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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I only buy Accords :). My previous one was a 2004 V6 - I absolutely loved it and drove it for over 200 k miles. My current car is a 2017 LX. It’s beautiful IMHO, though I never stopped missing the extra two cylinders… Somewhat contrary to this last statement :), I’m now considering a slightly used 10th gen with 2.0T. Would greatly appreciate inputs from those who own one (I mean - with any engine, not just two liter): what do you think reliability-wise? How common are those scary stories you read in negative reviews (jerky transmissions, awful dash rattles, electronics going crazy, etc., etc.)? Any “bad” years to avoid? Thanks in advance.
 

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Accords are generally pretty reliable. With that said, no car is perfect- especially mass produced mainstream cars. Every once and a while Honda, like everyone else, produces a dud that is going to have issues.

I think that it's good advice to avoid the first year of any generation. Honda is better than most, but there can be first-year issues that are usually sorted out by the second and third year of a production run. TSBs are often issued to resolve those early issues- but they are not recalls and they are not fixed for free once the warranty expires.

I don't think that any are 'bad' years per say- but I'll tell you this- unless you are looking at an example with a fair amount of miles- it might make more sense to buy new rather than used... even it it means that you have to settle for a car without some of the options that you may like. In most markets, 2018+ Accords are being sold for near (or even above) their original MSRPs. If that's the case, you might as well just buy a new one and benefit from a full warranty. Usually you'll get a better interest rate with a loan if you buy new vs used too.

With all of that said- I think the sweet spot in the lineup if you are hoping for more power than your 2017 LX is the Sport 2.0t trim level. It's about $34,000 new with destination- and it has almost all of the features that people want minus leather. It has the 2.0t engine and 10-speed automatic- which seems to be a reliable engine- at least so far. There have been a few complaints about the 10-speed automatic, but overall it seems like most people are satisfied. In terms of dash rattles, I haven't had any in my 2021 Touring and I didn't have any in my 2019 Sport 2.0t. I didn't have any in my 2016 Accord Coupe either. Rattles are tough though- they can appear suddenly after temperature swings and they can be hard to diagnose and fix. With any mainstream car like the Accord, you can test drive one to see if it has any rattles- but as soon as the weather changes they can appear as the different materials in the cabin expand and contract with the temperature. My three Accords were much better than the various Toyotas that I've owned though.

In terms of in-car electronics going crazy- well, that's another thing entirely. There are a lot of electronics in any 2018+ Accord- specifically HondaSensing. They can act up from time-to-time- sometimes to no fault of the car itself. If you are driving in winter and sleet and snow cover the front sensor that's in the lower front bumper- that's going to light up the dashboard with warnings about how radar cruise, automatic braking, and a few other things are disabled. If you get an EXL or Touring or opt for the optional parking sensors in a lower trim car- they too will display warning messages if they get clogged with snow or dirt. Generally though- those safety systems work pretty well on the Accord. There aren't a lot of false warnings and the best part is that you can turn most of it off if you want- granted you have to turn them off each time you start the car. Some early buyers of the 2.0t model have complained about how the car will suddenly display lots of warning messages when you drive in the heavy rain on the highway- and I think that people sourced the problem to water making its way into the air system which resulted in the engine's air filter getting wet. I'm not sure if Honda redesigned it or solved the issue or not- but I've driven on the highway in the pouring rain many times- both in my 2019 and 2021 Accords- both of which had the 2.0t engine... and I've never had an issue. I think the biggest electronics gremlin that people have complained about with the 2021-2022 Accords is that sometimes Wireless Apple Carplay and Android Auto can sometimes fail to connect. Otherwise, electronic complaints about the 2021-2022 Accords have been minimal on this forum... it seems like most complaints were with the first year or two of the generation.

