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Right now I am on vacation with the fam in Vegas. I drove from Los Angeles, California to Las Vegas, Nevada with 4 people in the car. When I started driving 85 to 90 on the interstate car began to feel unstable like it couldn't handle the speed (it felt like the car started veering side to side). I feel like the electric power steering is unpredictable (and more unsafe) so I feel the need to grip the wheel firmly the whole way while my palms sweat. I hear lots of wind outside from inside the cabin when all the windows are closed (I know it's a common problem with the 9th gen). As I am traveling East it seemed like the wind was traveling from North to South against the side of my car. I feel like that has to do something with it. Is the Accord built to withstand higher speeds or not? Is this normal for this car? I have the I4 Accord Sport CVT.
 

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The Shadow displaced Bug Magnet
2020 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T in Modern Steel Metallic
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OMG, this is going to remind me of HS physics.

Cross wind advanced math and some more math and unstable car no matter what.

Basically the faster forward speed you travel, the less stable the car is going to be (no matter what type of car even if it is a true sports car designed for high speeds).

And the impact of the crosswind is for a longer travel distance at the higher travel speeds...(ie a wind that last 1 second at 60 mph travel speed will impact the car's travel for X feet while that same wind at 90 mph travel speed impacts the car's travel for 1.5 * X ft).

And somewhere in all of this is something being squared and other stuff that I don't even want to think about.

Bottom line, the wind impacts a greater travel distance and the car is automatically less stable at the higher travel speed so the car really is less stable.

If the cross wind is strong enough, the car will seem unstable with a forward speed of 10 mph.

So no matter what speed you are traveling, when the car gets squirrely feeling, just drop the forward speed by 5 mph and you should feel a much more stable car.
 

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I don't necessarily think it applies to all cars or to sedans in particular. I have had several Mercedes Benzes sedans and a BMW sedan and none of them were as twitchy at high speeds or as sensitive to crosswinds as my 2014 Accord sedan. At first, I thought it was just the suspension, but in some strong crosswinds recently, I noticed that the car got pushed all over the road by the winds. I am starting to think it is a function of the large, scalloped (un-streamlined) front fairing that is making the vehicle so darty at higher speeds. I think the wind catches the scallops, pockets and hard edges. When combined with a touchy suspension,it adds up to a car that is unduly nervous over 85, especially on a windy day.
 

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I don't necessarily think it applies to all cars or to sedans in particular. I have had several Mercedes Benzes sedans and a BMW sedan and none of them were as twitchy at high speeds or as sensitive to crosswinds as my 2014 Accord sedan. At first, I thought it was just the suspension, but in some strong crosswinds recently, I noticed that the car got pushed all over the road by the winds. I am starting to think it is a function of the large, scalloped (un-streamlined) front fairing that is making the vehicle so darty at higher speeds. I think the wind catches the scallops, pockets and hard edges. When combined with a touchy suspension,it adds up to a car that is unduly nervous over 85, especially on a windy day.
You're comparing a 40k+ car to a 25k car. Of course the more expensive one is going to perform better, as it's probably designed with enthusiast driving in mind. Certainly more so than a conservative Honda sedan, which is designed for reliability and fuel efficiency.
Long story short, the accord is not intended to be driven at 90mph. Can you? Sure, it's your car. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.
 

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I don't necessarily think it applies to all cars or to sedans in particular. I have had several Mercedes Benzes sedans and a BMW sedan and none of them were as twitchy at high speeds or as sensitive to crosswinds as my 2014 Accord sedan. At first, I thought it was just the suspension, but in some strong crosswinds recently, I noticed that the car got pushed all over the road by the winds. I am starting to think it is a function of the large, scalloped (un-streamlined) front fairing that is making the vehicle so darty at higher speeds. I think the wind catches the scallops, pockets and hard edges. When combined with a touchy suspension,it adds up to a car that is unduly nervous over 85, especially on a windy day.

It applies to all aerodynamic cars, they seem to be more susceptible to wind currents. It's been an issue with the Prius for quite a while.

As cars are now spending more time in wind tunnels, this will become increasingly common. More and more, cars are sailing through the air instead of "punching a hole".
 

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JRock,

If the car is not intended to be driven over 90 mph, why does Honda bother with a 189 hp motor and offer a 268 hp motor? I am pretty sure it would do 100 mph with the old 2.2l, 130 hp motor from my '96 Accord. I sure wouldn't drive this version much over 100 (even on a track), but it should be able to do 85-90 for a few seconds without feeling like a cat on a hot tin roof. Come to think of it, my '96 may have felt more confident at 90 than does my '14!
 

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If the car is not intended to be driven over 90 mph, why does Honda bother with a 189 hp motor and offer a 268 hp motor?
189hp is overkill. Even my 166hp is overkill. The 145ish of the R18 would be perfectly adequate in the Accord. 268hp is just ridiculous.

