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Holy crap. So I put the Mishimoto oil catch can on about 800 miles ago (at 18,000 miles odometer) and I checked it today and found it a whopping 3/4 of the way full! I can't believe how much oil this thing is picking up. When I poured out the oil from the catch can into a bottle it had some foamy white residue at the bottom.

Am I wrong to feel a little concerned about this? I've seen others who installed a catch can on their 2.0 and they seemed to have very little pickup. Makes me wonder why mine is catching so much.

For what it's worth, I've done a mix of short in-city trips and longer highway trips with the car since installing the catch can. Sometimes I drive the car like a grandma, other times I get on it and give it the 'ol Italian tune up. Not sure what the hell is going on but if my intake was getting coated with that much oil before the catch can it must be dirty af by now. Smh.
 

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Makes me think I should get one for my 2018 2.0 6MT
 

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Majority of Honda Accord owners do not use catch cans. And the Honda Accords we find with over 250,000 miles, I am guessing over 95% or maybe exactly 100% of them do not have catch cans. So, it makes me wonder what advantage the catch can gives over those who still put over 250,000 miles with no catch can.

Is there a big difference or advantage to a car when someone has a catch can?

I bought my Nissan Maxima brand new in 2008. 12 years later and with over 267,000 miles on odometer, the CVT transmission went out. I sold it and bought my brand new 2020 HAH. I never used a catch can on my Maxima. Car lasted over 267,000 miles. And if not of the CVT failure, maybe I could have gone to over 300,000 miles.

So, I wonder what is the advantage of the catch can over those who never put it in their cars or in their Honda Accord but still get over 250,000 miles easy.
 

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Holy crap. So I put the Mishimoto oil catch can on about 800 miles ago (at 18,000 miles odometer) and I checked it today and found it a whopping 3/4 of the way full!


Am I wrong to feel a little concerned about this? I've seen others who installed a catch can on their 2.0 and they seemed to have very little pickup. Makes me wonder why mine is catching so much.
You said "oil", but it should be a mixture of oil, fuel and water..
Supposedly, shorter trips and stop and go driving is the biggest worry when it comes to these DI engines and the evolution of these catch cans adds credence to that, so I'd say it is working correctly.
 

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Turbo lag
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Majority of Honda Accord owners do not use catch cans. And the Honda Accords we find with over 250,000 miles, I am guessing over 95% or maybe exactly 100% of them do not have catch cans. So, it makes me wonder what advantage the catch can gives over those who still put over 250,000 miles with no catch can.

Is there a big difference or advantage to a car when someone has a catch can?
Most Accords out there with near 250,000 miles are also not direct injected (9th gen and 10th gen). The catch can can prevent carbon build up (to an extend) by minimizing the amount of oil that makes into the intake.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Majority of Honda Accord owners do not use catch cans. And the Honda Accords we find with over 250,000 miles, I am guessing over 95% or maybe exactly 100% of them do not have catch cans.
So, I wonder what is the advantage of the catch can over those who never put it in their cars or in their Honda Accord but still get over 250,000 miles easy.
Well, the majority of Honda Accords (especially those with 250k+ miles) on the used market don't have direct injection motors. Only the more recent ones do. Direct injection motors are the ones known for oil blowback.

The advantage of the catch can is to "catch" the oil before it gets back into the intake system, which prevents carbon build up over time.

Will this make a measurable difference in preventing future maintenance on the motor due to less carbon buildup? I don't know. All I know right now is that my motor is blowing out a fuckton of oil, as evidenced by what the catch can is catching, and I don't like it.

You said "oil", but it should be a mixture of oil, fuel and water..
Yea. It likely is a mixture of those components. At the bottom of the reservoir, there was a white foamy substance, so I would assume that's the other components besides oil.

You said "oil", but it should be a mixture of oil, fuel and water..
Supposedly, shorter trips and stop and go driving is the biggest worry when it comes to these DI engines and the evolution of these catch cans adds credence to that, so I'd say it is working correctly.
Seems like a dumb question but do you think I should be topping my oil off based upon how much oil is caught by the catch can? I'm tempted to add a pour to make up for what was lost.
 

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Well, the majority of Honda Accords (especially those with 250k+ miles) on the used market don't have direct injection motors. Only the more recent ones do. Direct injection motors are the ones known for oil blowback.

The advantage of the catch can is to "catch" the oil before it gets back into the intake system, which prevents carbon build up over time.

Will this make a measurable difference in preventing future maintenance on the motor due to less carbon buildup? I don't know. All I know right now is that my motor is blowing out a fuckton of oil, as evidenced by what the catch can is catching, and I don't like it.
@caravantomidnight You have an engine, not a motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@caravantomidnight You have an engine, not a motor.
"The differentiator seems to be that engines contain their own fuel source to create motion, while a motor draws on an external source. Many would say an engine uses fuel, whereas a motor uses electrical or mechanical energy to create motion. But the words engine and motor have become interchangeable in large part."

Engines vs. Motors | J-Tech Institute
 

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"The differentiator seems to be that engines contain their own fuel source to create motion, while a motor draws on an external source. Many would say an engine uses fuel, whereas a motor uses electrical or mechanical energy to create motion. But the words engine and motor have become interchangeable in large part."

Engines vs. Motors | J-Tech Institute
LOL “J-Tech”.
 
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...do you think I should be topping my oil off based upon how much oil is caught by the catch can? I'm tempted to add a pour to make up for what was lost.
That's not a significant amount compared to the min-max oil amount tolerance. Besides, there is not only oil loss, there is also oil dilution (the gasoline sneaking into the crank case), but that is also an insignificant amount (in a healthy engine) compared to the min-max.

So how to check the oil level? I'd say looking at the dipstick would be a good option.
 