In regards to the 1.5t motor- some early owners of the 10th Gen Accord complained or expressed concern with oil dilution. Honda admitted that there was an issue with the 1.5t motor in the Civic and CRV, but I'm not sure if they ever admitted that there was an issue with the motor's application in the Accord. I think the fix for the CRV and Civic involved reprogramming the engine's computer so that the car warmed up faster, as the problem seemed to happen when the car was driven for short distances in colder temperatures. Someone else might be able to provide guidance in regards to the issue and if it was a problem in 2018 or 2019 Accords equipped with the 1.5t motor. The CVT transmission used in Accords with the 1.5t motor seems to be excellent.

Hybrids are a whole different ball of wax- and there are many others in the forum that could probably give you better feedback of that powertrain.

One last thing- I'd imagine that a 2018+ Accord with either engine would likely be more reliable than your already reliable 2017 Accord LX. The 9th Generation Accord had two things that often caused issues- both impacted the LX. The first issue involved the fact that Honda put weak starters in those cars... and there are lots of stories of them failing prematurely. Luckily, it's a somewhat cheap repair that most mechanics can fix pretty easily. Second issue was the fact that Honda put really lousy batteries into 4 cylinder Accords back then... really bad ones. Honda still isn't known for putting in decent batteries- but I haven't heard nearly as many 'my battery suddenly died' posts in the 10th Generation forum as I do in the 9th generation forum.

It's still good advice to have your battery inspected at the two-year mark and maybe every six months or year after that to ensure that you won't suddenly be stranded.

It's also important to note that all 2018+ Accords use a timing chain compared to a belt. This is great- especially for people who want more power- as the V6 that Honda used before 2018 in the Accord used a timing belt that wasn't cheap to replace every 100,000 miles.
 

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My 2018 Accord 2.0T EX-L has 31,000 mi. It's been reliable. One issue at 13,000 miles with CMBS was resolved with a software update. Two recalls: Rear camera software update & BCM software update.
 

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I’ve owned my 2018 LX since the first week the 10th generation Accord went on sale. I’ve driven Accords since 1986 and this 18 is my third one. My 87 Lx-i Hatchback had over 300 thousand miles with regular maintenance and one clutch replacement. My 97 LX 270 thousand with regular and me saying one Sunday, I need to get my timing belt changed and that next morning it broke needing some head work. What a leap in technology between the 97 and 18. At just over 400 miles my car braked hard as I was driving and my dashboard lit up with see your dealer and the car went into limp mode. Luckily I was just driving away from home. After this happened two times they replaced the front radar unit and it hadn’t happened since. Honda also lost their way in seating comfort, two hours into my first road trip in the 18 had me wishing for my 87 or 97 seat. Noise, vibration and harshnesses also don’t live up to my 87 and 97. It’s a better car overall, but the 87s wishbone suspension driving dynamics and the 97s comfort are missed.


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All comments are much appreciated! It has been a great discussion. I am a loyal Honda fan myself. I don’t want to say anything negative about “the other” Japanese manufacturer (hint: the name starts with a “T” :)), but whenever my wife and I rented a Camry, it felt like it’s literally hard to keep on course at highway speeds. Our Hondas, however, feel as stable as if they were riding on rails. However, I try not to let brand perception cloud my judgement: one does have to analyze specific models and even years. Anyhow, I’m really looking forward to test driving the 2.0T to see if it will heal my longing for that extra power missing in my LX :).

And generally I also prefer new to used (so far all our Hondas have been purchased new). However, there are two factors involved here: (1) the trade-in offer I got from this particular dealer is literally almost as much as what I originally paid for my new LX (other offers I got are much lower); (2) I could easily get a new 1.5 Accord for close to what I may end up paying for this slightly used one, but NOT 2.0T (and the latter is basically the purpose of the exercise). I can definitely wait for the current market madness to subside, but then there will go my good trade-in offer… So looks like my bottom line is roughly the same, whether I buy now or wait for the market to calm down.
 

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I second the comments regarding the used market. I bought my new '21 in August and literally paid $1,200 more than used for it. I had to wait for it, but it was worth it to get a new car.

