Drive Accord Honda Forums banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Once I drive a new car off the lot, it doesn't go back to the dealer for service. I don't go back unless something breaks that's under warranty. When the MM money grab light comes on for service, I clear it immediately.
Oil change was doing every 7.5k miles. Now every 5k because we park and eat in the car a lot since Covid-19.
ATF every 30k in the 5-speeds. Nursing my 6-speed Pilot ATF.
Timing Belt Water Pump job with serp belt (inspect serp belt pully/tensioner) and coolant flush 90k.
PS fluid, when it turns dark.
Brake fluid flush, when I need pads.
 

·
MT or death
Joined
·
125 Posts
I don't understand why people are willing to spend $30,000 on a car but then argue that spending $150 on regular maintenance is a 'scam' or a 'ripoff'.
It's really not hard to understand that paying about $100 for what amounts to a free generic safety inspection in most states is probably a rip-off, not "regular maintenance." I don't know what your financial situation is, but I'd rather not donate $100 to a dealership that I don't have to. "Inspecting" these items is something they'll likely do while the car is having its oil changed anyway.
 

·
07V6 EX-L Chicago
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
...
If maintenance is only being done once or twice a year, it's a good idea to have those inspections done just to be sure everything is working as intended. I don't understand why people are willing to spend $30,000 on a car but then argue that spending $150 on regular maintenance is a 'scam' or a 'ripoff'.
I think OP's logic is: they charge $150 for essentially the same service they performed for $66. Those visual inspections are offered at almost any shops/dealerships for free (hoping to get more work).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
I think OP's logic is: they charge $150 for essentially the same service they performed for $66. Those visual inspections are offered at almost any shops/dealerships for free (hoping to get more work).
I get an oil/filter change only from my dealer for $55. They give me a multi point inspection each time with like 30 things including everything in the B1 service and it shows the status of each item Red/Yellow/Green. Do they actually do these inspections? Who knows. Will they do it if you pay $150? Who knows.

Not suggesting you don't service your car properly but I don't think it's worth $150. Even less so when you can a) inspect them yourself easily and b) the car only has 12k miles.

And as to whether or not my dealer does the inspections, I think they probably do something. They've noted when engine/cabin filters were dirty and I looked and they were.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,442 Posts
Once I drive a new car off the lot, it doesn't go back to the dealer for service. I don't go back unless something breaks that's under warranty. When the MM money grab light comes on for service, I clear it immediately.
Oil change was doing every 7.5k miles. Now every 5k because we park and eat in the car a lot since Covid-19.
ATF every 30k in the 5-speeds. Nursing my 6-speed Pilot ATF.
Timing Belt Water Pump job with serp belt (inspect serp belt pully/tensioner) and coolant flush 90k.
PS fluid, when it turns dark.
Brake fluid flush, when I need pads.
Finally someone with sense.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Andrew O

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,408 Posts
Finally someone with sense.
And because of THAT, he probably has a whole lotta cents more than the average bear....

I always wonder about those Consumer Reports-type evaluations that say "Maintenance on this model will be much more expensive than maintenance on that model." Where do they come up with these "cost of ownership" determinations? Do they base it on what dealers charge, and use "dealer recommends" service intervals?
 
  • Like
Reactions: qman

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,442 Posts
I always wonder about those Consumer Reports-type evaluations that say "Maintenance on this model will be much more expensive than maintenance on that model." Where do they come up with these "cost of ownership" determinations? Do they base it on what dealers charge, and use "dealer recommends" service intervals?
You and me both. I can vouch that 90s Ford anything will cost you arms and legs though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I always wonder about those Consumer Reports-type evaluations that say "Maintenance on this model will be much more expensive than maintenance on that model." Where do they come up with these "cost of ownership" determinations? Do they base it on what dealers charge, and use "dealer recommends" service intervals?
I'd imagine they'd use average dealer pricing for the factory-recommended service schedule. Knowing that many dealers attempt to tack on "recommended" services, the only way to provide a consistent comparison among brands and vehicles is to use the factory (not dealer) recommended service schedule.

