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2021 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T
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I've had some experience with CrossClimate2 tires... I used them as a winter wheel/tire setup for my 2019/2021 Accords and now I have them mounted year-round on 20" wheels for my 2022 Highlander.

They are excellent tires- but their main selling point is that they are excellent in the snow. Since you mentioned that you really only have to worry about snow a few days per year- they might be overkill for what you need. With that said- they also excel in the rain. I've driven them in some pretty heavy rain at highway speeds and they are are very stable. They are pretty quiet and smooth- but to be honest, I'm not entirely sure how smooth and quiet they would be given the low profile 19" tire size on an Accord Touring.

My 2019 and 2021 Accords both came with the 19" wheel and tire package from the factory- but I opted for a 17" wheel and tire for my winter wheel and tire setup with CrossClimate2 tires for those Accords. In the 17" tire size- they were great... but the OEM tire size for the 19" wheel and tire package is very low profile on the 10th Gen Accord- so I'm sure it would be a bit rougher. I LOVED them in the 17" size on my Accords.

While my Highlander has these tires in a 20" size... there is still a lot more tire sidewall with the 20" wheels/tires on my Highlander compared to the 19" wheel and tire package for the Accord. With that said, the tires are smooth and quiet on my Highlander too.

One thing to note, however, is that the CrossClimate2 is a directional tire and it has a very unusual tread design. Some people really like it, others not so much.

On my 2021 Accord:
View attachment 545273

On my 2022 Highlander:
View attachment 545274

After some experience with these tires- my only complaint- and it's a pretty minor one... is that little stones love to get caught in the tread groves with these tires. It's not particularly problematic and it really doesn't cause any issues- it's just annoying for someone like me who is kinda OCD about my cars.

You might want to look into Sam's Club or Costco for tires. They are often significantly cheaper- not just for the tires themselves- but also for install. Plus, they come with a road hazard warranty at no extra cost.

Sam's Club has those CrossClimate2 tires in the Accord's 19" tire size for $263 each, $70 off a set of four- for a total of $982... plus $80 for installation ($40 if you have a Plus membership). Even if you aren't a member, the savings that you'll get off of the tires will more than pay for the cost of the membership to join for a year. Costco's price is pretty similar.

With winter approaching- a lot of stuff seems to be out-of-stock because demand is high right now- with everyone wanting to get tires installed before the snow starts flying... at least in northern states... but that demand might impact availability elsewhere too.

I'm a big fan of Michelin tires in general- not just the CrossClimate2. They usually are at the top end of the pricing spectrum, but I've always felt that they were worth it. I've had a few good sets of Goodyears too. I think that perhaps the Goodyear Assurance Comfortdrive tires might be worth a look. They are on the cheaper side and they still seem to have good ratings for comfort, lifespan, quietness, and wet/dry handling. They were my second choice when I was shopping for tires when I put my 20" wheels on my Highlander (It came with ugly 18" alloys from the factory).
Hello all - I have a 2019 Touring 2.0t that needs new tires. Have the OEM Touring rims and plan to keep with original tire size (235/40/19).

Car came with OEM Michelin Primacy MXM4. I have found them to be decent. No major complaints, but don't think think they represent the best balance of performance and value. Also they are currently out of stock everywhere right now, so I am looking for some other good options. I have used Tirerack.com and other sites and have narrowed the choices down to mainly three tires.

Here are my priorities: 1) Solid Dry / Wet handling, 2) Ok in snow (about 2-5 days/year where I live), 3) Not particularly noisy, 4) >45K actual mileage (not just the warranty milege), 5) Cost, 6) Good looks.

Current models under consideration:
1) Pirelli P7 AS Plus 3 ~ $984 installed (based current deals at Discount Tire)
2) Continental Pure Contact LS ~ $1137 installed
3) Michelin Cross Climate 2 ~ $1263 installed

Currently leaning towards Pirelli based on the cost value but looking for feedback before I buy them.

Do you have any experience with any of these three? Is there another tire you would recommend instead...?
I currently have a set of the Goodyear Comfort Drive tires on our 2021 Accord Touring 2.0T. They are as quiet as the Michelin OEMs, but definitely are costing me 2-3 miles per gallon in fuel economy. I don't feel they are any better performers than the Michelin Primacy tires. After doing some math with current gas prices, the Michelin Primacy tires actually will save you money over the life of the tire due to better fuel economy. I can't speak for other brands/tires, but the Comfort Drives are not the best option in my opinion. Next set will probably be Michelin.
 

· 2010 2.4EX
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I currently have a set of the Goodyear Comfort Drive tires on our 2021 Accord
Touring 2.0T. They are as quiet as the Michelin OEMs, but definitely are costing
me 2-3 miles per gallon in fuel economy.
'Tire Whisperer' here... In that case, it's perfectly OK to maintain the cold/not driven tire pressure 1-2psi higher than indicted for normal driving, to compensate for your fuel economy loss with those particular tires.