And generally I also prefer new to used (so far all our Hondas have been purchased new). However, there are two factors involved here: (1) the trade-in offer I got from this particular dealer is literally almost as much as what I originally paid for my new LX (other offers I got are much lower); (2) I could easily get a new 1.5 Accord for close to what I may end up paying for this slightly used one, but NOT 2.0T (and the latter is basically the purpose of the exercise). I can definitely wait for the current market madness to subside, but then there will go my good trade-in offer… So looks like my bottom line is roughly the same, whether I buy now or wait for the market to calm down.
That makes sense. I my case, I was trading a 15-year-old car with 200K miles on it. As you might imagine, they weren't very generous with the trade offer! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually, that brings up an interesting question. I looked at the “10th generation price paid” thread, and most folks seem to have purchased new 2.0T Accords for $31-32 k plus TTL (including recently). Where are such prices to be found?… I’m in TX and we likely only have, like, three to five 2.0Ts in stock in the entire state… And those are more like $37-40 k before TTL… Maybe it got particularly crazy in the past couple of weeks? Actually, if it was $31,000-32,000, I would gladly consider doing the purchase and trade-in at different places, tax or no tax…
 

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Actually, that brings up an interesting question. I looked at the “10th generation price paid” thread, and most folks seem to have purchased new 2.0T Accords for $31-32 k plus TTL (including recently). Where are such prices to be found?… I’m in TX and we likely only have, like, three to five 2.0Ts in stock in the entire state… And those are more like $37-40 k before TTL… Maybe it got particularly crazy in the past couple of weeks? Actually, if it was $31,000-32,000, I would gladly consider doing the purchase and trade-in at different places, tax or no tax…
Most of the dealers in this area are advertising the cars at MSRP, but when you get to the lot, you discover that they have already added $3-4K worth of "dealer add-ons" that you are also forced to purchase. I got lucky in that my car was a dealer exchange car that my sales person sold me before it could go through the shop for those add-ons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Most of the dealers in this area are advertising the cars at MSRP, but when you get to the lot, you discover that they have already added $3-4K worth of "dealer add-ons" that you are also forced to purchase. I got lucky in that my car was a dealer exchange car that my sales person sold me before it could go through the shop for those add-ons.
Yes, that was my impression too - such prices for new 2.0Ts are more of an exception these days. Or maybe the situation is better somewhere farther away, like on the East Coast? I only know what’s happening here and in neighboring states, to which I initially tried to extend my search (actually, at first I did try hard to shop for new cars). However, instead of drive-out quotes I’m getting tons of spam and phone calls with invitations to “come visit our dealership”; whatever for - to be quoted $5 k to $10 k (or more) over MSRP? Thanks but no thanks…
 

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Actually, that brings up an interesting question. I looked at the “10th generation price paid” thread, and most folks seem to have purchased new 2.0T Accords for $31-32 k plus TTL (including recently). Where are such prices to be found?… I’m in TX and we likely only have, like, three to five 2.0Ts in stock in the entire state… And those are more like $37-40 k before TTL… Maybe it got particularly crazy in the past couple of weeks? Actually, if it was $31,000-32,000, I would gladly consider doing the purchase and trade-in at different places, tax or no tax…
All dealers in my area (SE Wisconsin) started charging full MSRP starting in mid-to-late fall. Most are still charging MSRP right now with no discounts- and Honda isn't offering a loyalty or conquest rebate either right now. Low(ish) interest rates yes... but nothing off of MSRP. A few in my area are charging more than MSRP right now. None are selling for below MSRP.

Before this whole supply-crunch thing- it was possible to get a 2.0t Sport for under $30,000 and a 2.0t Touring for $34,000 or less- but you're not going to get anything close to that discount right now. MSRP or above until supply catches up with demand.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All dealers in my area (SE Wisconsin) started charging full MSRP starting in mid-to-late fall. Most are still charging MSRP right now with no discounts- and Honda isn't offering a loyalty or conquest rebate either right now. Low(ish) interest rates yes... but nothing off of MSRP. A few in my area are charging more than MSRP right now. None are selling for below MSRP.