That used to be an easy thing. My 2007 Camry came with a booklet with the factory-recommended services up until like 150,000 miles. I guess after 150,000 miles you were on your own. With modern cars and their fancy computers that adjust maintenance based on driving habits, estimating service costs is probably a bit more challenging.



Both of my cars go to my local trusted mechanic twice per year for an oil/filter change, tire rotation, and detailed inspection. It usually costs me about $90 bucks per car. More than the cheap $45 that my Honda dealer charges for an oil change- but I'd rather pay $90 to have someone that I trust give my car a detailed inspection. I know that my mechanic will do it right. Will the 19 year-old junior tech working at the Honda dealership for $10/hour take the time to do it right? Maybe. Maybe not. The knowledge and expertise my mechanic brings to the table is worth the slightly higher cost. Education, experience, and trustworthiness are all things that I'm willing to pay a little bit more for. Competent mechanics deserve to be paid accordingly.

The way I look at it- I paid $28,000 for my Camry back in 2007 and about the same for my 2019 Accord. Paying $400 per year to keep them in tip-top shape is worth it.

Can the original poster save a little bit of money by skipping the B1 service? Probably. That said- I'd much rather have my mechanic do a good inspection of my car while it's under warranty to look for potential issues rather than wait until the car has 36,001 miles on it and suddenly has a failure that's experienced after the warranty expires.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RickBlaine

·
The Shadow displaced Bug Magnet
2020 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T in Modern Steel Metallic
Joined
·
490 Posts
I get an oil/filter change only from my dealer for $55. They give me a multi point inspection each time with like 30 things including everything in the B1 service and it shows the status of each item Red/Yellow/Green.
Bingo. Same here.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
I got a trusted mechanic. He likes things with carburetors.

I got another trusted mechanic. He will fix anything. Like Cecil fixing the cat (SNL reference). Unless it is electrical. Or involves plastic. Or produces heat.

All joking aside, the problem with trusted mechanics is that we don't hire them enough to know their limitations and random people on yelp isn't always reliable. Fortunately my local guys are good at refusing to try something outside their skill set and referring me to somebody more specialized.

Of course that was in the past. I haven't seen the inside of private garage (or really the dealer's garage) since I started buying Hondas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
Dealer explained that the "the parking brake adjustment and suspension inspection are most of the cost difference". Do I really need a parking brake adjustment?
There are no adjustments required or even possible on the electric parking brake.

Mechanical parking brakes can require adjustment as the brake shoes wear and/or cable stretches. Electric parking brakes use a rotary actuator that holds the existing brake pads against the rotor. The actuator runs until the current consumption of the motor reaches a programmed value indicating that the required braking force has been applied then stops. Basically, electric parking brakes "self adjust" each time they are applied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I just got my B1 service for my 2018 Hybrid Touring, at around 16,000 miles (it's my second oil change). I basically asked for an engine oil and filter change, plus a tire rotation, as "a la carte" services. The service advisor indicated that since they inspect a fair amount of things as part of their basic oil change service, about the only thing I wasn't getting (versus asking for the "B1 service") was inspection of brake pad thickness, calipers, etc.

When I got the bill, he had written it up as A1 service, in terms of pricing. (When they do an A1 service, they also change the oil filter, not just the oil.)

They have super-low pricing on basic oil and filter changes, as well as on tire rotation - the total was just under $60, including tax. (Honda full-syn 0W20 oil).

My maintenance minder seems to have been reset properly, afterwards - at least the oil life is back to 100%. I also put in a new engine air filter and also the cabin dust/pollen filter myself, even though not really called for yet. We've had a lot of smoke and ash in the air, from wildfires, and both filters were pretty dirty. I then reset the number 2 maintenance minder (covers both air filters) myself.

I think my next maintenance minder notice will just be for another A1 service, as far as I can tell.... I basically plan on doing air filter changes every other oil change, which so far would be about every 16,000 miles.

