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Nothing. If any change comes it will be for the 2021 Accord which would be released around September 2020. I’m driving a 9th gen and don’t have any desire updating to a 10th gen unless Honda gives a significant refresh to the rear and if the 2.4L 4 cylinder engine returns
You'll never buy a car if you keep waiting for the perfect one to be built.

Sometimes the refresh is worst than the original. Case in point is the refresh to the 8th Gen Accord rear with those cheap reflector strips simulating brake lights. Also, the 2.0 Turbo probably out performs the 2.4L engine.
 

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Also, the 2.0 Turbo probably out performs the 2.4L engine.
Probably? It's not even a question. To me it seems like those that long for the 2.4L on this board are afraid of turbo motors. The 2.4L paired with CVT in the 9th gen was absolutely dreadful to drive. I don't know how anyone could put up with that, let alone enjoy it.
 

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port & polish everything
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Discussion Starter #23
You'll never buy a car if you keep waiting for the perfect one to be built.

Sometimes the refresh is worst than the original. Case in point is the refresh to the 8th Gen Accord rear with those cheap reflector strips simulating brake lights. Also, the 2.0 Turbo probably out performs the 2.4L engine.

The 8.5G trunk reflectors were straight off the JDM Honda Inspire. Back when it was JDM only, everyone wanted them. See what happens when you give people what they couldn't have.

I still have my K24Z coupe, I still think the 2.4 are good engines, but it's probably not coming back. You can thank environmentalists for pushing paper fuel economy numbers.

CVT is another story which I do not like. The best auto 2.4 was the TLX with 8 speed DCT. Very responsive, I test drove it back to back with the Accord V6 6AT, and it felt almost as good. However the DCT will never be a mainstream transmission, probably costs Honda too much.

Stock for stock though, the 2.0T still beats any 2.4 pretty much everywhere. In PZEV states, Honda supposedly warranties most of the 2.0T engine, including the turbocharger for something like 150K miles.
 

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You'll be driving your car for the rest of your time on this planet if you're waiting for the 2.4L to come back. Not happening with fuel efficiency standards.
Never say never. The 2.4L is very much alive in 2019 CR-V LX trim (both FWD and AWD variants).

You'll never buy a car if you keep waiting for the perfect one to be built.

Sometimes the refresh is worst than the original. Case in point is the refresh to the 8th Gen Accord rear with those cheap reflector strips simulating brake lights. Also, the 2.0 Turbo probably out performs the 2.4L engine.
The 1.5T outperforms the 2.4 NA, let alone the 2.0T.
 

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I saw this on YouTube. Is the Chicago auto show accurate when it comes to showing how new cars will look?

 

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I saw this on YouTube. Is the Chicago auto show accurate when it comes to showing how new cars will look?

The video was posted in February so it’s definitely NOT a 2020 model. Case closed.
 

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Well, since we are four months away from the 2020 Accords appearing in showrooms, and we haven't seen any pics of Accords scurrying around in Arizona in padded camouflage, I guess it's safe to assume it's "No Soup for [us]!"
 

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I like our front ends more than the Inspire, but do agree the taillights on the Inspire look better. However it looks like the outer taillights are a direct swap as they are the same shape and size. If someone really wanted they could order the inspire trunk lid and taillights to make their care look like the Inspire.
 

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Someone posted the numbers here before, 2.0T 6MT compromises less than 1% of Accord production and they're heavily discounted so cost to make them vs profit is pretty deep in the negatives.
Every dealer pays Honda the same price. Big dealer, small dealer, high volume dealer, low volume dealer - doesn't matter. Honda's profit per vehicle is fixed. The dealer's profit per vehicle varies. Honda makes the same profit if dealer A sells an Accord that costs $25K for $20K as they do if dealer B sells a similar Accord for $30K. Surely, you don't think dealers share extra profit with Honda, do you? ;)
 

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I have a 2.0 EX-L and I have to agree that the sound system is pretty disappointing. It has the least amount of bass out of any car I've had since the 90s despite having an 8" subwoofer. My wife's Outback with its Harmon/Kardon sound system has gobs more bass. I'm happy with the quality of the speakers, I just wish that the sub had maybe +10db from 20hz-120hz.
 