For your 2021 Touring:
Normal: F/R 32/32psi
High Speed: F/R 35/33psi

You may run the 'higher speed' cold pressures if you prefer, or simply run Normal +1psi = 33psi F/R.

But avoid doing what the 'Hypermilers' do - adding from 5-10psi to maximum sidewall pressure.
 

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2021 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T
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'Tire Whisperer' here... In that case, it's perfectly OK to maintain the cold/not driven tire pressure 1-2psi higher than indicted for normal driving, to compensate for your fuel economy loss with those particular tires.

For your 2021 Touring:
Normal: F/R 32/32psi
High Speed: F/R 35/33psi

You may run the 'higher speed' cold pressures if you prefer, or simply run Normal +1psi = 33psi F/R.

But avoid doing what the 'Hypermilers' do - adding from 5-10psi to maximum sidewall pressure.
My door placard says 33 psi front and rear. I'm taking your advice and putting a couple extra pounds cold pressure in to see if it helps mpg.
 

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2021 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T
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(y)

Experiment incrementally - run 34psi for two weeks/tankful, then 35, tops.
The way the temperature changes in 24 hours here in the mountains, the tire pressure could change 3 lbs from morning to afternoon anyway. If I understand correctly, it changes about 1 lb for every 10 degrees of temperature change (non nitrogen filled). Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

· 2010 2.4EX
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1,199 Posts
The way the temperature changes in 24 hours here in the mountains, the tire pressure could
change 3 lbs from morning to afternoon anyway. If I understand correctly, it changes about 1
lb for every 10 degrees of temperature change (non nitrogen filled). Correct me if I'm wrong.
It's actually about 0.8534937937472474747 psi per 10F temperature change, but yeah, 1psi for 10F/6C is a good rule of thumb, lol!

I hear you about the temperature roller coasters, especially on post-2000 Earth. That's why an early morning/never driven condition is suggested for setting cold tire pressures. If you set them 33psi at 6am, temperature 30F, and by 2pm it's 70F, your pressure is 37, that's ok. Don't bleed. If you do, you'll be at 29-30psi the next early morning.

Ditto if you set them 33psi at 6am & 30F on a Sunday, then mid week it's 50F at 6am, don't worry - too much - about it. If you bleed that warm Wednesday morning, by next weekend at 6am the morning temp is down around freezing again, see what I mean?

Hard to maintain proper tire pressures on a planet losing control of her own climate! That's why so many drivers just keep their tires consistently at door sticker temperature plus-5psi at all times and forget about it.

I just check ever other weekend, set it to door frame placard, or 1psi over, and let the chips fall where they may. In my case, that means cold psi that can fluctuate between 31-33 around where I live, which most modern tires are quite tolerant of.....

...vs my computer repair buddy, who often lets his tire pressures drop to 20-25psi before going to the gas station or having me set them. One time, on a 2001 Celica he used to own, he let the cold pressures drop to 15psi! I'm to this day still amazed at least one of the tires didn't decide to AWOL its rim!
 

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Michelin CrossClimate2 Tires

Tire Rack’s test results:
https://bit.ly/TireRackCC2

Engineering Explained:

Tyre Reviews:

Tesla 3 owner’s experience: https://bit.ly/CC2Tesla

It is the highest rated performance tire by Consumer Reports, with a projected tread life of 85,000 miles. What’s amazing about this tire is that it is ranked as a performance tire (better handling and traction) rather than a touring tire (emphasis on comfort) while still being comfortable. Considerably better than a performance or touring tire on snow and ice, but not as good as a dedicated snow tire. Considerably better than a dedicated snow tire in terms of stopping and handling on dry pavement. Better than snow, touring, or performance tires in regard to hydroplaning. The downsides: •Considerably more expensive than other tires, somewhat offset by very long tread life. •Depending on the tires you now have on your car, you may lose 0–3 mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Got the Pirelli tires installed last Saturday on my 2.0t Touring. Since then I have driven about 130 miles, mostly commuting to work and I haven’t really pushed them hard yet. Too soon to notice fuel impacts, but initial overall impressions of the tires are positive. They seem quieter than the OEM Michelins that just came off with 3/32” left at 47.1k miles. I haven’t pushed them hard into a corner yet but handling seems decent. No noticeable issues (vibrations, abnormal tracking) - so far so good. I was overall happy with the Michelins but they weren’t available and would have been ~ $350 more. If the dry and wet handling turns out to be decent and they last for 50-60k (rated to 70k), I think I will be happy.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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2019 Accord Hybrid Touring
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138 Posts
Got the Pirelli tires installed last Saturday on my 2.0t Touring. Since then I have driven about 130 miles, mostly commuting to work and I haven’t really pushed them hard yet. Too soon to notice fuel impacts, but initial overall impressions of the tires are positive. They seem quieter than the OEM Michelins that just came off with 3/32” left at 47.1k miles. I haven’t pushed them hard into a corner yet but handling seems decent. No noticeable issues (vibrations, abnormal tracking) - so far so good. I was overall happy with the Michelins but they weren’t available and would have been ~ $350 more. If the dry and wet handling turns out to be decent and they last for 50-60k (rated to 70k), I think I will be happy. View attachment 545563
View attachment 545562
The tread pattern looks sooo nice on those Touring rims!
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
The tread pattern looks sooo nice on those Touring rims!
Agreed. I didn’t mention looks in my last posting as looks are always very subjective, but I like them. I really liked the look of the Michelins on the Accord so I was concerned that that I wouldn’t like these as much but I am happy with the way they look.
 