As a side comment - I expect the brake pads to last quite a long time, as with the Hybrid model, most light braking is provided by regenerative braking, and the actual brake pads only come into play with either heavy braking, or at the very end of light braking, when close to a full stop. You can sometimes tell when the transition from regenerative braking to the regular brakes occurs, if you really pay attention, but it is pretty seamless....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
I think OP's logic is: they charge $150 for essentially the same service they performed for $66. Those visual inspections are offered at almost any shops/dealerships for free (hoping to get more work).
Yup. pretty much this.

For a 2019 Accord, here's the difference between an A1 and B1 Service:
Link to Maintenance Minder Codes for your Accord:
Letter Codes
Number Codes

A1:
-Oil change (no filter change)
-Tire rotation

B1:
-Oil and filter change
-Front and rear brake inspection
-Inspect tie rods ends, steering gearbox, and gearbox boots
-Check steering linkage and boots
-Inspect and tighten suspension components if necessary
-Inspect all fluids
-Inspect exhaust system
-Inspect fuel lines and connections

$150 seems to be a reasonable price for a B1 inspection. All dealers in my area charge between $200 and $225 for a B1 on an Accord.

Do the B1 service. You said that it's been a year since you've done the A1 service. Essentially, you are going to end up spending $150 for a year's worth of maintenance on a car that you spent roughly $30,000 on. You bought a nice car- maintain it according to the maintenance minder's recommendations.

With 12,000 miles on the odometer- odds are that everything will check out okay- but you never know. Inspecting these components will ensure that your car is operating properly. Spend the extra $90 and have your car maintained per the maintenance minder. Just don't be surprised if your dealer recommends an alignment while they are servicing it. Refuse it unless there are signs that your car's alignment is out of spec- like uneven tire wear, drifting to one side, or some other obvious sign.

You spent 30 grand on a car. Don't cheap out on the maintenance.

Those links you provided to the number and letter codes, no longer work.

I just got my B1 service for my 2018 Hybrid Touring, at around 16,000 miles (it's my second oil change). I basically asked for an engine oil and filter change, plus a tire rotation, as "a la carte" services. The service advisor indicated that since they inspect a fair amount of things as part of their basic oil change service, about the only thing I wasn't getting (versus asking for the "B1 service") was inspection of brake pad thickness, calipers, etc.

When I got the bill, he had written it up as A1 service, in terms of pricing. (When they do an A1 service, they also change the oil filter, not just the oil.)

They have super-low pricing on basic oil and filter changes, as well as on tire rotation - the total was just under $60, including tax. (Honda full-syn 0W20 oil).

My maintenance minder seems to have been reset properly, afterwards - at least the oil life is back to 100%. I also put in a new engine air filter and also the cabin dust/pollen filter myself, even though not really called for yet. We've had a lot of smoke and ash in the air, from wildfires, and both filters were pretty dirty. I then reset the number 2 maintenance minder (covers both air filters) myself.

I think my next maintenance minder notice will just be for another A1 service, as far as I can tell.... I basically plan on doing air filter changes every other oil change, which so far would be about every 16,000 miles.