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The catch can can prevent carbon build up (to an extend) by minimizing the amount of oil that makes into the intake.
The advantage of the catch can is to "catch" the oil before it gets back into the intake system, which prevents carbon build up over time.

Will this make a measurable difference in preventing future maintenance on the motor due to less carbon buildup? I don't know. All I know right now is that my motor is blowing out a fuckton of oil, as evidenced by what the catch can is catching, and I don't like it.
Does the catch can give any noticeable advantage over those who never install it? No. We have engineers who designed this car to last a long time. We have the Honda history of reliability and longevity. I am sure if a catch can was very important in assuring longevity and reliability, the engineers at Honda could have installed it from factory. Same for all other car manufacturers that I see on the internet people installing catch cans which cost over $350 in their engine.

The only thing I see about this catch can is that most of the people on the forum love to work on their cars, mod their cars and make it "better". So, it is a fun project to do for some people and gives them "peace of mind". Same for the normal person out there who just does normal regular maintenance on their car. The car lasts just as long with no disadvantage to one with a catch can.

Besides, draining that catch can means your oil may need to be topped off, depending on how much oil and how frequently you drain oil from your catch can. So, will you be topping off your oil often before every 5,000 miles? The cars which have lasted over 250,000 miles are those that are usually as close to stock as possible. So, a catch can is not really important to guarantee a car's engine will last longer.

I own a 2012 Infiniti QX80 which has direct injection engine. I bought the car with 79,000 miles on it. After 5 years so far, the car now has 170,000 miles on odometer. No catch can. I do 10,000 miles oil changes. Car still drives great. Parked my Accord and been driving my QX for now. I maintain it well and I have never had any reason to put a catch can in it. Its a V8 with a lot of power and I have never babied this car either. The most strain I have put on this car is when I go hardcore offroading along with Jeeps who are shocked to see my stock QX in places that they never believed someone would take such a stock vehicle to where I can easily damage the car.

A catch can is something that a car enthusiast who loves to work on their car will install for extra "peace of mind". But it is not a necessary thing that helps improve something better than those who do not install it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
We have engineers who designed this car to last a long time. We have the Honda history of reliability and longevity.
I agree with you that Honda has a history of reliability and longevity, but I don't know that I totally agree with your first statement. The newer Hondas (and newer cars in generals, as we see more and more small/turbo/DI engines being produced by various manufacturers) are designed with a different philosophy that is more related to passing emissions and being fuel-efficient. But those goals come at a cost. In this case, it appears long-term carbon buildup is a consequence of the engine design coming from that philosophy. That's where the direct injection skepticism is coming from.

Also, there is a thing called "planned obsolescence" which can come up at any point in time. No company is immune to that temptation. Has Honda given into it in the past? Nope. Does that mean they never will in the future? No, it doesn't. Especially when they can blame it on "emissions standards" which effectively tie the engineer's hands in terms of what types of engines they design.

What I'm saying is, there are reasons to be skeptical of direct injection engines, and we've yet to see exactly how they perform in mass quantity over a long period of time. For all we know, getting carbon build-up removed from these engines may become routine maintenance in the future as we learn more about how the cars age, and for many, that sucks.
 

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Oh yea, DARKART is so much better. What they say isn't wrong. The words are used interchangeably. Get over it.
My point is that instead of using the actual definition of words in language in order to properly communicate, you choose to quote a trade school. Not an English or linguistics professor from maybe Harvard or Stanford, but a trade school. 👌🏻

Live well in your willful ignorance.
 
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What I'm saying is, there are reasons to be skeptical of direct injection engines, and we've yet to see exactly how they perform in mass quantity over a long period of time.
We have, it's the entire VW FSI and TFSI family. To me, they are what made carbon buildup so famous.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My point is that instead of using the actual definition of words in language in order to properly communicate, you choose to quote a trade school. Not an English or linguistics professor from maybe Harvard or Stanford, but a trade school. 👌🏻

Live well in your willful ignorance.
Dude. As someone who's taken linguistics classes at university, linguistics would totally, 100% be on my side. Words are used interchangeably all the time in society. Some words even change over time to mean something entirely different. There are innumerable examples of this.

The fact that you came into this thread with absolutely nothing to contribute to the topic at hand but a meaningless opinion on how a word "should" be used shows nothing more than the fact that you have too much time on your hands and you're resorting to forum trolling.

Regardless of who said it, the content of the message is totally true: the words engine and motor are often used interchangeably. If you want to use a hardline definition of each and use them separately, knock yourself out. But trolling other people online who use the words interchangeably is not only misguided, it's a complete waste of time. Grow up.
 

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Some DI engines have a injector before the valves in the intake that wash the valve. Those DI engines do good. Others do not. Those DI engine build carbon on the valves. My wifes Santa Fe 2.0T straight DI and I have a catch can on it. Catch cans will very big time depending on the outside air temp. Hot days less in the can. Cold days more in there. I would have to empty the Santa Fe can in between oil changes or it would fill up. Fun fact what you are catching would be sticking to the valves and Honda only uses 1 injector nothing in the intake track. Ford and Toyota run 2 injectors per cylinder... Maybe Infinity does also. Turbo DI cars are way worse because of the larger crank case pressure on a turbo car.
 

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Am I wrong to feel a little concerned about this

Yes. The gunk in the catch can is likely mostly water condesation from hot oil/gas being depositied in a cold catch can. Those very same vapours could be safely combusted by removing the catch can and returning the PCV system to its original state.
 

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Hey Caravan, I haven't had anywhere near that amount of stuff collected in mine - but YMMV (see some of the replies below)...


How much would it cost to have your mixture of fluid analyzed/identified? If not too expensive, might be interesting to figure out what you have and how much of each...
 
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