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So you tout the smooth ride quality of the CVT 4-banger over the "harsh" ride of the V6, and then say you bought coilovers and a stiffer rear sway bar?! LOL! This thread is gold!
 

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Because I don't know everything, and like I already mentioned, if you comprehended, I have driven several V6 9th gen accords -- sedan and coupe. The ride quality is abysmal compared to the CVT. And I'm speaking from my own experience, I made a thread because I wanted opinions. There is quite literally a poll attached to the thread. You posted because... I don't know? You wanted to be an ass?

I'm not sure I have any clue how to go about that. I'll take a look... but If the CVT gets too hot after 5 minutes of spirited driving then 🤷‍♂️... I said this before but I don't plan on tracking it
With the cvt being such a concern, just get a temperature gauge and cooler for the transmission. You want keep it a little cooler then stock. Find out if something like this will fit: CVT Oil Cooler Kit for 2016+ Honda Civic 1.5T
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
So you tout the smooth ride quality of the CVT 4-banger over the "harsh" ride of the V6, and then say you bought coilovers and a stiffer rear sway bar?! LOL! This thread is gold!
The engine vibration is what makes it unbearable. Even with VCM disabled completely. I just dislike everything about it... it simply does not drive the same
 

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This might be the first time I've seen someone complain about Honda's V6, a multi winner of Ward's Automotive 10 Best Engines award, as being rough and unbalanced.


Diesels, Turbos Dominate 2014 Ward's 10 Best Engines

Dec 12, 2013

Three diesels, a tiny 3-cyl. turbo and a battery-electric vehicle are among the 2014Ward's 10 Best Engines, illustrating the importance of fuel economy as automakers develop and market advanced new powertrains.

This is the 20th year for Ward's 10 Best Engines, a competition created to recognize outstanding powertrain achievement, world-class technologies and those rare engines or electric propulsion systems that are so compelling they help sell the vehicle.
The winners, which include eight engines using direct fuel injection and six with forced induction, emerged from a field of 44 powertrains evaluated by WardsAutoeditors in October and November.

To be eligible, a new or significantly improved engine or propulsion system must be on sale in a production vehicle during the first quarter of 2014. Base price is capped at $60,000, up from $55,000 last year.

This year's winners:

· 3.0L TFSI Supercharged DOHC V-6 (Audi S5)
· 3.0L Turbodiesel DOHC I-6 (BMW 535d)
· 3.0L Turbodiesel DOHC V-6 (Ram 1500 EcoDiesel)
· 83-kW Electric Motor (Fiat 500e)
· 1.0L EcoBoost DOHC I-3 (Ford Fiesta)
· 2.0L Turbodiesel DOHC I-4 (Chevrolet Cruze Diesel)
· 6.2L OHV V-8 (Chevrolet Corvette Stingray)
· 3.5L SOHC V-6 (Honda Accord)
· 2.7L DOHC H-6 boxer (Porsche Cayman)
· 1.8L Turbocharged DOHC I-4 (Volkswagen Jetta)

The Ward's 10 Best Engines competition pits the latest engines available in the U.S. market against the returning winners from the previous year. Usually, at least four engines that won the prior year return to the winner's circle. This year, only two are returning winners: Honda's 3.5L V-6 and Audi's 3.0L supercharged V-6.

"We weren't looking to throw the bums out, as they might say about an election. We were just really impressed with a flood of new powertrains," says WardsAuto WorldEditor-in-Chief Drew Winter. "What was great yesterday might be less impressive tomorrow because engine technology is changing so rapidly."

The arrival of six advanced diesel engines in multiple vehicle segments shook up the competition as all six scored well in the evaluations. This is the first time more than two diesels have made the list in a single year. The biggest decline this year comes in 4-cyl. engines, as only two make the cut. Last year, there were five.


[ . . . . ]


Honda has a repeat winner, the Accord's 3.5L SOHC V-6, which has been a favorite of Ward's 10 Best Engines judges over the years.

This unflappable V-6 is the best naturally aspirated 6-cyl. engine in a mainstream vehicle at a time when most automakers are switching instead to turbocharged direct-injected 4-cyl. powerplants for better fuel efficiency.

Even using conventional port fuel injection, Honda's 3.5L V-6 beats most turbo-4s by routinely delivering 28 mpg (8.4 L/100 km) during our evaluations, same as it did last year, thanks in part to cylinder deactivation.

This latest award represents the 3.5L engine's fifth trophy since 2005. Include earlier awards when the engine displaced 3.0L, and this SOHC architecture has earned eight trophies since 2003.





Honda Motor Co. Ltd.: 3.5L SOHC V-6

Jan 02, 2008

As much as everyone respects Honda Motor Co. Ltd.’s engine-development abilities, the company hasn’t won that many 10 Best Engines awards.