As a side comment - I expect the brake pads to last quite a long time, as with the Hybrid model, most light braking is provided by regenerative braking, and the actual brake pads only come into play with either heavy braking, or at the very end of light braking, when close to a full stop. You can sometimes tell when the transition from regenerative braking to the regular brakes occurs, if you really pay attention, but it is pretty seamless....
This is what I ended up doing. I set my appointment for my "B1" service, but I am just asking for oil/filter change and tire rotation. Basically doing A1 again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
The ownership rule I chose to follow is this: If a brand new car is still within its 3-year/36,000-mile limited warranty period, I grin and bear the cost of whatever the maintenance minder coughs up. Once either one of those has been reached, I do what I want to have done on the car. That includes insisting on A instead of B, unless the car's odometer is nearing the 30K-interval mark. Those inspection blah-blahs, how do we really know if those techs did indeed check the items listed in the service manual? My recent experience is that no they probably don't. Because my parking brake was still "loose" even after giving in to that B service. Had to complain and raise my voice a little just to prove my point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
The ownership rule I chose to follow is this: If a brand new car is still within its 3-year/36,000-mile limited warranty period, I grin and bear the cost of whatever the maintenance minder coughs up. Once either one of those has been reached, I do what I want to have done on the car. That includes insisting on A instead of B, unless the car's odometer is nearing the 30K-interval mark. Those inspection blah-blahs, how do we really know if those techs did indeed check the items listed in the service manual? My recent experience is that no they probably don't. Because my parking brake was still "loose" even after giving in to that B service. Had to complain and raise my voice a little just to prove my point.
This is why it's important to know a trustworthy, experienced mechanic. The dealership is probably the very last place where I'd go for routine maintenance. You usually have no idea who is actually working on your car. Is it someone who knows what they are doing- or someone who is nineteen who just got hired yesterday? Who knows. Warranty work- sure, the dealer is the place to go. For everything else- use a trustworthy, experienced mechanic and save your receipts just in case a warranty issue pops up and you need to prove that you've done the maintenance.

I'll repeat what I said before. I really don't understand how some people are willing to pay $30,000 for a car but then want to cheap out on the maintenance. If the experts and Honda recommend a brake inspection (via a maintenance minder code), why not follow that recommendation? If you find an independent shop that will do that for free when you pay for an oil change? Awesome! Make sure that it's noted in the paperwork. If not, pay them to do it.

If you are worried that your mechanic isn't actually doing the work that you are paying them for- you need to find a new mechanic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mtts60

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
This is why it's important to know a trustworthy, experienced mechanic. The dealership is probably the very last place where I'd go for routine maintenance. You usually have no idea who is actually working on your car. Is it someone who knows what they are doing- or someone who is nineteen who just got hired yesterday? Who knows. Warranty work- sure, the dealer is the place to go. For everything else- use a trustworthy, experienced mechanic and save your receipts just in case a warranty issue pops up and you need to prove that you've done the maintenance.

I'll repeat what I said before. I really don't understand how some people are willing to pay $30,000 for a car but then want to cheap out on the maintenance. If the experts and Honda recommend a brake inspection (via a maintenance minder code), why not follow that recommendation? If you find an independent shop that will do that for free when you pay for an oil change? Awesome! Make sure that it's noted in the paperwork. If not, pay them to do it.

If you are worried that your mechanic isn't actually doing the work that you are paying them for- you need to find a new mechanic.
I'm not disputing those things need to be checked. I am disputing the $150 cost vs $66 cost for the A1 service at the dealership. I dont look at it like, "I spent $30,000 for a car, so what is the big deal about a $150 service". I look at it like "Am I being price gouged on this $150 service?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I'm not disputing those things need to be checked. I am disputing the $150 cost vs $66 cost for the A1 service at the dealership. I dont look at it like, "I spent $30,000 for a car, so what is the big deal about a $150 service". I look at it like "Am I being price gouged on this $150 service?"
That's a fair point. If you feel that your dealership is not charging a fair price, shop around or find a trustworthy independent mechanic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
That's a fair point. If you feel that your dealership is not charging a fair price, shop around or find a trustworthy independent mechanic.
Yeah, my previous car was an Audi A5 and while I loved it, the reliability issues and crazy maintenance costs eventually got tiresome, especially after the "new cool car high" wore off, hence, why I got rid of it and bought this Accord. Was looking for something reliable and low maintenance, which is why I was being a stickler about the $150 service...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Funny I had the same question when I did my first paid B1 service sometime ago. I bit the bait and went for the B service just to see if I get a more complete inspection report or if they do anything additional. Turns out they pour a can of BG 44k in the gas tank for the extra $$$ of the B service. I can verify this with the spillage around the gas filler port.

On the inspection report, I somehow gained some tire tread after driving 5000 miles:unsure:. It must be the tire dressing working its magic. They measured my brake pad thickness which they didn't do for the previous A service, which makes me question if they actually performed tire rotation last time.
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top