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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am interested in knowing if its possible to have the clutch pedal adjusted? I feel like my clutch pedal releases too high on the pedal. I drove my bro's 06 RSX-S the other day and the release point was way lower down the pedal I really liked that. It felt like my 08 Civic Si. On the Accord I can't seem to be able to get some clean shift because the pedal releases too high, IMO.

I took a pic

and it seems like there are nuts that can me loosen and there some thread in there to move the rod.

I had a clicking clutch issue at about 1000 miles and the dealer first replaced the clutch pedal itself and then they replaced the CMC.

So can I lower the release point?

Can anybody that a stick shift see if their clutch pedal rod has the same length as mine? :D
 

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Four Doors/Two Pedals
2020 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T 10AT
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I have been told in the past regarding Honda's hydraulic clutches that they are not adjustable.

That's not a definitive answer, but I've heard it from the dealers and a few mechanics.
 

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I have noticed this myself, while mine is an older generation I can push the clutch in maybe an inch and it's enough to engage the gear. All the rest of the travel in the pedal seems a little excessive.
 

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Former H Master Tech
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Typically you cannot adjust a hydraulic clutch setup... But it looks like you have threads on the end of the master cylinder shaft.

You may want to try bleed your clutch master/slave cylinders too, there may be air in the system that they didn't bleed out upon install. That would cause a soft or long pedal travel too.
 

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Honda Tech
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Every 9th gen ive driven the clutch releases really high. However I have not adjusted one. You should be able to adjust it by the nut. Just play with it and see if it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Typically you cannot adjust a hydraulic clutch setup... But it looks like you have threads on the end of the master cylinder shaft.

You may want to try bleed your clutch master/slave cylinders too, there may be air in the system that they didn't bleed out upon install. That would cause a soft or long pedal travel too.
I did end up making an adjustment and man what a difference!
Every 9th gen ive driven the clutch releases really high. However I have not adjusted one. You should be able to adjust it by the nut. Just play with it and see if it helps.
Yeah I did just that.

After some Google search I found some forums with some useful information:
The Rod Adjuster controls the engagement point. Loosen the 12mm locknot on the firewall side of bracket. Now, once the locknut is loose, the rod coming out of the master cylinder can rotate freely. Rotate the rod CCW to bring the engagement closer to the floor. Rotate the rod CW to bring the engagement point closer towards you. Do this in small adjustments of 1/2 a rotation at a time. A small adjustment here makes a big difference in the engagement point. Be sure to tighten down the locknut when you are finished.

Now that you have the correct engagement, you might now have either too much, or too little free play at the top of the pedal travel. To fix this, move to the upper adjuster. It is secured by a locknut on the driver side of the bracket. It is a big metric nut, probably 16 or 18 mm. I didn't have a wrench that big, but was able to use a pair of vice grips to loosen it. To remove freeplay, turn the entire round metal object/bolt thingy CW. This will put more threads through the bracket and remove freeplay. The opposite is also true. Do not forget to tighten down the locknut when you are finished
I still going to fine tune it but from my drive I was able to shift a lot more smoothly. Now I just have to get used to the new catch point :thumbsup:
 

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Nice find! I'm bookmarking this in case I ever decide to do the same thing. I've never even thought about tinkering with the friction point, but inexperienced as I may be, it does seem high to me. Are there any potential downsides to messing with it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice find! I'm bookmarking this in case I ever decide to do the same thing. I've never even thought about tinkering with the friction point, but inexperienced as I may be, it does seem high to me. Are there any potential downsides to messing with it?
The only downside that I have found is that you have the catch point too low to the floor it will wear out your clutch.
 

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Does this adjustment lower the release/catch point relative to the clutch pedal or just lower everything together? For example, suppose the clutch pedal’s travel from top to bottom is 10 inches and the release/catch point occurs two inches from the top. Does this adjustment keep the pedal’s travel at 10 inches and make the release/catch point happen 5 inches from the top? Or does this reduce the pedal’s travel to from 10 inches to 7 inches and keep the release/catch point at 2 inches from the top?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Does this adjustment lower the release/catch point relative to the clutch pedal or just lower everything together? For example, suppose the clutch pedal’s travel from top to bottom is 10 inches and the release/catch point occurs two inches from the top. Does this adjustment keep the pedal’s travel at 10 inches and make the release/catch point happen 5 inches from the top? Or does this reduce the pedal’s travel to from 10 inches to 7 inches and keep the release/catch point at 2 inches from the top?
To me it felt like it lowered everything together. I should had taken some measurements before doing this. I'm still going to fine tune it. My first try I rotated the pushrod ccw about 1 1/2 turns. Maybe that was too much.

