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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,
So I have just purchased a brand new 2014 Honda Accord Sport (Manual transmission). This is my first new car and everything before this were used beaters. My problem is that I really don't take care of cars and that had made my past beaters even worst. However I would like to change that with my first new car purchase.

Can you guys please give me pointers of how you guys take care of your cars and what kind of services should I be doing on the car? I plan on selling the car at 120K or 8 years, which ever comes first.

Thanks guys!
 

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If you want the peace of mind you can either get the extended warranty and you could even pay for a maintenance plan from your dealer. I'm sure they would love to sell you one.

But just follow the maintenance minder, keep your tires inflated, and just drive it. It's a Honda it will last.
 

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also, highly suggest you polish it 2x a year... early spring & mid-fall is usually best time. Try & wash vehicle at least 2-3x per month, this way you'll notice any muck that may have fallen from sky or a tree. Also, clean your alloy wheels with separate soft brush each & every time. Never wash or dry vehicle in a circular motion, that may cause swirls. Use up & down motion or straight 12 to 6 O'clock. Also, if you live in the north or use the car near a beach or lake much; buy all-season mats. They cost about $100 on ebay
 

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Hi Guys,
So I have just purchased a brand new 2014 Honda Accord Sport (Manual transmission). This is my first new car and everything before this were used beaters. My problem is that I really don't take care of cars and that had made my past beaters even worst. However I would like to change that with my first new car purchase.

Can you guys please give me pointers of how you guys take care of your cars and what kind of services should I be doing on the car? I plan on selling the car at 120K or 8 years, which ever comes first.

Thanks guys!
Check out this thread. Particular attention to the posts by glen e.

http://www.driveaccord.net/forums/showthread.php?t=79730[SIZE=%223%22
 

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Besides the clean and wax advice, follow the maintenance minder religiously. Changing the oil and filter on a regular basis is good insurance of long engine life.
 

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If you can admit that you don't take care of your cars, then take it to the dealer and have them service it. If you did nothing but change the oil every 10k on this car there's a good chance it easily lasts 8 years/120k miles.
 

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So many things…..how anal retentive are you? With regard to washing the car, know that EVERYTIME you wash your car you create micro scratches. It is unavoidable. On a dark car it is much more noticeable. To minimize that damage always use clean sponges, plenty of soap and a lot of water. WHEN you get those surface scratches, consider using colored car wax (black is fine for gray colored cars.) They work wonders to temporarily conceal blemishes.

To protect your interior never eat or drink inside the car. Vacuum the car regularly. Clean your floor mats at least a few times per year. Remove them from the car, hose them down and scrub them in the summer when they can dry. In the winter, a good wipe/scrub with a heavy spray of Windex will keep them looking good. (Or as already mentioned by Yanks1, get rubber mats.) Also, Windex is also good for cleaning any cloth interior.

For the exterior, watch where you park. Avoid smaller spaces and NEVER park next to a two-door car. They have longer doors and therefore a much greater probability they will ding your door when opened.

Never put anything on the paint (briefcases, boxes, bags, etc.) If you have a sunroof, that is okay. Glass does not scratch (easily).

If you live where it snows, be very careful removing snow from the paint. (It has become a law in most states that you cannot legally drive with accumulated snow on the car.) If you use a brush of some-sort, never press too hard or the brush’s base may make contact with paint. Common sense on that one. (My neighbor once used a snow shovel and severely damaged her paint. The same can type of damage can happen with full sized brooms.)

Remove bird crap quickly. It is acidic will actually eat into the paint.

Avoid driving behind trucks. Construction trucks can obviously drop gravel and damage your paint. But even regular 18-wheelers (or 14 now) can suck up pebbles and sand off the road. If you ever hear that light rapid “tih-tih-tih-tih” sound of sand on your windshield, move - your paint is getting damaged.

Stay on top of maintenance and the mechanical side of the car will last well beyond 150,000 miles. Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the help guys. I HAVE to take good care of this car, there is no other option. I have paid very heavily for not maintaining my previous rides.

I had to junk my last ride (It was an auto transmission) as I didn't replace the transmission fluid for 100K. Do manual transmissions need their transmission fluid replaced? If yes, at what intervals?
 

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1. Change fluids when required by the manual.

2. Rotate the tires as suggested by the manual...and check that the people doing it aren't over-torquing the lugnuts. (They should be using a torque wrench)

3. Learn how to properly wash the car. Several good threads about that on this forum. Two bucket-method and/or a foam gun will keep you from swirling the living hell out of the paint, which always makes a car look older and trashier.

4. Good. Floor. Mats.

5. Manual transmissions have fluid in them as well, as does the differential. Usually these are both better described as oil than fluid. Both require changing...your owner's manual tells you the recommended intervals.

6. Do not use the clutch to hold the car on a hill. This adds unnecessary wear and tear and is a sure way to require needing a new clutch a lot earlier in the car's life. Besides, the Accord has a good hill system that keeps the car from rolling on you. Learn to use it because brake pads are much cheaper than a new clutch.

7. Use seat covers to keep the seats clean. They're disposable. When combined with good floor mats you peel that stuff out and the interior looks almost brand new. This makes a difference if you ever go to trade the thing in.

8. Have the wheels properly aligned (all four wheels need it) or at least checked for alignment yearly. Especially if you have gone over a good bit of rough roads.
 
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