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So I already know they Hybrid Touring/Sport modes get less MPG than the EX/EX-L due to rim size (17" vs 19"). My thought on this is, could this not be corrected by running a different size tire on the Touring/Sport model. i.e. 245/35r19 vs the 235/40r19. The overall diameter of the (225/50r17 is 25.9") the (245/35r19 is 25.8") whereas the 235/40r19 that comes on the Touring/Sport model is 26.4". I know the speedo would be off on the Touring/Sport by about 2mph across the board, but to get better MPG it would be worth it to me. I know I kind of answered my own question, but just looking for others opinion on if I am right or not. I also know you have to factor the weight of the wheels but would think they can't be for than 5lbs more per wheel.
 

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So I already know they Hybrid Touring/Sport modes get less MPG than the EX/EX-L due to rim size (17" vs 19"). My thought on this is, could this not be corrected by running a different size tire on the Touring/Sport model. i.e. 245/35r19 vs the 235/40r19. The overall diameter of the (225/50r17 is 25.9") the (245/35r19 is 25.8") whereas the 235/40r19 that comes on the Touring/Sport model is 26.4". I know the speedo would be off on the Touring/Sport by about 2mph across the board, but to get better MPG it would be worth it to me. I know I kind of answered my own question, but just looking for others opinion on if I am right or not. I also know you have to factor the weight of the wheels but would think they can't be for than 5lbs more per wheel.
I have a 2021 Accord Touring. I sold my 19's on Facebook marketplace and bought some 17" dealer take offs from an EX-L. I made $300 on the deal. The 17's are definitely lighter! There is no difference that I can tell in the speedometer. Definitely NOT worth recalibrating. I seriously doubt that Honda calibrates the Touring and the EX-L any differently anyway. The overall difference in tire diameter is insignificant. I am averaging 48 to 50 mpg and the ride is better. No worries about curb damage either. In 2020, the Hybrid Touring had 17's. Honda made a poor decision to change to 19's in 2021. I fixed it for them and made $300 in the trade.
Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Car Land vehicle
 

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I am trying to visualize the appearance of a larger tire on the Touring Wheels. I have a 2022 Hybrid Touring due in at the end of the month if things go well. Supposed to be in production this week.

I have a 2021 Accord Touring. I sold my 19's on Facebook marketplace and bought some 17" dealer take offs from an EX-L. I made $300 on the deal. The 17's are definitely lighter! There is no difference that I can tell in the speedometer. Definitely NOT worth recalibrating. I seriously doubt that Honda calibrates the Touring and the EX-L any differently anyway. The overall difference in tire diameter is insignificant. I am averaging 48 to 50 mpg and the ride is better. No worries about curb damage either. In 2020, the Hybrid Touring had 17's. Honda made a poor decision to change to 19's in 2021. I fixed it for them and made $300 in the trade.
View attachment 541179
$1200 for new 19” Touring Wheels and Tires was a STEAL!!!!

Did you install the bodyside molding yourself? Looks great.
 

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I have a 2021 Accord Touring. I sold my 19's on Facebook marketplace and bought some 17" dealer take offs from an EX-L. I made $300 on the deal. The 17's are definitely lighter! There is no difference that I can tell in the speedometer. Definitely NOT worth recalibrating. I seriously doubt that Honda calibrates the Touring and the EX-L any differently anyway. The overall difference in tire diameter is insignificant. I am averaging 48 to 50 mpg and the ride is better. No worries about curb damage either. In 2020, the Hybrid Touring had 17's. Honda made a poor decision to change to 19's in 2021. I fixed it for them and made $300 in the trade.
View attachment 541179
Yep. I used the 19" wheels and tires in spring/winter/fall and switched to a set of 17" OEM wheels and CrossClimate2 tires in winter and there really wasn't that much difference in terms of speedometer ratings. I drove past a few of those radar speed warning things after installing them and it seems like the speedometer was still pretty much right on. I think that the difference in overall diameter between the 17" OEM wheel and tire package and the 19" OEM wheel and tire package is less than 2%- so it wouldn't have a huge impact anyway.

So I already know they Hybrid Touring/Sport modes get less MPG than the EX/EX-L due to rim size (17" vs 19"). My thought on this is, could this not be corrected by running a different size tire on the Touring/Sport model. i.e. 245/35r19 vs the 235/40r19. The overall diameter of the (225/50r17 is 25.9") the (245/35r19 is 25.8") whereas the 235/40r19 that comes on the Touring/Sport model is 26.4". I know the speedo would be off on the Touring/Sport by about 2mph across the board, but to get better MPG it would be worth it to me. I know I kind of answered my own question, but just looking for others opinion on if I am right or not. I also know you have to factor the weight of the wheels but would think they can't be for than 5lbs more per wheel.
One other thing about those 19" wheels is that Honda usually puts Michelin MXM4 tires on them. If you live somewhere that sees more than light snow- you are going to want to get something different for winter. I live in SE Wisconsin and drove my Accord once in the snow- maybe 1-2" at most... and immediately realized that those wheels and tires are NOT designed for snow and can be downright scary... hence the reason why I got a set of the smaller wheels and put the CrossClimate2 tires on them for winter.
 

