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I just ordered my new car last week, when does the belt need to be changed? How much? Thanks in advance!
 

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Its a belt on the V6...the I4 has a chain.
 

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The V6 has a belt that is recommended to be changed at 7yrs/105k miles under normal driving conditions. Under severe conditions (high heat, lots of short trips, really cold weather, stop and go traffic all the time etc) it is recommended that you change it every 5yrs/60k miles.

Allowing the belt to break can require and complete engine rebuild or replacement. It is not wise to go beyond the specified intervals.

The water pump, cam and crank seal, along with the other belts (ones you can see) should all be replaced. On a V6, if you use the dealer (which is highly advised, you don't want cheap parts and a unfamiliar mind for this job) you're looking at anywhere from $850-1100 depending on where you live (labor rate differences).
 

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Just not as durable as a chain. Less rotating mass but not as durable.
Honda has been using timing belts since the 60's so I would think that if you as the owner replace your timing belt on time, there is no durability issue to worry about. :yes:
 

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Also, for you 06+ Honda owners, your maintenance minder should tell you when to replace the timing belt.
 

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that is insane that the V6 is running a belt.
I agree. That's my main gripe with this car. As we all know, there's no perfect car, so we have to choose the best compromise. If I was going to put big miles on my Accord, I'd have eliminated it right off the bat due to that fact. And it's not only the timing belt: it's also missing DOHC and hydraulic valve lash adjusters. However, since I don't plan to ever open my engine, this issue moved from 1st to last place.
With those significant cons (to me) moved down the list, the rest of the package is much brighter; I think Honda's V6 is superior (IMO) than the competition in terms of smoothness, power delivery, and refinement. And most importantly, especially for Coupe owners, the Accord is MUCH better than the competition everywhere else. Decisions, decisions.

The only question for most owners is WHERE do you fall between 60K and 100K miles since practically all cars see some 'severe' duty during those miles. I wasn't aware of the age factor, but being rubber, makes sense. This is a violation of Federal rules that an engine shouldn't require a tune-up before 100K miles, but am sure Honda lawyers found a loophole to justify their cust-cutting antics. So yes, even if your engine has 20K miles, you'd have to perform that service after 5 to 7 years.

Finally, I'd definitely follow the MM (maintenance minder) on this service, but I question if it has the ability to read ambient temperatures and age (to reduce interval due to 'severe usage'). The former is possible, since most cars have an outside temperature sensor, but I doubt it's connected to the ECU. And I don't believe Accords have a calendar feature (at least without Navi), so an owner might never get the MM message to change the belt after 7 years with low mileage, for instance. Good day gang.
JC
 

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Honda has been using timing belts since the 60's so I would think that if you as the owner replace your timing belt on time, there is no durability issue to worry about. :yes:
Not only Honda, most V6 OHC engines, whether single or dual cam use belts.
Honda, Nissan, Toyota, Chrysler, Mitsubishi ,Mazda, GM, Ford , BMW all have made V6 motors with belts.
 

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Not only Honda, most V6 OHC engines, whether single or dual cam use belts.
Honda, Nissan, Toyota, Chrysler, Mitsubishi ,Mazda, GM, Ford , BMW all have made V6 motors with belts.
Exactly. There must be a reason that the 6-bangers haven't moved to chain yet, though I wouldn't know why (not a lot of engine knowledge, especially in the engineering department).
 

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Not only Honda, most V6 OHC engines, whether single or dual cam use belts.
Honda, Nissan, Toyota, Chrysler, Mitsubishi ,Mazda, GM, Ford , BMW all have made V6 motors with belts.
Your first sentence is just the opposite: most are chain-driven. Just tell me which current V6 cars use a timing belt other than Honda/Acuras; I challenge you. You can scratch BMW, Toyota, and Nissan right off the bat; they make none. I'm almost sure Ford, GM, and Mazda (Ford) have none as well. My only doubt is Chrysler and Mitsubishi, but even if both did, it hardly justifies 'most'.