We figure it’s due to Honda’s overwhelmingly conservative philosophy. While it’s always stretching the boundaries of engineering, its production engines tend to be comparatively unassuming in specification.

Translated more directly: For a decade or more, Honda has deployed some of the most intelligent powertrain technology in the business, while resisting the horsepower and displacement escalation that is so much a part of the U.S. market.

It is the only one of Japan’s three major auto makers that has refused to develop a V-8 for production. Thus, where a competitor uses a V-8, Honda has a V-6; often, it pits a 4-cyl. against a sea of competitors running V-6s, even in highly competitive segments.

So the latest 3.5L SOHC V-6, winning a 10 Best Engines award for the first time, goes somewhat against Honda’s grain. The jump for the all-new ’08 Accord is from the longstanding 3.0L V-6 to an extra half-liter of displacement. It is the largest engine ever fitted in a Honda passenger car.

But the uncharacteristic displacement bloat doesn’t affect Honda’s signature refinement. “No unpleasant vibration or noise,” says Executive Editor Tom Murphy. “I think Nissan’s VQ (V-6, a perennial 10 Best Engines winner) has met its match.”

And several judges comment on the new 3.5L V-6’s smoothness, also a Honda watchword.

Along with the refinement there’s a stout 268-hp rating that’s backed by outstanding flexibility in almost all speed ranges. The power is about what was expected of premium-vehicle V-6s just a couple of years ago.

This engine also gets a boost in efficiency when coupled with the 5-speed automatic transmission: Honda’s Variable Cylinder Management (VCM) cylinder-deactivation system enables the V-6 to operate on three, four or six cylinders, depending on engine load.

This is combined with the expected VTEC (Variable valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control) wizardry fitted to all Honda engines. The VCM system also is abetted by active engine mounts and a unique active noise cancellation system that helps to mask the hiccups and transitions of 3- and 4-cyl. operation.

Accord coupes fitted with the new 3.5L SOHC V-6 and the 6-speed manual dispense with the VCM and the accompanying noise- and vibration-cancelling hardware and run with the more-conventional 2-phase VTEC that delivers that same unmistakable and luscious howl when the valvetrain switches to high-rpm mode.

This new 3.5L V-6 is the embodiment of Honda virtues: refinement and efficiency combined with performance that exceeds the hard numbers. Honda’s new V-6 now challenges Nissan’s stellar VQ as the best volume-market V-6.




Honda Motor

Dec 19, 2008

The word “rocket ship” is rarely proffered on behalf of the Honda Accord, a fine car, to be sure, but known for reliability and practicality rather than sweaty-palm titillation.

Yet, more than one 10 Best Engines judge used that term to describe the 3.5L SOHC V-6 that powers the Accord coupe to its second consecutive 10 Best Engines award.

This 271-hp V-6 does so many things well. Its steady road manners might lull the driver into thinking this powerplant is sedate and timid.

But crack open the razor sharp throttle at any speed, and this engine, with Honda’s typical understated excellence, springs to life like a tiger hiding in the brush, pouncing on a hapless antelope.

This engineering masterpiece remains amazingly composed, even at the 6,800-rpm redline, without a hint of torque-steer in the front-wheel-drive Accord.

Channeling this power is a magnificently smooth-shifting 6-speed manual that cycles through every gear as if in complete harmony with the vehicle. The 1-2 shift satisfies with an ease and confidence unmatched by any production 3-pedal V-6.

The only reason for a buyer to bypass the manual is because Honda’s nifty 3-stage Variable Cylinder Management cylinder-deactivation system is limited to automatic-equipped Accords.

While most V-8s with cylinder deactivation can cut off fuel to half the combustion chambers, Honda’s system allows the 3.5L V-6 to function on six, four or three cylinders, depending on engine loads, saving even more fuel and creating a new level of performance.

Ward’s evaluated only the manual Accord for 10 Best Engines, which is no consolation prize, given the fatter power curve. Even without VCM, several judges managed 21 mpg (11.1 L/100 km) in spirited driving, better than other premium V-6s tested.

Honda’s 3.5L V-6 scores extra points for also being incredibly versatile, appearing in the Honda Odyssey minivan, Ridgeline pickup and Pilot cross/utility vehicle, as well as Acura luxury cars. Honda produces nearly all those engines in high volume at its plant in Anna, OH.

Ward’s judges eagerly heap praise on the Accord V-6.

“Plenty of power on hand,” writes Associate Editor Byron Pope on his score sheet. “I didn’t expect this much power in an Accord. Very impressive.”

Editor Drew Winter says the Honda powerplant “somehow seems faster and better than last year.”

A V-6 this good belongs in a car priced well above $30,000, but the Accord coupe can be had for $28,805.