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Drumdude, you mentioned the 17’s are lighter than the 19’s. Did you weigh them by chance? I use my 17’s for winter use and they weigh a whopping 29# each. My summer wheel is a 17” flow-formed aftermarket wheel which save 10# of rotating mass per corner.

When I put the stock wheels on in falll with Michelin X-Ice tires my back feels it!
 

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@Hunter Mike - I did not weigh the 19's vs the 17's but when I exchanged them the difference was noticable. The 17's were much lighter. I found the Hybrid 17" wheels on Facebook Marketplace. They were at a different local dealer. They were dealer take off's and I paid $900 including the Michellin Energy Tires. Brand new. I live in the south so no need for snow tires.
@Sonicboom - I had the dealer install the factory body side molding when I bought the car. That was included in the car's price.

Another "after" picture with the 17's.

Wheel Car Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


I also downsized my wifes Passport wheels from 20's to 18's. Using factory wheels. Unfortunately, all Passports come with 20's for some reason. I only paid $750 for these brand new dealer take-offs with tires. They were on display in my dealers service department.

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So I already know they Hybrid Touring/Sport modes get less MPG than the EX/EX-L due to rim size (17" vs 19"). My thought on this is, could this not be corrected by running a different size tire on the Touring/Sport model. i.e. 245/35r19 vs the 235/40r19.
I avoided this question for awhile since the answer needs to be a bit technical. I tend to get a bit wordy, that the nature of the answer that is needed will make that worse. But here goes.

The short answer is that the issue is the rims, not the tires. The long answer is that there are two ways in increased rim size taxes your energy resources:
  1. The "moment of inertial."
    1. Intuitively, it takes twice as much effort to move a 20 pound mass than a 10 pound mass.
    2. But you can't apply this same intuition to 10" and 20" bicycle rims.
    3. Yes, the 20" rim typically weighs twice as much. This isn't the only effect.
    4. The analogy of mass in a rotating system is called the moment of inertia. The definition is (mass)*(radius)^2, but that needs to be applied over all parts of the wheel. The reason I used a bicycle rim as the example, is that the mass is, essentially, all at the same radius.
    5. So, using bicycle rims as an example, it takes (r2/r1)^3 times as much effort to rotate the radius r2 rim, than the r1 radius rim.
    6. A rough approximation of 19" car rims, compared to 17" rims, is that is takes 40% more effort.
  2. But maybe the bigger effect is the aerodynamic drag caused by all of that good-looking open space between the wheel hub and the rim.
    1. A significant portion of the aerodynamic drag on a car is this open space.
    2. I can't say how much this is, since it is very complicated. But I can provide an example. Tesla offers wheel covers that reduce this drag. Here is a link that shows how they increase efficiency. Note that they don't reduce all of the drag, since they still simulate spokes.
 

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I avoided this question for awhile since the answer needs to be a bit technical. I tend to get a bit wordy, that the nature of the answer that is needed will make that worse. But here goes.

The short answer is that the issue is the rims, not the tires. The long answer is that there are two ways in increased rim size taxes your energy resources:
  1. The "moment of inertial."
    1. Intuitively, it takes twice as much effort to move a 20 pound mass than a 10 pound mass.
    2. But you can't apply this same intuition to 10" and 20" bicycle rims.
    3. Yes, the 20" rim typically weighs twice as much. This isn't the only effect.
    4. The analogy of mass in a rotating system is called the moment of inertia. The definition is (mass)*(radius)^2, but that needs to be applied over all parts of the wheel. The reason I used a bicycle rim as the example, is that the mass is, essentially, all at the same radius.
    5. So, using bicycle rims as an example, it takes (r2/r1)^3 times as much effort to rotate the radius r2 rim, than the r1 radius rim.
    6. A rough approximation of 19" car rims, compared to 17" rims, is that is takes 40% more effort.
  2. But maybe the bigger effect is the aerodynamic drag caused by all of that good-looking open space between the wheel hub and the rim.
    1. A significant portion of the aerodynamic drag on a car is this open space.
    2. I can't say how much this is, since it is very complicated. But I can provide an example. Tesla offers wheel covers that reduce this drag. Here is a link that shows how they increase efficiency. Note that they don't reduce all of the drag, since they still simulate spokes.
I’ve been curious about how much the design of the rim affects overall aerodynamics of the vehicle. Any idea if the same general rule that driving at speeds at or below 40ish that rim design wouldn’t affect mpgs kind of like how we are told rolling the windows down under that speed is ok but above better to close windows and turn on ac? Hence if this was the case, and you were mostly a city driver, may not be an issue.
 
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