Your second sentence could be mostly right (BMW has never made a V6), but that's in the past, and we're talking about the present. Plus it's an obvious indication that's what consumers are demanding (less maintenance and higher reliability - a belt snaps much easier than a chain).

The issue is simple: timing belt engines are cheaper to produce, but require more maintenance. And it's a fact. I has NOTHING to do with how good an engine is. Another fact is Honda's V6 is one of the best engines on the market. If it had DOHC, chain-driven cams and hydraulic valve lash adjusters, it'd be even better, but there's no perfect car. Since I'll sell my Coupe before the engine needs to be opened, I'm much happier with double-wishbone front suspension and a better interior than the competition than an even better engine. It's a matter of choosing the car with the least cons... or most pros. All have plenty of both; it's just a matter of prioritizing them, and everybody has a different way of doing it.

As a side comment, Toyota still makes V8 engines with timing belts (not sure about the new 4.6 though), but not their V6s; go figure. Again, great engines made cheaper by the use of belts. Only reason why manufacturers still put them on their engines is because almost all buyers don't know anything about engine design. In fact, most salesmen don't know either; just ask them for fun. Take care.
JC
 

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i had a vr6 gti that had a timing chain . it needed replaced at about 180,000 miles it was a pain in the butt to get to . it required removing the transmission etc. there were also tefflon chain guides that could snap and needed replacement . i looked at the placement of were the timing belt on the honda was . and i was actualy relived . ill bet the rollers are more reliable also . sounds like the cost assosiated with the milage is about the same . a timing belt job on the vr6 is about 1800
 

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The V6 has a belt that is recommended to be changed at 7yrs/105k miles under normal driving conditions. Under severe conditions (high heat, lots of short trips, really cold weather, stop and go traffic all the time etc) it is recommended that you change it every 5yrs/60k miles.

Allowing the belt to break can require and complete engine rebuild or replacement. It is not wise to go beyond the specified intervals.

The water pump, cam and crank seal, along with the other belts (ones you can see) should all be replaced. On a V6, if you use the dealer (which is highly advised, you don't want cheap parts and a unfamiliar mind for this job) you're looking at anywhere from $850-1100 depending on where you live (labor rate differences).
would any of this fall under warranty .
 

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Nope. Not a warranty item.
 

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Belts are no doubt much cheaper implement. Not to mention Honda did not change there V6 block design since it was intro. in 1992. There are minor changes as time went by but pretty much the same block. All their V6 blocks are belt driven. Belts are quieter but is like a ticking time bomb in the engine. With the current 8th gen accords we just got new heads bolted onto a true and tried block. It looks like it was a cost move. Im not worry at all because I use to have a integra gsr before it was totaled. The b18c1 DOHC belt driven engine took every beating. Spirted driving, autox and hpde events. I have never snapped a timing belt no matter how hard i drove.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Follow up from my question about the timing belt. Considering the manitance cost with the belt and a few miles to the gallon, I decided to go wtih the EXL Navi 4 banger. So far I 'm happy with it. Only disapointments are the factory fogs, power passenger seat, home link, and door handles. The duals look great too...oh well...
 

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i'll take a belt any day over a chain. Ive owned a few cars with chains. They dont need to be changed at 100k, but when they hit 200k they get noisy and tend to fail. My last saab had a chain that was noisy, it was a $2000 job to fix. Id rather have a belt thats designed to be replaced. Same with nissan some of the sr20 motors have timing chain related failures between 130-150k.

At least with a belt, I can spend about a grand and have all new parts.
 

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i had a vr6 gti that had a timing chain . it needed replaced at about 180,000 miles it was a pain in the butt to get to . it required removing the transmission etc. there were also tefflon chain guides that could snap and needed replacement . i looked at the placement of were the timing belt on the honda was . and i was actualy relived . ill bet the rollers are more reliable also . sounds like the cost assosiated with the milage is about the same . a timing belt job on the vr6 is about 1800
It cost $1,150 on my 2.8 Passat. I got the Accord quoted at around $850.
 
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