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Any idea when the 2020s are definitively coming out?

I’m in the market for a car now. But if it’s so darn close I might as well wait and get the slightly better resale on the backend. I’m also interested to see if they add keyless entry on the Sports, would really love that with two kids around.

I’m having a whale of a time trying to get any dealer to place an order for the color/trim/manual transmission I want. Anyone know of a dealer in SoCal that will place an order for me? Seems like no one wants to bother and/or it’s difficult if not impossible.
 

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I’m having a whale of a time trying to get any dealer to place an order for the color/trim/manual transmission I want. Anyone know of a dealer in SoCal that will place an order for me? Seems like no one wants to bother and/or it’s difficult if not impossible.
Honda doesn't allow dealers to place orders for specific vehicles unlike most other automakers. A dealer can request a specific trim and color combination from the number of a particular model they are allocated for a period. They can also utilize the APEX (Allocation Preferencing and EXchange) system on the Honda iN (Honda interactive Network) to request a trade with another dealership if that other dealer is scheduled to receive the vehicle they are looking for. However, if Honda isn't making many of the specific vehicle the dealer requests, it could be a long time, if ever, before they actually receive it.

To put it another way, a Honda dealer's order doesn't automatically schedule the production of a specific vehicle at the factory like it does with most other automakers. Instead, it merely communicates the dealer's preferences and an exchange request to Honda so that the ordering dealer will be given priority to receive that specific vehicle if it is scheduled to be built.

Some Honda dealers may tell you they can special order a vehicle, but they're not telling the truth. They're just taking your money and hoping that the vehicle you want actually arrives before you give up and go somewhere else or that you'll settle for something they have on the lot.

Example:

Let's say a dealer has been allocated 100 Accords for a particular period and their order looks like this:

20 silver LX
20 white LX
20 white EX
10 blue Sport 1.5T CVT
10 red Sport 2.0T 10AT
10 silver Touring
9 white EX-L
1 black Sport 2.0T 6MT
TOTAL 100

They may receive:

15 silver LX and 5 blue LX
20 white LX
15 white EX and 5 black EX
5 blue Sport 1.5T CVT and 5 red Sport 1.5T CVT
5 red Sport 2.0T 10AT and 5 white Sport 2.0T 10AT
5 silver Touring and 5 white Touring
8 white EX-L and 1 silver EX-L
1 black Sport 2.0T 10AT
TOTAL 100

They'll still get 100 Accords and end up with most of what they want, but if Honda doesn't build enough (or any) of a particular combination to satisfy every dealer request, some dealers will receive a different trim and color.

New models are generally placed on "fixed allocation" meaning that each dealer receives only what Honda pushes out to them based on historic and predicted sales. The dealer isn't permitted to even request a specific trim and color during this fixed allocation period, which is typically 90 days into a new model release.

One reason for this method is because Honda only builds vehicles in batches of identical models. Based on preferences and requests from all dealers, the wait until they have enough to make it economical to build a batch of a specific combination. Batches of 100 white Accord EX come up fairly often. Batches of 50 red Sport 2.0T 6MT come up very rarely. If you look at a Ford plant, you'll see a mixture of colors, trims, and options rolling down the line at any given time. At a Honda factory, you'll see nothing but a string of identical models.

513972

Honda assembly line - notice every vehicle is the same

513973

Ford assembly line - notice every vehicle is different
 

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OBSIDIANBLUE
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Honda doesn't allow dealers to place orders for specific vehicles unlike most other automakers. A dealer can request a specific trim and color combination from the number of a particular model they are allocated for a period. They can also utilize the APEX (Allocation Preferencing and EXchange) system on the Honda iN (Honda interactive Network) to request a trade with another dealership if that other dealer is scheduled to receive the vehicle they are looking for. However, if Honda isn't making many of the specific vehicle the dealer requests, it could be a long time, if ever, before they actually receive it.

