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I'm driving an 09 Accord V6. NGK seems to say not to use anti seize on their plugs... Honda says to use a small amount of anti seize and torque to 13ft pounds.. I assume that is a lower than normal value to do the anti seize. What do you guys go with? I was planning to go by the Honda manual.
 

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I used anti seize and torque specs in service manual.
 

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On my 2010 I4 I went with NGK and didn't put anti-seize. I took the plugs out a few times after that with zero issues. I didn't use a torque wrench, just snugged them up.
 
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Honda V6 Service Manual states anti-seize and 13 lb-ft. Oddly, I checked my Haynes manual and it says 13lb-ft for 4-cylinder and 16lb-ft for V6.
 

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I've always used anti-seize and torque specs, never had an issue.
 

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Like @WiiMaster, I've never used anti-seize and have never had an issue. Although I did torque everything to spec.
 
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I used NGK (factory matching) at 100k mi and I don't remember using a torque wrench (have it, but don't recall using it and usually don't for spark plugs). 90k miles later it's time to do spark plugs again based on mileage (runs fine). I use a torque wrench when doing engine internals, but snugging up a spark plug is usually just fine for daily drivers. i assume they were torqued to spec at the factory.

If you're used to working on cars, you get a feel for what the length of the wrench/ratchet gives you. you consider what it took to loosen them and reapply that force when tightening. I'm guessing less than 0.00001% of replacement spark plugs in existence have been torqued to spec. If loose, you'll lose compression. If tight, it may be pita to remove. if you're a novice, it's unlikely you own a torque wrench anyway. if you have one, you should use it, no reason not to.

when i removed the plugs there was no evidence of anti-seize from the factory. I did use anti-seize on the replacement plugs. we'll see what I encounter with set #3.
 

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I just tightened it until it stopped, then went 45-90 degrees past that.
 

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A dab of anti seize and using a lint free towel spread it evenly on the threads not getting it on the tip. Tighten to specs. NOTE! Only do when motor is cold. Damage to head will happen. If taken out hot the spark plug hole while cooling down will shrink & or distort
 

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Never never install a spark plug into a head without anti-seize. NEVER. For one.. it keeps the hard steel threads from gauling the soft aluminum. This is the same for ANY steel fasteners going into aluminum.
And the other.. It'll make changing them next time easier.
ALWAYS use anti-seize unless a thread locker is specified. And if you're one of those "yeah well I never had any problems" guys.. stay away from my car.
 

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Never never install a spark plug into a head without anti-seize. NEVER. For one.. it keeps the hard steel threads from gauling the soft aluminum. This is the same for ANY steel fasteners going into aluminum.
And the other.. It'll make changing them next time easier.
ALWAYS use anti-seize unless a thread locker is specified. And if you're one of those "yeah well I never had any problems" guys.. stay away from my car.
I'm more inclined to listen to the company that makes the actual plug. If their recommendation was causing problems, I'm sure we'd know by now.
 

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^^^that. NGK makes the plugs, they should know their product. I've never needed anti-seize on my NGK's. Last year, after about 100,000 miles with no anti-seize, they came out like they were installed the day before.
 

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Use anti-seize, I have done so across 2 cars and over 500k miles and I use only Denso Iridium power so I change them every 30k miles. That must be 17 different sets I've used anti-seize on. Just a dab of it, not a big glob, the torque value does not change much with just a little bit.
 

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NOTE! Only do when motor is cold. Damage to head will happen. If taken out hot the spark plug hole while cooling down will shrink & or distort
This is a myth.
Almost no mechanic is going to wait for an engine to cool before pulling plugs. I have pulled literally 100s of plugs from hot aluminum heads. Never once an issue. Cool is preferable to avoid burns though
 

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I never use anti-seize. In fact, NGK specifically says no anti-seize for my Subaru.
 

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Anti-seize does change torque specs which is why not recommended. I did have a problem with my Jeep losing a plug due to excessive use of anti-seize from some previous owner. Was driving around on 5 plugs with one just floating around.

I do agree that if you apply some anti-seize; make sure to only add a little where the top of the threads will be affected by the outside elements.
This debate will be going on as long as gasoline engines internally ignite our lives.
 

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07V6 EX-L Chicago
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I'm driving an 09 Accord V6. NGK seems to say not to use anti seize on their plugs... Honda says to use a small amount of anti seize and torque to 13ft pounds.. I assume that is a lower than normal value to do the anti seize. What do you guys go with? I was planning to go by the Honda manual.
You should go by Honda manual. Applying anti-seize vs dry install have different torque specs. Honda's 13 ft-lb already takes anti-seize into consideration, for all OE plugs, NGK and Denso

If not using anti-seize, you have to figure out a torque spec for NGK, and risking damaging the threads next time. Why???
 
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