I found some other useful info:


1. Loosen the 12mm nut, one with the red arrow
2. Adjust the clutch height (Blue arrow):
Turn the rod until you get the right clutch height you want.
3. Adjust clutch free play:
HOLD the clutch (don't let it move up and down) and slowly move the rod left and right to adjust clutch free play. This should be about an 1"
4. DO NOT move the rod. and slowly tighten the nut back on.
5. Test drive, and readjust if you need to

It's going to take quiet a few try to get it where you like it, so dont be frustrated :)
 

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.....does the Gen9 6-6 have the slave cylinder restrictor valve (kills clutch take-up 'feel')?

My Gen7's only flaw in 138,000 miles.

ez
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
.....does the Gen9 6-6 have the slave cylinder restrictor valve (kills clutch take-up 'feel')?

My Gen7's only flaw in 138,000 miles.

ez
Yes I believe so. It is on the slave cylinder. I wanted to try to remove that valve but I never did.
 

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Yes I believe so. It is on the slave cylinder. I wanted to try to remove that valve but I never did.
.....does the Gen9 6-6 have the slave cylinder restrictor valve (kills clutch take-up 'feel')?

My Gen7's only flaw in 138,000 miles.

ez
We have a number of Civic customers complain about the same issue. One of the best things you can do for performance driving is remove that checkvalve from the slave cylinder. For those of you who aren't aware of what we're referencing, if you have ever noticed that when you try to shift fast the clutch doesn't engage till the very top of the pedal travel, but the clutch engages much lower when you're driving slow and gentle, that is all due to the clutch delay valve.

If you're going to be opening the system to bleed it or do any other work, it's worth taking the time to disassemble the clutch slave cylinder to remove that valve. It make the engagement happen at the same point in pedal travel regardless of how slow or quickly the pedal is released. This makes the car more consistent to drive under all conditions, and therefor easier to know how it will react.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We have a number of Civic customers complain about the same issue. One of the best things you can do for performance driving is remove that checkvalve from the slave cylinder. For those of you who aren't aware of what we're referencing, if you have ever noticed that when you try to shift fast the clutch doesn't engage till the very top of the pedal travel, but the clutch engages much lower when you're driving slow and gentle, that is all due to the clutch delay valve.

If you're going to be opening the system to bleed it or do any other work, it's worth taking the time to disassemble the clutch slave cylinder to remove that valve. It make the engagement happen at the same point in pedal travel regardless of how slow or quickly the pedal is released. This makes the car more consistent to drive under all conditions, and therefor easier to know how it will react.
Cool, I will have to try that out.

I've been tweaking the release point and I have it where I really like it.
If anybody wants to try this, I would suggest you make a mark on the pushrod for reference and make adjustments in like 45 degree rotations.
 

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Does this adjustment lower the release/catch point relative to the clutch pedal or just lower everything together? For example, suppose the clutch pedal’s travel from top to bottom is 10 inches and the release/catch point occurs two inches from the top. Does this adjustment keep the pedal’s travel at 10 inches and make the release/catch point happen 5 inches from the top? Or does this reduce the pedal’s travel to from 10 inches to 7 inches and keep the release/catch point at 2 inches from the top?
To answer your question, the cruise control sensor, which acts as a stop for the pedal at the top of its travel is also adjustable. It is possible to adjust the pedal while keeping the master cylinder rod in the same position, or to adjust the MC rod while keeping the pedal in the same position using these two adjustments. It may be better to keep the MC the same (to make sure it's not bearing any added stress from being pushed in when the pedal is in the released position) and just adjust the pedal height. (Of course, to achieve this, the MC rod must be adjusted relative to the pedal to keep the MC in the same overall position. It is about 1 turn of the MC rod for every 2 turns of the cruise control switch to keep the MC in the same position when the pedal top-of-travel height is moved.)

In this sense, the clutch itself really isn't adjustable, without risking added wear from constant added pressure, but the pedal height is.
 

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Very interested in this for my Sport. Pick-up point feels too high for my tastes.
 

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I have both a Sedan Sport and a 6-6 coupe and the clutch points are completely different. The sport is VERY high, probably the highest i've noticed in a car before and the 6-6 is very low. It's a huge adjustment between cars each time I drive the other lol.
 

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My 10 Si had the engagement point about half an inch from the floor, my new 6-6 is somewhere really high and it makes driving much much harder.

I would caution against adjusting the CMC rod though, I mildly adjusted it on my Si and blew out the CMC in 20K miles.
 
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