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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those contemplating a block heater install, I found the instructions for the OEM Honda install at College Hills Honda here:

http://www.collegehillshonda.com/instructions/accord/2013/engineheater.pdf

Probably not for the faint of heart, but looks reasonably easy. I have one on order and will try to take some pics for a DIY post when I do it.

I've mentioned in a couple other posts, but I had a block heater in the Camry I traded for my new EX CVT as well as the wife's Corolla. They really increase your winter mileage by greatly shortening the time required to get to normal operating temp as well as making heat available sooner on cold days. I don't typically bother with it in temps above 20F or so, but have a timer and harness to both cars that comes on around 3AM and what a difference!

Part I purchased was: 08T44-SNA-101
 

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For those contemplating a block heater install, I found the instructions for the OEM Honda install at College Hills Honda here:

http://www.collegehillshonda.com/instructions/accord/2013/engineheater.pdf

Probably not for the faint of heart, but looks reasonably easy. I have one on order and will try to take some pics for a DIY post when I do it.

I've mentioned in a couple other posts, but I had a block heater in the Camry I traded for my new EX CVT as well as the wife's Corolla. They really increase your winter mileage by greatly shortening the time required to get to normal operating temp as well as making heat available sooner on cold days. I don't typically bother with it in temps above 20F or so, but have a timer and harness to both cars that comes on around 3AM and what a difference!

Part I purchased was: 08T44-SNA-101
Having it on a timer makes sense. I might do it rather than get the remote starter for these winter months. Thanks for the post.

Do you know how long it takes for the block heater to heat up the engine block?
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Having it on a timer makes sense. I might do it rather than get the remote starter for these winter months. Thanks for the post.

Do you know how long it takes for the block heater to heat up the engine block?
I haven't installed it yet, but the device I had on my Camry and my wife's Corolla were a metal tube that slid into a cavity in the block made for that purpose. So it was much easier to install and didn't require draining the coolant. Rather, it truly heated the block and radiated through the engine. I would guess it heated it to 80-100F range and did that nicely in 3 hours.

But the Accord heater is an immersion type. So you're replacing a plug in your coolant system with an immersion heater plug that will heat up your coolant, hence radiating heat to your engine. I'll probably start it at 3AM like I did the Toyota and see how that works and adjust the time if need be. I unhook about 6AM so it was running about 3 hours. Different heaters put out different wattage too which will make a difference. I think the Accord one is 400 watts, but not sure.

I ordered mine through the same place I bought the car from and they're shipping it direct to me for $70 including shipping. Dealer install would probably be a couple hours labor at their going rate I would guess.

Anybody here actually done this yet or had the dealer install one?
 

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Those instructions from CH seem to be a bit overcomplicated....don't really see why they removed the bumper for example. If I had a 9G, I'd go out and look under the hood to see if I can get eyeballs on the bolt that gets replaced with he heater. If yes then chances are some combo of ratchet / socket / extension / u joint will be able to get at it without disassembling a bunch of trim.
 

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Having it on a timer makes sense. I might do it rather than get the remote starter for these winter months. Thanks for the post.

Do you know how long it takes for the block heater to heat up the engine block?
I've only ever seen these in Alaska and northwest Canada, but I'd be curious to see how much it helps in our neck of the woods. Keep us posted!
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those instructions from CH seem to be a bit overcomplicated....don't really see why they removed the bumper for example. If I had a 9G, I'd go out and look under the hood to see if I can get eyeballs on the bolt that gets replaced with he heater. If yes then chances are some combo of ratchet / socket / extension / u joint will be able to get at it without disassembling a bunch of trim.
I agree completely. I was just throwing them out there for anyone considering a block heater so they could get an idea of the task at hand. Certainly not a simple plug-in like my Camry was!