· 2010 2.4EX
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1,199 Posts
Agreed. I didn’t mention looks in my last posting as looks are always very
subjective, but I like them. I really liked the look of the Michelins on the
Accord so I was concerned that that I wouldn’t like these as much but I
am happy with the way they look.
When I buy tires, looks aren't even in the back of my mind.

Tires aren't about looks. They're about something else... I just can't see to put my finger on it. :unsure::unsure:
 

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2022 Accord Sport 2.0 - KTuner Stage 2
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I know that I am a bit late to the tire party, but I just got out of a 2019 Camry XSE after 82k miles into a sport 2.0. But, I had 3 different tires on that car.
1) Factory MXM4's from Michelin lasted 30k miles, great all around tire, nothing exceptional, but great overall.
2) Put on a set of Bridgestone Quiettracks, by far the most quiet sounding tire ever, its insane, lasted 40k miles, expensive AF but luckily the 80k warranty gave me a new set at 50% off. The handling in the snow was also exceptional for a grand touring tire, we had record snow fall and it hauled ass.
3) New set of Quiettracks came defective, very noisy between 45 and 50 mph. Had it rebalanced a dozen times, the noise never went away so I got rid of em and had a free set of continental DWS06+ put on. One thing I noticed is that you need to get 10mm larger than factory (so if oem tire is 235, you need 245's going continental). GRIP FOR DAYS HOLLY HELL. This is by far the best wearing and gripping tire. There is noticeable tire noise but its a very quiet wind sound, not a hum or rubbing sound on pavement, so quite pleasant for a ultra high performance all season. But the wet and dry grip is second to none and after 20k miles on that set, it went down 1mm of tread wear all 4 corners. SOLID choice and its inexpensive!

Previously on some of my cars I had continental Pure contacts, they are a super comfortable ride, but soft sidewall, so I wouldn't put them on a 19" rim, only 17 and 18. Also had Michelin Premiers, total freaking junk. They last like 10k miles at best and super inconsistent from tire to tire on multiple sets. Also had Yokohama YK740 and Ascend GT's. Superb value and although they aren't quite michelin grip (michelin can't touch continental though) they are excellent value and are not noisy.
 

· 2010 2.4EX
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One thing I noticed is that you need to get 10mm larger than factory (so if
oem tire is 235, you need 245's going continental). GRIP FOR DAYS HOLLY HELL.

Sounds counter-intuitive to me: If you want more grip in snow, you want narrower, not wider tires. Or at least, maintain the same size.

Sounds like the Continental DWS you mentioned getting bigger just aren't as good in snow as the previous tire you had on there.
 

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2022 Accord Sport 2.0 - KTuner Stage 2
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Sounds counter-intuitive to me: If you want more grip in snow, you want narrower, not wider tires. Or at least, maintain the same size.

Sounds like the Continental DWS you mentioned getting bigger just aren't as good in snow as the previous tire you had on there.
These are UHP-AS tires...what are you even on about...
 

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2022 Accord Sport 2.0 - KTuner Stage 2
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I take "UHP" to mean ultra-high-profile?

What is the size stamped on the sidewall of those tires?
UHP is ultra high performance. They come in Summer and All season variants.
The DWS06 and DWS06+ is a UHP All season (AS). And yes, all continental tires must be 10mm larger than your factory size (Unless you live in europe).
If your michelins were 235 40 19, you order continentals in 245 40 19. Simple math bruh
 

· 2010 2.4EX
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1,199 Posts
UHP is ultra high performance. They come in Summer and All season variants.
The DWS06 and DWS06+ is a UHP All season (AS). And yes, all continental tires
must be 10mm larger than your factory size (Unless you live in europe).
If your michelins were 235 40 19, you order continentals in 245 40 19. Simple
math bruh
Sorry - allergic to acronyms.

Anywho... So what you are saying is, on my wife's 2004 Toyota Corolla LE, OEM size 195-65R15, running her third set of Conti-ProContacts since 2012, that she's been running the wrong size, according to one tire manufacturer?

I'm bringing Barry on here...
 
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