should the CV axle fail then you're paying the labor twice over.
 
  • Like
Reactions: emeron

·
Simple DIYer just trying to save a buck
2004 Accord EX-L V6
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Appreciate the input. A lot.

I've been trying to find the Honda part number for that seal in the first photo for a while now. My strategy in the past has been to browse hondapartsnow.com (great resource by the way) and view exploded parts diagrams to see what I'm trying to replace and any secondary parts that would need replacing at the time. This is the closest thing that I had been able to find, but wasn't sure if it was a match: (part 20)
Motor vehicle Font Engineering Auto part Parallel

Font Circle Number Brand Oval

As you can see, the exploded diagram fails to show exactly where the seal is supposed to go and the part is merely labeled 'oil seal' with it's dimensions given in millimeters. This part is absent from the separate CV/driveshafts diagram. I then resolved to simply search the entire internet for 'differential seal', 'transaxle seal', and now my favorite is 'output shaft seal'. I was not able to find a suitable match to what the diagram was showing. Andrew, until I saw the image of the seal you posted, I didn't see that this seal in question actually has what appear to be splines running the interior circumference. My next question then is this: is there a right and left? Do not the driver's side (CV axle) and passenger side (intermediate shaft) each have their own respective seals as they exit the differential? The diagram is annoyingly silent on that.

The carrier bearing is simply making a grimey mess. No vibrations or noise that I can tell at any speed. Both CV shafts have been replaced within the last couple of years; the intermediate shaft is original.

When the price is right, I do try and use OEM parts from Hondapartsnow or my local Honda dealer -- especially when it comes to seals. The replacement CV axles are not OEM. (I can hear the booing now). Not a single problem from those yet whatsoever.

Within a year or two I'd like to rebuild the entire front suspension on both sides. That would be a good time to simply replace the entire intermediate shaft (and this seal of course) which comes with a new bearing that I wouldn't have to press on.

Again, is there a right and left variant of this seal? Or perhaps the same seal for both sides?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Appreciate the input. A lot.

I've been trying to find the Honda part number for that seal in the first photo for a while now. My strategy in the past has been to browse hondapartsnow.com (great resource by the way) and view exploded parts diagrams to see what I'm trying to replace and any secondary parts that would need replacing at the time. This is the closest thing that I had been able to find, but wasn't sure if it was a match: (part 20)
View attachment 534756
View attachment 534755
As you can see, the exploded diagram fails to show exactly where the seal is supposed to go and the part is merely labeled 'oil seal' with it's dimensions given in millimeters. This part is absent from the separate CV/driveshafts diagram. I then resolved to simply search the entire internet for 'differential seal', 'transaxle seal', and now my favorite is 'output shaft seal'. I was not able to find a suitable match to what the diagram was showing. Andrew, until I saw the image of the seal you posted, I didn't see that this seal in question actually has what appear to be splines running the interior circumference. My next question then is this: is there a right and left? Do not the driver's side (CV axle) and passenger side (intermediate shaft) each have their own respective seals as they exit the differential? The diagram is annoyingly silent on that.

The carrier bearing is simply making a grimey mess. No vibrations or noise that I can tell at any speed. Both CV shafts have been replaced within the last couple of years; the intermediate shaft is original.

When the price is right, I do try and use OEM parts from Hondapartsnow or my local Honda dealer -- especially when it comes to seals. The replacement CV axles are not OEM. (I can hear the booing now). Not a single problem from those yet whatsoever.

Within a year or two I'd like to rebuild the entire front suspension on both sides. That would be a good time to simply replace the entire intermediate shaft (and this seal of course) which comes with a new bearing that I wouldn't have to press on.

Again, is there a right and left variant of this seal? Or perhaps the same seal for both sides?
Hondapartsnow is a good resource for finding OEM part numbers, I haven't had the best luck with placing orders with them sadly.

I have used and will not have a problem or hesitance purchasing aftermarket axles, as the OEM are insanely priced as I have seen. I've had good luck with Cardone CV axles from Amazon. AutoZone/Duralast ones not so much, and that's coming from a former employee(n)

Not sure if the 'output shaft seal' are is a right or left specific for your particular Accord, I do recall my '99 Accord they were in fact different in outer diameter for each side. Try rockauto, as they usually reference the OEM Honda part numbers in the descriptions, that may help you trace down the parts you need. You can always go to the dealer and ask them for the p/n's.

The 'splines' you see are not splines, thats actually grease that is placed inside the seal in an effort to prevent it from tearing when the CV axle is inserted into it.
 

·
one wheel drive
Joined
·
802 Posts
Yes there is a right and a left axle seal. The rubber has internal spiral splines (if you want to call it that) that help keep the fluid in when going forward.

I have a little experience with what you're dealing with from working on my 99's B7XA. First, my shaft support bearing failed and as mentioned above it would feel like a knocking at your feet on the highway or accel. The heat shield on mine was gone and I figure the exhaust heat was partly responsible for the premature death of the bearing.

Later I noticed some fluid seepage on both sides of the shafts at the trans. When jacked up and in gear it would sound like a bag of rocks tumbling. It was a sign of the diff carrier bearings starting to go. And there was just enough play where the axles weren't supported enough to run true hence the wetness around the ends. It is said that when it gets bad enough, you can pull the axles out and the carrier bearings will fall apart internally. Luckily that wasn't my case and I replaced the trans with a 6MT before finding out how long it would've gone. It doesn't look like you're anywhere near that with the little wetness in your pix.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top