Before this whole supply-crunch thing- it was possible to get a 2.0t Sport for under $30,000 and a 2.0t Touring for $34,000 or less- but you're not going to get anything close to that discount right now. MSRP or above until supply catches up with demand.
In my area, anything close to MSRP is something that MAY only apply to the more “mainstream” trims (in the case of Honda Accord - 1.5T), otherwise it’s usually over MSRP…

I could, of course, sell my car now (for the high price I’ve been offered) and then wait for the chip shortage to end, but what if prices don’t go down considering the current inflation? : )
 

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I'm on my 4th Accord; 2006 SE coupe > 2016 Sport 6MT > 2019 Sport 1.5T > 2022 Sport 2.0T.

I loved my 2016 for it's simplicity and infatuation with the 2.4, but the 10th gen is such a huge leap in refinement and material quality, it feels like last gen Audi with the ergos and touch points.
The way you feel inside a car is completely subjective of course, but this car fits me so well that I bought it twice, same color, just went to the 2.0T this time, no regrets.

The 10th gen has a different feel than previous Accords, I believe with the packaging of the new turbo motors (correct me if I am wrong) they shifted the cab forward which is why the back seats are so cavernous.

I absolutely love this gen, everything is so well laid out and not too complicated, but modern at the same time. It fits me like a glove. There has been pairs of Nikes I've bought twice because I wanted a second go after the first pair wore out, that is how I feel about this car.

When in modern times have prices come down for consumer items?, I'd wager that the 2023 model whether it's re-designed or not will have a hefty price increase. The current prices set by the manufacturer have not caught up to the current rate of inflation yet. Find one new for MSRP and enjoy it.
 

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I'm on my 4th Accord; 2006 SE coupe > 2016 Sport 6MT > 2019 Sport 1.5T > 2022 Sport 2.0T.

I loved my 2016 for it's simplicity and infatuation with the 2.4, but the 10th gen is such a huge leap in refinement and material quality, it feels like last gen Audi with the ergos and touch points.
The way you feel inside a car is completely subjective of course, but this car fits me so well that I bought it twice, same color, just went to the 2.0T this time, no regrets.

The 10th gen has a different feel than previous Accords, I believe with the packaging of the new turbo motors (correct me if I am wrong) they shifted the cab forward which is why the back seats are so cavernous.

I absolutely love this gen, everything is so well laid out and not too complicated, but modern at the same time. It fits me like a glove. There has been pairs of Nikes I've bought twice because I wanted a second go after the first pair wore out, that is how I feel about this car.

When in modern times have prices come down for consumer items?, I'd wager that the 2023 model whether it's re-designed or not will have a hefty price increase. The current prices set by the manufacturer have not caught up to the current rate of inflation yet. Find one new for MSRP and enjoy it.
This is a great summary of why the 10th Gen is such a nice package. I agree with the idea of getting a 10th Gen... I was actually pretty surprised that Honda only upped the price by $500 given the current rate of inflation. I wouldn't be surprised if the price of the Accord goes up a bit more than that once the new generation comes out...

I hope that Honda doesn't mess too much with the formula for the next generation. I'm sure that there will be updated styling, but there's so much that is just great about the current Accord that I don't feel that a major overhaul is needed. Maybe a slightly updated infotainment system with a bigger screen... but otherwise the current Accord is a very strong vehicle overall. I'm constantly surprised that the Camry outsells it. I was a loyal Camry buyer for years and years... but it seems like the 9th Gen Accord was much better than the 7th Gen Camry... and the current Accord seems much better than the current Camry in almost all respects. The only reason that I could maybe justify the Camry over the current Accord is if someone was very reluctant to get a turbo.
 

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... The only reason that I could maybe justify the Camry over the current Accord is if someone was very reluctant to get a turbo.
Almost all of the people that I know who chose to buy a Camry over an Accord did so in order to get AWD. Perhaps Honda feels an AWD Accord would compromise Acura sales, but I do think it would be a popular car.
 