After I looked the doc over, I was pretty much of a mind that I wasn't going to need to remove the bumper. That appeared to be mostly for the routing of the AC plug. I wondered why it was necessary to unplug the negative wire from the battery as well... Just so no one could start it? That also seemed like overkill. But, it'll really come down to having the part in hand and seeing the task 1st hand and making a decision on what's really necessary. That's why I was wondering if anyone here had done it yet. Not much in the DIY section for these so far!
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've only ever seen these in Alaska and northwest Canada, but I'd be curious to see how much it helps in our neck of the woods. Keep us posted!
It may not be worth your while in Raleigh, unless you regularly see temps below 20F or so.

I've run them in our Toyotas for several years, only plugging them in when the temps are below 20 or so and for about 3 hours on timer prior to morning commute time. I have one coming for my new 13 Accord EX CVT and will likely install it this weekend. If you do see the colder temps as noted, there are many benefits:

* Reduces carbon monoxide emmissions during first few minutes of operation of a cold engine. Most say almost 1 pound reduction per cold start difference.

* Reduces wear and tear on engine as oil is warmer and flows better, engine gets better lubrications. Better lubrication at startup helps vehicle longevity.

* Maximum fuel efficiency is when engine is at normal operating temp, somewhere around 200-212F. Obviously, you get there a lot faster with a pre-heated engine, so better fuel economy.

A simple answer from the car talk guys:
http://www.cartalk.com/content/find-out-if-block-heater-might-help-your-car

For you in NC, I'd say it may be questionable as to whether you'd get a real benefit, but if you see a 15-20 or more mornings per winter with the temps at or below 20F, it might be worthwhile.
 

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Thanks for the link, it's pretty much in line with what I had found already.

More than anything else, I was surprised that on2 is thinking about it and was curious about how much benefit he'd see from it. Getting the heat to the cabin quicker is the main thing I'm wondering about; winters here are pretty mild and aren't known for taking a toll on engines. Overnight temps do fall below 20 a few times in an average winter, but it's usually not too bad. My nose hairs have never frozen here, haha. My car also spends the night in a garage with an apartment above it, so I'm probably not going to mess with it unless I ever move back to snow country.
 

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I would mostly be doing it for the fuel economy since the car gets horrible fuel economy when warming up which is, as discussed, even longer during these cold months.

The benefit of having a warmed up heater is a bonus that I didn't think of which is pushing me to get this part added.
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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I would mostly be doing it for the fuel economy since the car gets horrible fuel economy when warming up which is, as discussed, even longer during these cold months.

The benefit of having a warmed up heater is a bonus that I didn't think of which is pushing me to get this part added.
Those brutal 40deg NC mornings... :D

Jay
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Block heater installed - easier than install docs make it appear!

I installed the EOM Honda bock heater today. Disclaimer: This is about my experience in doing this and I'm just relating it to the group. If you do something I mentioned in this post, it's your responsibility, not mine.

I referenced the install doc link in previous post in this thread, but I have to say those docs appear to be designed to generate hourly revenue for a Honda dealer as I found it totally unnecessary to drain the radiator or drop the front bumper. After reading that even after draining the radiator that when you pull the plug in the engine block to replacing it with the heater plug, you're still going to loose antifreeze. So I skipped the radiator drain step, placed a large (clean) catch basin under the front of the engine. The car was jacked up only on the drivers front lift position. I backed out the existing plug which was really tight and needed a cheater bar to break free. Just before that plug came out, I had the brass heater plug (washer installed) ready and when I pulled the existing one I immediately put the new one in and hardly lost any fluid at all. From what I recovered, I lost just under 8oz. Ran that through a coffee filter and recycled it back in the coolant. Total capacity is 2 gallons and after running it, the level is fine without replacing any coolant.

I followed the doc on routing until I got over near the air cleaner intake, then I went down along the backside of the radiator and there's an opening to the front at the bottom (again, bumper NOT removed). Popped out into the area in front of the radiator. I did remove the plastic cover on top over the radiator towards the front grill and ended up taking the bolts out of the horns so I could easily get my arms down in the radiator area. wire tied it to the temp sensor arm then routed the plug out through the lower honeycomb grill as shown on the docs and tied it off with a couple black wire ties.

