Drive Accord Honda Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Read Only
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

My Accord Hybrid is now almost 4 months old and has around 4200 miles on it and is running like new (need some minor fixes though) except for mileage drop due to cold weather.

The maintenance minder shows that the oil life is 70% so seems like it degrades 10% every 1000 miles.

Should I wait until the maintenance reminder shows a notification or should I schedule for a maintenance once it hits 5000 or 6000 miles ?

Regards
 

· Banned
Joined
·
14,456 Posts
Hi All,

My Accord Hybrid is now almost 4 months old and has around 4200 miles on it and is running like new (need some minor fixes though) except for mileage drop due to cold weather.

The maintenance minder shows that the oil life is 70% so seems like it degrades 10% every 1000 miles.

Should I wait until the maintenance reminder shows a notification or should I schedule for a maintenance once it hits 5000 or 6000 miles ?

Regards
That's 10% about every 1,400 miles for you, based on the Maintenance Minder's algorithm of YOUR driving habits.

Why do you want to change your oil when your oil life indicator is at 65%?? (Based on YOUR driving habits, you will hit 65% oil life at 5,000 miles).

When does your owner's manual suggest changing oil?

Have you read through this thread??
When to change oil? 3500 miles, follow maintenance minder? When? Help! ლ(ಠ益ಠ)ლ
https://www.driveaccord.net/forums/...iles-follow-maintenance-minder-when-help.html
 

· Read Only
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply.

This is my first new car and that too a Hybrid and wanted to get some opinion from 10th Generation Hybrid owners.

Based on what I have read so far in the forum so far seems like following MM would be wise thing (trust the vehicle) to do but was not certain about tire rotation since this would be an external wear.

Based on what I have seen my oil life indicator should show 60% around 4500 miles (around 10% every 1125 miles), which means If I follow the MM my vehicle will be scheduled for my first service around 10k miles.

Regards
 

· Banned
Joined
·
14,456 Posts
If you don't trust Honda engineers, you can always establish your own rules by making data-driven decisions based on YOUR engine and YOUR driving habits. At your next oil change, take a small sample of oil and send it off to the lab. Blackstone is one such company that for a flat fee, will tell you how much "life" your oil has remaining.
 

· Cruising in Montana
Joined
·
5,081 Posts
Myself and a few others here have actually sent used oil to a lab for analysis. In my case, I wanted to see if the maint. minder was accurate. I waited until it got to 0% then sent it in for analysis. I did that two or three times and each time they said I could go longer! A year or two later, I did the same with the ATF, having about 30,000 miles on the old sample (I changed it before the MM told me to). Again they said go longer, to 50,000 miles. Later that year the MM indicated an ATF change, about 50,000 miles after the indication last came up. I now follow it for everything.

So Honda really does know their cars.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Bear in mind most tire mfgs recommend rotation at 7500 mi, Costco also and it is included in the purchase price of tires 10k is a realistic oil change time with current oils used, less obviously if the MM recommends it.






mm
 

· Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I'm currently at 5,053 miles on my 2018 HAH Touring and it shows 60% oil life left. However, the "A1" light came on recently (about 150-200 miles ago). I will likely go ahead and get the tires rotated around 6,000-7,000ish miles, as I don't want to wait to rotate them until the MM get to 15% or less on oil life. Because at this rate, that could be 10,000+ miles.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Glad to come across this discussion. I was going 11K miles between oil changes when the service tech at the local dealership chided me for it and said I shouldn't be going any more than 7,500 miles. I mentioned I'm following the maintenance minder, but he said "they (Honda) aren't seeing what we (dealer techs) are seeing". I call BS. Interestingly, I did some napkin math: If my car is getting roughly 50% better mileage than the non-hybrid version because the engine isn't running as often, then if I factor in the number of miles where the engine is actually running (11,000 mi / 1.5) = 7,333. That math may be bogus, but it does tie out to changing the oil around 7,500 miles on the ICE.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
I think the maintenance minder calculations make even more sense (versus a straight "by miles" method) for our Hybrids, given that the engine isn't running for a non-trivial percentage of the miles driven.

I was a little surprised by someone's post above, in which the A1 indicator came up, but the oil life still showed 60% (or maybe it was 50%). Perhaps the A1 indicator is also looking at elapsed time, wanting you to change the oil at least once a year, in the case of a low-miles car.

If I recall right, our MM indicator got down to around 10% when I had our first oil change and tire rotation, at around 9,000 miles. Maybe that's a but long, but our dealer advises sticking to the MM schedule. (Although, this dealer also changes out the filter at every oil change, even though Honda just says to change the filter every other oil change. But their price for an oil and filter change, plus tire rotation is very reasonable, somewhere between $60 and $65.)

