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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Its a habit... I can't leave anything stock very long. I've only owned my 2014 MSM EX 6spd Accord for one week.

To celebrate my 1 week of ownership, I performed the following mods today.

OEM Leather Steering Wheel
Rear Lip Spoiler
Clutch Delay Valve / Device Removal (CDD)
Cut / Turned / Welded factory shifter for better orientation

There are a lot of DIYs and vids on deleting the CDD on the TSX. The new Accords are very similar even though it is a different part number for the clutch slave cylinder. I can confirm the process is the same, and it wasn't hard to do.

I know there has been a lot of talk back and forth on why someone should complete this mod. For me, it was personal preference on how it makes the clutch engagement feel. In my opinion, it is much more direct feeling and consistent. Additionally, this mod didn't cost me anything to do. You simply remove a part from your stock clutch slave cylinder. If you don't like like it... you can put it back in.

I have completed this mod on several vehicles over the years, and I've never regretted it. I noticed an immediate improvement and I am happy with the results.








 

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13 ex coupe
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this make shift faster or more feel to put gear?
i had 2010 accord 5 speed mt.now 13 ex coupe cvt maybe my next car has 6 spped mt.
i just wander.
thanks.
 

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I have no I idea what you removed and I should've gotten a manual, I regret this almost everyday :( .... but thanks for adding more DIY!
 

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Thank you! I've been wondering how to do this since before I even got the car!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks like it could be done without even removing the slave cylinder from the car.
While there is a lot of room in there. Its much easier to move the cylinder to a workbench where you can get the c-clip out using both hands without an obstructed view.

Bleeding the clutch afterwards only took me 5-mins tops.
 

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Anytime! I also want to say thank you to you as well.
I modified my shifter after reading your great writeup :thmsup:
Glad I could help!
 

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so what exactly does the cdd removal do or how does it change things?
 

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I want to try this because my clutch pedal feels pretty weird. It feels kind of rubbery.
The slave cylinder looks easier to get to on the I4 than my V6.
 

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so what exactly does the cdd removal do or how does it change things?
Honda puts a restrictor valve in the clutch slave cylinder to (supposedly) lessen the shock load to the clutch components during spirited shifting for the V6 engine 6-speed cars, this is done by slowing down the flow of hydraulic fluid in the release of the clutch disk.

The end effect is the perceived delay when the driver "pop" the clutch, it takes a fraction of a second longer for the clutch disk to engage the flywheel, probably cause more clutch wear too in doing so.

What I found when I did this mod 4 years ago was there must have been some crud build-up on the mesh filter screen inside this slave cylinder, it will cause further inconsistent "vagueness" when the driver releases the clutch pedal. I noticed this when I took the slave cylinder off the first time but could not removed the C-clip fused from corrosion, however in doing so I cleared out the crud on the filter mesh screen when I put the old slave cylinder back while while waiting for the new one to come in, magically the clutch response improved significantly, the vagueness and inconsistent clutch engagement went away.

With a brand new car which should not have any crud build-up, I'm a little bit surprised OP mentioned the noticeable improvement with the restrictor removed, although I still believe the restrictor valve is put in there by Honda to reduce the likelihood of drive train warranty claim, not for the enjoyment pleasure of the manual transmission die-hard.
 

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Let say that I didn't remove the slave cylinder from the car. Would I bleed the clutch the same way?
 

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Cool thanks. You gave me something to do this weekend :)

Last dumb question. How did you get the C clip off? Would a 90 degree mechanic's pick work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cool thanks. You gave me something to do this weekend :)

Last dumb question. How did you get the C clip off? Would a 90 degree mechanic's pick work?
I used a mechanic's pick and a small flat tip. Also, if you look really close you can see that I drilled a very small hole in the lip where the c-clip sits. I oriented the hole so that I can rotate the clip and push it away from the edge using the pick through the hole, and then used the flat-tip to pop it the rest of the way out.

I tried to get the clip out without the small hole, but the clip just kept rotating.
 

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Excellent. Thanks again. Happy modding!
 

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Honda puts a restrictor valve in the clutch slave cylinder to (supposedly) lessen the shock load to the clutch components during spirited shifting for the V6 engine 6-speed cars, this is done by slowing down the flow of hydraulic fluid in the release of the clutch disk.

The end effect is the perceived delay when the driver "pop" the clutch, it takes a fraction of a second longer for the clutch disk to engage the flywheel, probably cause more clutch wear too in doing so.

What I found when I did this mod 4 years ago was there must have been some crud build-up on the mesh filter screen inside this slave cylinder, it will cause further inconsistent "vagueness" when the driver releases the clutch pedal. I noticed this when I took the slave cylinder off the first time but could not removed the C-clip fused from corrosion, however in doing so I cleared out the crud on the filter mesh screen when I put the old slave cylinder back while while waiting for the new one to come in, magically the clutch response improved significantly, the vagueness and inconsistent clutch engagement went away.

With a brand new car which should not have any crud build-up, I'm a little bit surprised OP mentioned the noticeable improvement with the restrictor removed, although I still believe the restrictor valve is put in there by Honda to reduce the likelihood of drive train warranty claim, not for the enjoyment pleasure of the manual transmission die-hard.
I don't think removing the restrictor will increase clutch wear. In fact I think it will reduce it. With the restrictor in place, it essentially "feathers" the clutch a little when you release the clutch pedal. With the restrictor removed there will be less slippage and less wear. You could make the argument that this would be a little harder on cv joints, engine mounts, gearbox etc but I bet it's slight, especially on the I4 which has a pretty wimpy clutch. My personal opinion is that honda put in the restrictor to help smooth out the shifts.

Kinda like putting a shift kit in an old automatic transmission. Less slippage of the clutch packs = firmer, quicker, more direct gear engagements but less wear on the clutch friction plates. Tougher on u-joints.
 

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6MT JUNKIE
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I really want to do this lol.
 

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I don't think removing the restrictor will increase clutch wear. In fact I think it will reduce it. With the restrictor in place, it essentially "feathers" the clutch a little when you release the clutch pedal. With the restrictor removed there will be less slippage and less wear. You could make the argument that this would be a little harder on cv joints, engine mounts, gearbox etc but I bet it's slight, especially on the I4 which has a pretty wimpy clutch. My personal opinion is that honda put in the restrictor to help smooth out the shifts.

Kinda like putting a shift kit in an old automatic transmission. Less slippage of the clutch packs = firmer, quicker, more direct gear engagements but less wear on the clutch friction plates. Tougher on u-joints.
That is exactly what I was stating in my post. I took a 3-day high-performance driving school years ago at a local racetrack, the cars we used were manual transmission Corvettes, we were told not to baby or slip the clutch, "just pop it" was what we were told, slipping the clutch causes more wear.
 
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