Here's the engine before install showing the 19mm plug you remove (save the plug and washer just in case):


Here's the block heater plug element (brass) installed and torqued down before wiring:


Here's the wiring from the engine block (yes, I trimmed the wire tie, but left it showing here to better illustrate where it was anchored.):


Make sure you clean up anti antifreeze that spills from the plug when you remove it. I used a creeper to get under the car and clean all I could see from there also.

So that's it. I feed the heaters on 2 cars by a single digital timer (Westek TE06WHB but not sure that one is still in production). I run them from 3AM to 6:15AM when it's predicted below about 20F.

One word of caution on using these on a timer or in general... easy to be in a daze before coffee in the morning and forget you're plugged into the wall. So I take a red shop rag and open the drivers door on both cars and drape it over the door so it's seen before the drive can enter the car as a reminder to "unhook".

Hope to see slightly better mileage in the cold weather. It helped for 2+mpg on my previous Camry and my wife's Corolla, not to mention faster cabin heat. Stay warm!
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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Awesome! How much coolant do you think you lost? Can you plug and unplug without raising the hood? I'm assuming you park outside?

Jay
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Awesome! How much coolant do you think you lost? Can you plug and unplug without raising the hood? I'm assuming you park outside?

Jay
Jay besides the 8oz I recovered, any lost was negligible. The overflow tank is in the same place it was before the install.

I don't park outside in the winter, I'm in a non-heated garage. The bike gets that bay from March-November, then the car moves in.
 

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I don't park outside in the winter, I'm in a non-heated garage. The bike gets that bay from March-November, then the car moves in.
Haha! Me too! Having serious riding withdrawal right now.

The engineer in me is wondering what the coolant temp difference is between being plugged in and not plugged in.

In the 80s we had a GM Diesel. Remembering to plug it in meant the difference between going somewhere in the morning and not.

Jay
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank You. Much appreciate the tips and pictures.

I was thinking of the same as I was reading the directions.

Lots of unnecessary steps. I will order one now after seeing how easy it was for you.
Glad you found the post useful! Good luck with the install. Let me know if you have questions and let us all know when you get it installed.
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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thanks for the pics of your install. i definitely want one of these now. i see different part numbers listed on ebay when a do a general search for 2013 honda block heaters, are they all pretty much the same? i guessing the differences would be wire length for different length cars?

great tip for remembering the heater is plugged in btw.
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
played it safe with OEM part for a few $ more

thanks for the pics of your install. i definitely want one of these now. i see different part numbers listed on ebay when a do a general search for 2013 honda block heaters, are they all pretty much the same? i guessing the differences would be wire length for different length cars?

great tip for remembering the heater is plugged in btw.
I looked at the EBAY ones too. Katz and a couple other brands. But only having had my car a week when I ordered it, I decided to pay a few extra $$$ and play it safe with the OEM Honda block heater from the dealer. Since the heater part of this sits on the inside of the cooling system I didn't want to give them a reason to say I'd done something wrong by putting in a non-Hondapart. Probably over paranoid, but my first new car in many years. I called the part dept at the dealer I bought my car from and they beat the best internet price I could find on the real Honda part.

We started the day at -17F today and it got up to a balmy +18F, but the sun is down and the temp is falling fast again! I've got her plugged in for the night and it'll run from 3:30-7AM and will be ready to roll in the AM. I don't typically run it unless the temp will be under 20-25F.
 

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Backyard wrench
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Anyone else?

Anyone else installed the block heater in your 9th gen Accord yet? Was on the fence about it when I bought my EX CVT around thanksgiving, but installed it first week of December and with the nasty early winter we've had it's been completely worth it!
 
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