I'm very happy with the minimal maintenance costs so far (total miles is around 14k now, so we're still some months away from oil change #2). I'm also going to be VERY happy with what I expect to be very long brake pad life, given how much of the braking is being provided by regenerative braking, with minimal brake pad wear.
 

· Registered
2019 Accord Hybrid
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hi. Just joined the forum. I have been looking for something like this. Thanks for being here.

I have the 2019 Accord Hybrid. I love this car. Currently, I have 8000 miles on it and it is coming up on its 2nd oil change. I stopped by the local dealer to see what was involved on the 2nd maintenance interval. Oil, air filters, tires, ... the normal stuff.

He then told me, that at 30,000 miles, I needed to have the transmission fluid changed. I was a bit confused by this, because, from what I have read, there is no transmission. The car uses a Drive force transfer system. Basically, the electric motors. I know the specs read that it has an eCVT, whatever that is, but I'm not sure that is an actual transmission, such as a CV Transmission.

So, what is the deal? Does it need the eCVT fluid changed? Does it even have fluid?

Thanks
 

· Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
He then told me, that at 30,000 miles, I needed to have the transmission fluid changed.
The Maintenance Minder will tell you when it needs changing, with code #3. Mile intervals aren't necessary; go by the MM, not the recommendation of someone who gets paid more if you do it more often.

I was a bit confused by this, because, from what I have read, there is no transmission. The car uses a Drive force transfer system. Basically, the electric motors. I know the specs read that it has an eCVT, whatever that is, but I'm not sure that is an actual transmission, such as a CV Transmission.
Your impression is close. AFAIK, "Drive Force Transfer" is a generic term meaning, well, the transfer of driving force. But then, "transmission" is similar. "Transmission" means the act of moving power from one place to another.

All cars have a transmission system, that moves power from the engine and/or motors to the wheels. It usually includes at least a differential that allocates power unequally to two wheels so you can execute turns. In a purely gas car, it includes a variable gearbox that can change the gear ratio, and a panel for the driver to specify how the gearbox should do that. So the shortened name "transmission" is sometimes applied to the gearbox, the panel that the driver uses, or both.

The HAH has the differential, some other gears, and the panel; but not the gearbox. The differential and gears need lubrication, and get it from transmission fluid. Which can need to be changed. Your owner's manual uses the name "transmission" in a couple of places to refer to the panel.

About "eCVT." That term originated, I think, with the Toyota Prius. It has a three-way mechanical gearbox that sends some engine rpm to the wheels, and some to a generator. The exact split is controlled electronically (hence the "e") by how much braking is applied to the path to the generator. Since the engine rpms do depend on wheel rpms, as controlled electronically, it is called an eCVT even though it is nothing like a traditional CVT.

The HAH has no such mechanical gearbox. There usually is no direct relationship between the engine rpms and the wheel rpms. But when both are running, the (irrelevant) ratio between engine and wheel rpms varies continuously and is controlled electronically. Since people expect to be told what kind of "transmission" it has, "eCVT" is used.
 

· Registered
2019 Accord Hybrid
Joined
·
14 Posts
The Maintenance Minder will tell you when it needs changing, with code #3. Mile intervals aren't necessary; go by the MM, not the recommendation of someone who gets paid more if you do it more often.


Your impression is close. AFAIK, "Drive Force Transfer" is a generic term meaning, well, the transfer of driving force. But then, "transmission" is similar. "Transmission" means the act of moving power from one place to another.

All cars have a transmission system, that moves power from the engine and/or motors to the wheels. It usually includes at least a differential that allocates power unequally to two wheels so you can execute turns. In a purely gas car, it includes a variable gearbox that can change the gear ratio, and a panel for the driver to specify how the gearbox should do that. So the shortened name "transmission" is sometimes applied to the gearbox, the panel that the driver uses, or both.

The HAH has the differential, some other gears, and the panel; but not the gearbox. The differential and gears need lubrication, and get it from transmission fluid. Which can need to be changed. Your owner's manual uses the name "transmission" in a couple of places to refer to the panel.

About "eCVT." That term originated, I think, with the Toyota Prius. It has a three-way mechanical gearbox that sends some engine rpm to the wheels, and some to a generator. The exact split is controlled electronically (hence the "e") by how much braking is applied to the path to the generator. Since the engine rpms do depend on wheel rpms, as controlled electronically, it is called an eCVT even though it is nothing like a traditional CVT.

The HAH has no such mechanical gearbox. There usually is no direct relationship between the engine rpms and the wheel rpms. But when both are running, the (irrelevant) ratio between engine and wheel rpms varies continuously and is controlled electronically. Since people expect to be told what kind of "transmission" it has, "eCVT" is used.
Thank you for the great explanation.
SSS

...

...
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top