But people like ridiculous! Ridiculous is fun. The power is there for acceleration, not for max speed.
 

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Right now I am on vacation with the fam in Vegas. I drove from Los Angeles, California to Las Vegas, Nevada with 4 people in the car. When I started driving 85 to 90 on the interstate car began to feel unstable like it couldn't handle the speed (it felt like the car started veering side to side). I feel like the electric power steering is unpredictable (and more unsafe) so I feel the need to grip the wheel firmly the whole way while my palms sweat. I hear lots of wind outside from inside the cabin when all the windows are closed (I know it's a common problem with the 9th gen). As I am traveling East it seemed like the wind was traveling from North to South against the side of my car. I feel like that has to do something with it. Is the Accord built to withstand higher speeds or not? Is this normal for this car? I have the I4 Accord Sport CVT.
Like others have said, it sounds like the cross winds were throwing the car around a bit. This can happen at any speed (I've experienced it going 45 MPH).

Not to sound preachy or anything, but if I were you I would slow down a bit on the highway. If your palms are sweating and the car feels unstable that's a pretty good sign you need to back off the accelerator a tad. The last thing you (and the passengers who are entrusting you with their lives) want is to have a serious crash.

Yes, it's a 189 HP motor that can easily exceed 100 MPH but that doesn't mean the car itself is designed for prolonged driving at those speeds. If that's the type of driving you want to do every day I'd suggest a Porsche 911. :grin
 

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I have an 8th gen V6 and up to 100 mph it feels completely solid. Granted it's much heavier in the front. But still. Also on a pretty calm day with a tiny bit of crosswind but not much.
 

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I would check that all four tires are inflated properly. Then I would suggest installing an upgraded rear sway bar. I came from a 2006 Acura TL to a 2014 Touring and couldn't believe how poorly the Touring handled in comparison. After just two months I installed the Acura TSX rear bar and handling improved noticeably with ZERO problems.
 

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Crosswind buffeting varies from car to car. My 9th gen Accord comes across as a bit below average wrt that but not really bad/uncontrollable at speed. I suspect four adults with no doubt a full load in the trunk makes handling less stable with the heavier rear bias and with the undersized rear sway bar this car comes with. Mine, with the Progress 22mm upgrade, just the driver, and a trunk full of luggage is dead stable at 100+ tho my u&c highway speed is 80 - 85.
 

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Don't even have any issues in Vmax driving. It's a little lighter than previous generations, but I think it's a combination of the EPS and the switch to MacStruts in the front. :)
 

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I know this thread is a year old but I just want to say that I know exactly what he is talking about with the electric power steering acting unpredictable at higher speeds. You don't feel that connection or feedback with the front wheels like you would in a car with a regular hydraulic setup and with Honda's system specifically it feels like one little hiccup could send you flying off the roadway. I think most of the problem relates to the tuning and the responsiveness of the electric power steering. This car does have a relatively stiff suspension and stable chassis, but the steering turns the wheels so far and so fast with practically no effort. If it had hydraulic steering I'm sure it would feel better out on the highway.
 

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I do not have the slightest idea what people are talking about in this thread.

First of all, 85mph is not particularly fast. Last week I was on a little road trip with the family in our Odyssey, and I was cruising at 85mph for hours, in perfect comfort with no issues, along with most everybody else on the road.

Now, as far as the Accord is concerned, that car is perfectly fine and stable at any speed it can reach. As far as I know (haven't really had a chance to try) the car will go to about 130-140mph (at least the V6 will), and it is perfectly safe and comfortable to drive at that speed. There is nothing wrong with its electric steering either, and stability of the car has next to nothing to do with the steering system used in any case. That's a function of the suspension geometry, which is well understood for decades now. Long story short, there's nothing wrong with the Accord's suspension or steering, and it is perfectly safe to drive at any legal speed.
 

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Driving at 90 mph in heavy crosswinds is like driving 90 mph in rain. Poor judgement. To decry a car’s feel in those conditions is probably unfair.

In Accordsport’s post he also stated he was on vacation with four people in the car. That probably meant four suitcases, extra bags and a fully loaded car. A fully loaded car, with most of that extra weight in the trunk and rear seat will compress the rear suspension. That can change aerodynamics and contribute to front-end lift at higher speeds. Front-end lift will make the steering feel light and unstable. Add this to strong crosswinds and it is very plausible the Accord drove poorly at high speeds on that day. Forgive my criticism, but that sounds like operator error to me.

While I would never elevate the Accord’s road feel to that of a Mazda6 or VW GTI let alone a BMW, it is more than capable of handling “Montana highway speeds” safely.
 
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