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2014 Accord Sport 6MT CBP
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I'm relatively new manual transmission driver and find the 6MT to be very smooth (almost seems like an automatic at times) to shift. However, I am still getting used to the soft clutch and not being able to gauge the biting point all the time, I get jerkyness in traffic for either not letting the clutch go fast enough, or letting it go too fast.

Just wanted to get the opinion of more proficient manual accord drivers out there -- what are your recommendations for shift points? Should I be looking at RPM, at actual speeds, or just by listening to the engine? That is another issue -- the engine is so quiet I am not sure I can always gauge by just listening to it.

Thanks,
 

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PLATINUM PLAYER
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just practice my friend

this clutch is very forgiving and you'll be a pro in no time

I learned to drive my first stick shift car while driving it off the lot, needless to say I had to get the throwout bearing replaced but thank god it was a honda and it was done under warranty


you can watch the tach if you want to but just go by feel and sound (keep the radio off)

let off the clutch until it starts to engage than sort of ride that engagement point until youre up to speed and then fully release it
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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4,339 Posts
Hi everyone,

I'm relatively new manual transmission driver and find the 6MT to be very smooth (almost seems like an automatic at times) to shift. However, I am still getting used to the soft clutch and not being able to gauge the biting point all the time, I get jerkyness in traffic for either not letting the clutch go fast enough, or letting it go too fast.

Just wanted to get the opinion of more proficient manual accord drivers out there -- what are your recommendations for shift points? Should I be looking at RPM, at actual speeds, or just by listening to the engine? That is another issue -- the engine is so quiet I am not sure I can always gauge by just listening to it.

Thanks,
I came to my Accord from a 2011 Challenger R/T Classic. It was a good 2 months before I could get my engagements as smooth as they were in the Challenger. Now, they are very good. I even get compliments from passengers on how smooth it is. But, I do goof every once in a while so dont beat yourself up over that.

At first I was shifting when the Green bars went White. Now I go by "feel" and "engine speed" Every situation is different so it is hard to say shift at this speed or XXXX engine speed. So, now I just go with what feels right.

Keep at before you know it, it will be in your muscle memory. You will be doing with out even knowing it.

Jay
 

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shift points in city traffic is totally up to you but my self its normally around 3K and i only get into 4th around 50kmh (unless its a constant speed then ill shift into 5th)...... but get into the car and put it in first and slowly let out the clutch without touching the gas and feel the car grab and start to roll (do this on flat ground in a parking lot) this will give you the feel of the clutch .......the engagement of the clutch is tight, you can tap the clutch with your foot and quickly shift gears, sometimes i think i don't even engage the clutch when shifting lol but no need to push it to the floor creating the jerkiness you are talking about! lastly try to shift less in traffic :)
 

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shift points in city traffic is totally up to you but my self its normally around 3K and i only get into 4th around 50kmh (unless its a constant speed then ill shift into 5th)...... but get into the car and put it in first and slowly let out the clutch without touching the gas and feel the car grab and start to roll (do this on flat ground in a parking lot) this will give you the feel of the clutch .......the engagement of the clutch is tight, you can tap the clutch with your foot and quickly shift gears, sometimes i think i don't even engage the clutch when shifting lol but no need to push it to the floor creating the jerkiness you are talking about! lastly try to shift less in traffic :)
I wish my clutch was like that. It seems that there is alot more resistance in the shifter if I don't push the pedal all the way to the floor. :(
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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but get into the car and put it in first and slowly let out the clutch without touching the gas and feel the car grab and start to roll (do this on flat ground in a parking lot) this will give you the feel of the clutch ......
Aka - the "friction zone". Knowing how to manipulate this will make driving a stick so much smoother.

Jay
 

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I'm a novice too, and I've only been driving the Accord for all of 4 days, so take my advice for what it's worth.

I learned stick on a pickup that allowed me to judge when it was time to shift based on how loud the engine got, as well as when the gas pedal quit pushing me back in my seat. The Accord has a much softer ride, so the seat-of-the-pants feeling isn't as strong, but I've found that listening to the engine is very helpful. All of the gauges (tach, speedometer, even the green fuel economy rings) are a distraction and just mess me up. I'm driving around with the radio off, listening to the engine, and ignoring the gauges, and it's helping me a lot. It's starting to become an automatic response - engine gets loud (or in this case, noticeable), foot goes in the clutch, I find the next gear. I'd suggest trying the same thing and keeping your ears perked; if you're not already at the point where it's instinctive, you will be in a few days.

Once you get comfortable with how it feels and sounds when it's time to shift, then you can start focusing on tweaking your shift points for performance vs. economy. FWIW, the owner's manual has Honda's recommended manual shift points on p. 442. They're pretty close to what my experience has been, but again, I'm paying more attention to the feel and the noise than the numbers.
 

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I wish my clutch was like that. It seems that there is alot more resistance in the shifter if I don't push the pedal all the way to the floor. :(
I feel like driving my car is cheating in terms of driving a manual car haha the only thing I dislike is my second gear it has a tendency to grind but other then that all is well lol
 

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Been driving sticks for 38 years. Go by the sound. It will become second nature.

If you are really accelerating hard and might get near the redline - sure take a look at the tach. You are not supposed to look at the tach for every shift.
 