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Almost all of the people that I know who chose to buy a Camry over an Accord did so in order to get AWD. Perhaps Honda feels an AWD Accord would compromise Acura sales, but I do think it would be a popular car.
I'm just not sure that AWD really offers that much of a bonus in most areas. I'm not going to lie- my wife's AWD Passport is nice to have in the snow due to its AWD system- but my Accord does fine given that I have a set of CrossClimate2 winter-friendly tires that I use in winter. I just feel that AWD has too many negatives for a midsize sedan. More weight, more parts to break, more maintenance, and lower MPG. Plus the fact that you have to pay an extra $1000-$1500 to get AWD on a Camry depending on trim level.

Maybe about 15-20% of the Camrys shipped to the dealerships near me have been AWD lately.. not that there are many to speak of. I'm not sure if people are buying them because they are available... or if they are truly interested in AWD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I must be in the minority, but the only reason I would consider a Camry is the still-available V6; I don’t really care if it’s AWD, since I live in a snow-free (well, in my area at least) state. I don’t know what they did with the current-generation Camry (I haven’t driven one yet), but the previous one felt rather disturbing. As I mentioned before, the rental Camrys I drove felt like they were not willing to stay on course at highway speeds and required constant mini-corrections. I found it hard to believe so many folks liked that sort of driving experience… And the Camry generation before the last one had what appeared to be a fairly anemic four-cylinder engine/transmission combination.

Not to mention the fact that, as a passenger, I almost got killed in the previous Camry when we got rear-ended (the whole car literally got compressed all the way up to the B pillar - forget cabin integrity, etc.).
 

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The Toyota Camry has always outsold the Accord 3:2, even though the gearhead "Car & Driver" says the Accord is a better driver's car. Some things I will never understand.
FWIW, I bought my '18 2.0 Touring with 15K miles on the clock, saved $7,000 over my best "new" price I could get. I now have 35,600 miles and not one problem ever. I've had probably 5 different generations of Accords; this one's the best so far.
 

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I must be in the minority, but the only reason I would consider a Camry is the still-available V6; I don’t really care if it’s AWD, since I live in a snow-free (well, in my area at least) state. I don’t know what they did with the current-generation Camry (I haven’t driven one yet), but the previous one felt rather disturbing. As I mentioned before, the rental Camrys I drove felt like they were not willing to stay on course at highway speeds and required constant mini-corrections. I found it hard to believe so many folks liked that sort of driving experience… And the Camry generation before the last one had what appeared to be a fairly anemic four-cylinder engine/transmission combination.

Not to mention the fact that, as a passenger, I almost got killed in the previous Camry when we got rear-ended (the whole car literally got compressed all the way up to the B pillar - forget cabin integrity, etc.).
That's true- Toyota's 3.5L V6 is one heck of an engine. I hope that Honda's 2.0t engine turns out to be as reliable and durable over the long run as the Camry's V6.
 

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I'm just not sure that AWD really offers that much of a bonus in most areas. I'm not going to lie- my wife's AWD Passport is nice to have in the snow due to its AWD system- but my Accord does fine given that I have a set of CrossClimate2 winter-friendly tires that I use in winter. I just feel that AWD has too many negatives for a midsize sedan. More weight, more parts to break, more maintenance, and lower MPG. Plus the fact that you have to pay an extra $1000-$1500 to get AWD on a Camry depending on trim level.

Maybe about 15-20% of the Camrys shipped to the dealerships near me have been AWD lately.. not that there are many to speak of. I'm not sure if people are buying them because they are available... or if they are truly interested in AWD.
AWD is overrated IMO.

My dad has a 2020 Camry and i have a 2019 Accord. Both are great cars (i don't think anyone is arguing that). He's 70. Let's just say the Camry fits him and the Accord fits me. 😁
 

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AWD is overrated IMO.

My dad has a 2020 Camry and i have a 2019 Accord. Both are great cars (i don't think anyone is arguing that). He's 70. Let's just say the Camry fits him and the Accord fits me. 😁
I was born December of 1948, and I wouldn't touch a Camry. 5.4 seconds to 60 mph in my 4 banger turbo 2.0 Touring Accord is quicker than a BMW 3 series, all the while getting better fuel mileage than the Camry!

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