To put it another way, a Honda dealer's order doesn't automatically schedule the production of a specific vehicle at the factory like it does with most other automakers. Instead, it merely communicates the dealer's preferences and an exchange request to Honda so that the ordering dealer will be given priority to receive that specific vehicle if it is scheduled to be built.

Some Honda dealers may tell you they can special order a vehicle, but they're not telling the truth. They're just taking your money and hoping that the vehicle you want actually arrives before you give up and go somewhere else or that you'll settle for something they have on the lot.

Example:

Let's say a dealer has been allocated 100 Accords for a particular period and their order looks like this:

20 silver LX
20 white LX
20 white EX
10 blue Sport 1.5T CVT
10 red Sport 2.0T 10AT
10 silver Touring
9 white EX-L
1 black Sport 2.0T 6MT
TOTAL 100

They may receive:

15 silver LX and 5 blue LX
20 white LX
15 white EX and 5 black EX
5 blue Sport 1.5T CVT and 5 red Sport 1.5T CVT
5 red Sport 2.0T 10AT and 5 white Sport 2.0T 10AT
5 silver Touring and 5 white Touring
8 white EX-L and 1 silver EX-L
1 black Sport 2.0T 10AT
TOTAL 100

They'll still get 100 Accords and end up with most of what they want, but if Honda doesn't build enough (or any) of a particular model to satisfy every dealer request, some dealers will receive a different trim and color.

New models are generally placed on "fixed allocation" meaning that each dealer receives only what Honda pushes out to them based on historic data and predicted sales. The dealer isn't permitted to even request a specific trim and color during this fixed allocation period, which is typically 90 days into a new model release.

One reason for this method is because Honda only builds vehicles in batches of identical models. Based on preferences and requests from all dealers, the wait until they have enough to make it economical to build a batch of a specific trim and color. Batches of 100 white Accord EX come up fairly often. Batches of 50 red Sport 2.0T 6MT come up very rarely. If you look at a Ford assembly line, you'll see a mixture of colors, trims, and options rolling at any given time. At a Honda factory, you'll see nothing but a string of identical models.

Excellent explanation!
 

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Honda doesn't allow dealers to place orders for specific vehicles unlike most other automakers. A dealer can request a specific trim and color combination from the number of a particular model they are allocated for a period. They can also utilize the APEX (Allocation Preferencing and EXchange) system on the Honda iN (Honda interactive Network) to request a trade with another dealership if that other dealer is scheduled to receive the vehicle they are looking for. However, if Honda isn't making many of the specific vehicle the dealer requests, it could be a long time, if ever, before they actually receive it.

To put it another way, a Honda dealer's order doesn't automatically schedule the production of a specific vehicle at the factory like it does with most other automakers. Instead, it merely communicates the dealer's preferences and an exchange request to Honda so that the ordering dealer will be given priority to receive that specific vehicle if it is scheduled to be built.

Some Honda dealers may tell you they can special order a vehicle, but they're not telling the truth. They're just taking your money and hoping that the vehicle you want actually arrives before you give up and go somewhere else or that you'll settle for something they have on the lot.
So...you're saying I should go grab the '19 in my preferred configuration from the dealer 400 miles away? :)

Thanks for the awesome explanation.
 

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The above explanation jives with my experience last Fall of looking for a (2018) Accord Hybrid Touring in White Orchid Pearl, with Ivory interior. (Most of the white hybrid Tourings had black interior.) No dealer offered to order one for me, since apparently that's not how it works. They either had one on the lot (which only applied to a couple/few dealers in a 100 mile radius), or they were scheduled to receive one, once built. I ended up getting the car from a dealer that had one due to arrive in three weeks, as they agreed to a better price than the couple of dealers who had one already. (And then there was one dealer who showed the car in stock, on their web site, and the internet sales manager confirmed they had it, but when I drove 50 miles to look at the car, and potentially buy it, there was no car. Not because they had just sold it, either. They never had the car....)
 
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