This package totally speaks to the enthusiast buyer who wants practicality most of the time, but superior performance all of the time.
 

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V6 6MT CBP
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No different than most cars. The V6 is just less balanced, by design. If you were to drive a CVT i4 you would probably understand
:LOL::LOL::LOL:

I know you stated you didn't want this advice in your original post - BUT - to get to your stated HP goal, your best, most reliable, and cheapest option would be to sell the I4 CVT and get a V6, preferably MT.

If you reeeeeeeally believe what you are spewing, I wish you all the luck going to the aftermarket and throwing forced induction parts at a car not designed for it.
 

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Because I don't know everything, and like I already mentioned, if you comprehended, I have driven several V6 9th gen accords -- sedan and coupe. The ride quality is abysmal compared to the CVT. And I'm speaking from my own experience, I made a thread because I wanted opinions. There is quite literally a poll attached to the thread. You posted because... I don't know? You wanted to be an ass?

I'm not sure I have any clue how to go about that. I'll take a look... but If the CVT gets too hot after 5 minutes of spirited driving then 🤷‍♂️... I said this before but I don't plan on tracking it


Bought some Tein Flex Z Coilovers. Next comes Progress rear sway bar. Suspension -> Tires + Wheels -> Axleback -> KTuner -> Turbo -> Actual tune. Still a long way out and things always change especially with fabricated parts. So come back in a few.
I'm back in the few. Day 8 question: What supercharger and/or turbo parts have you purchased, what vendors have you contacted, what prep work have you done for those items? Congrats on the coilovers. Should add at least 20 hp once VTEC kicks in.

Yo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I'm back in the few. Day 8 question: What supercharger and/or turbo parts have you purchased, what vendors have you contacted, what prep work have you done for those items? Congrats on the coilovers. Should add at least 20 hp once VTEC kicks in.

Yo.
Oh, cute! You're back...

In all seriousness, what did I expect from this forum? Everyone here is so pompous. Please remove the burr from your ass and I'll be happy to talk parts all day long.
 

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Oh, cute! You're back...

In all seriousness, what did I expect from this forum? Everyone here is so pompous. Please remove the burr from your ass and I'll be happy to talk parts all day long.
So talk. Forget my rear that you seem to be so fond of and let us all know how your build is coming along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So talk. Forget my rear that you seem to be so fond of and let us all know how your build is coming along.
I'm beginning to wonder if you're even capable of talking without being negative. The burr is still in your ass! Overlord is fitting.
 

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I'm beginning to wonder if you're even capable of talking without being negative. The burr is still in your ass! Overlord is fitting.
Deflecting. Day 9.
 

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You can keep using your energy, but I'm not going to engage with someone incapable of acting like an adult. Day 10
OP, take your time and do plenty of research as you've been doing. It's a big decision.

If you have any tuner shops or muscle car shop in your area, you can stop by and ask for their opinions as well.

I installed a T3/T4 turbo on a 1993 civic many years ago. Only boosted 8 PSI but the sound it made...... Awesome👍!!
 

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You can keep using your energy, but I'm not going to engage with someone incapable of acting like an adult. Day 10
You abandoned your turbo supercharger project because of me? 👀
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
OP, take your time and do plenty of research as you've been doing. It's a big decision.

If you have any tuner shops or muscle car shop in your area, you can stop by and ask for their opinions as well.

I installed a T3/T4 turbo on a 1993 civic many years ago. Only boosted 8 PSI but the sound it made...... Awesome👍!!
Absolutely! I contacted xxxxx to see if I can talk to anyone else who went thru them w/ a CVT 2.4. Also going to speak w a few performance shops here in Indy but very few have JDM let alone Honda experience, so I will come back with whatever I find. I expect lots of NOs, but there's always someone crazy enough to condone it :)
 

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Also going to speak w a few performance shops here in Indy but very few have JDM let alone Honda experience, so I will come back with whatever I find. I expect lots of NOs, but there's always someone crazy enough to condone it :)
There is a shop local to me that installed a supercharger on a 9th gen Civic si. They told me the guy had over $12k in that set up. My guess is because of paying for labor, fabrication, and finding a fueling solution to support forced induction. The kits to purchase aren’t horribly priced it’s all the unknowns and things not included in the kit that add up.
 

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You can give Moorespeed in Columbus a call. They do a lot of k-series powered stuff. They did a lot of my exhaust welding.


Something we never brought up was cost. If you can't do any work yourself, be prepared to just buy a different car instead. It will be very expensive for odd ball platforms like this where no kits are available or a lot of custom fabrication has to be done. I think it took me like 150 hours to get my car to where it is now. If you covert that with the shop rates, you're looking at $15000+ in just labor.
 

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V6 6MT CBP
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How many miles are on this car you plan to put forced induction on?
 
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