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Like many have said already, there's no one set "shift point". It's completely subjective. Are you trying to drive conservatively? Then conservative shifting is best. If you're objective is aggressive driving, then you're shift point will be just before redline on the tach. Most people who are experienced driving a stick just go by feel though. Just practice being smooth and you'll be alright.
 

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2014 Accord Sport 6MT CBP
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone for the advice. i think it will just take some practice and time to get a better more accurate feel for the clutch. While it is nice to have a forgiving clutch, sometimes I feel that the engagement point is too vague.

As far as shifting goes, I am trying to be as conservative as possible. I end up having to sit in at least 20-30 min of traffic each way to work, so I end up having to ride the car in 2nd gear until im forced to come to a complete stop, at which time I put in the clutch and shift back to 1st. I tend to ride 2nd gear even as low as 5mph so I dont get the jerkyness associated with releasing the clutch in 1st gear.

Another lingering question I had was about holding in the clutch while decelerating to a stop vs. putting the car in neutral and coasting while applying the brakes. Is there a preference for either among you guys? Are there mechanical parts of the clutch that can fail prematurely if it is ridden too often? I figure a brake pad is much easier to replace than a clutch (and probably less expensive).

I haven't got the hang of heel-toe or engine braking yet..Are there situations where either of these techniques are useful?

Thanks again,
Joel
 

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Somewhat off topic, but how is reverse going up hill? I hated it in my '98 LX. Seemed like I always got the chatters or found myself going too fast. Always backed down our friends driveway so I could go out in 1st gear and I never backed up our driveway.
 

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Thanks everyone for the advice. i think it will just take some practice and time to get a better more accurate feel for the clutch. While it is nice to have a forgiving clutch, sometimes I feel that the engagement point is too vague.

As far as shifting goes, I am trying to be as conservative as possible. I end up having to sit in at least 20-30 min of traffic each way to work, so I end up having to ride the car in 2nd gear until im forced to come to a complete stop, at which time I put in the clutch and shift back to 1st. I tend to ride 2nd gear even as low as 5mph so I dont get the jerkyness associated with releasing the clutch in 1st gear.

Another lingering question I had was about holding in the clutch while decelerating to a stop vs. putting the car in neutral and coasting while applying the brakes. Is there a preference for either among you guys? Are there mechanical parts of the clutch that can fail prematurely if it is ridden too often? I figure a brake pad is much easier to replace than a clutch (and probably less expensive).

I haven't got the hang of heel-toe or engine braking yet..Are there situations where either of these techniques are useful?

Thanks again,
Joel
Don't worry about heel/toe technique. It's really only practical (IMO) for track or canyon driving. About coming to a stop, I almost never let the car coast, but its nice sometimes in traffic. Just downshift and let the clutch out slowly and let the engine do much of the braking for you.
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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Thanks everyone for the advice. i think it will just take some practice and time to get a better more accurate feel for the clutch. While it is nice to have a forgiving clutch, sometimes I feel that the engagement point is too vague.

As far as shifting goes, I am trying to be as conservative as possible. I end up having to sit in at least 20-30 min of traffic each way to work, so I end up having to ride the car in 2nd gear until im forced to come to a complete stop, at which time I put in the clutch and shift back to 1st. I tend to ride 2nd gear even as low as 5mph so I dont get the jerkyness associated with releasing the clutch in 1st gear.

Another lingering question I had was about holding in the clutch while decelerating to a stop vs. putting the car in neutral and coasting while applying the brakes. Is there a preference for either among you guys? Are there mechanical parts of the clutch that can fail prematurely if it is ridden too often? I figure a brake pad is much easier to replace than a clutch (and probably less expensive).

I haven't got the hang of heel-toe or engine braking yet..Are there situations where either of these techniques are useful?

Thanks again,
Joel
You want to minimize the amount of time you have the clutch pedal in. Disengaging the clutch places pressure on the throw out bearing. Like anything else it could wear out sooner. When not needing to engaged I try to be in neutral as much as possible.

Jay
 

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Engine braking is helpful when going down mountains. It's really something everyone should do, even in automatics, if they find themselves going down a grade steep enough for the car to pick up much speed without hitting the gas. In my experience, this happens on 7% and steeper grades, but different cars have different characteristics. Anyway, having spent 5 years at Appalachian State, I can tell you most people in this part of the country don't do it and just ride the brake pedal all the way down the mountain. Maybe it's different in the Rockies.

As for decelerating/stopping, as a fellow newbie, I've been taught to just brake like I would in an automatic and push in the clutch just before the engine starts to run rough. I've just been holding it down from that point until I'm almost stopped, then popping it into neutral. My parents have used that technique my whole life and never seemed to burn through clutches, so my impression is that it doesn't cause an undue amount of wear.
 

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I try to be in neutral as much as possible before stopping. Think about it, an engine and clutch is more expensive than replacing break pads. But if you were to drive downhills or on snow or on wet roads then I'd prefer down shifting.

I do have a question though, on 1st-3rd gears, i do hear high rev before shifting to the next gear, completely letting off the accelerator. Is this normal?
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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I do have a question though, on 1st-3rd gears, i do hear high rev before shifting to the next gear, completely letting off the accelerator. Is this normal?
My car does this. Let off the accelerator a hair sooner before the shift. Its the engine boosting and holding RPM to burn off fuel. Its a post OBD-2 thing. My Challenger did it as well.

Jay
 
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