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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
5.4 seconds to 60 mph in my 4 banger turbo 2.0 Touring Accord…
👍 That’s what I like to hear! : ) Actually, this is even better than what I was hoping for. Does it entail a “pedal overlap” start, or you just press the gas pedal?

That's true- Toyota's 3.5L V6 is one heck of an engine. I hope that Honda's 2.0t engine turns out to be as reliable and durable over the long run as the Camry's V6.
Me too… I was thinking about a new Camry TRD, but they are scarce and get awful dealer mark-ups these days. Also, given my so-so prior experiences with Camrys, I would have to first test drive one to see if the current generation is worth considering.
 

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👍 That’s what I like to hear! : ) Actually, this is even better than what I was hoping for. Does it entail a “pedal overlap” start, or you just press the gas pedal?
&
According to the latest issue of "Car & Driver". I'm not aware of what method they use, but I will say, as the previous owner of a BMW 3 series, the car is seriously fast!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
&
According to the latest issue of "Car & Driver". I'm not aware of what method they use, but I will say, as the previous owner of a BMW 3 series, the car is seriously fast!
The number is amazing. On a side note, if BMW was made by either Honda or Toyota, I would buy one in a jiff ;)
 

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Me too… I was thinking about a new Camry TRD, but they are scarce and get awful dealer mark-ups these days. Also, given my so-so prior experiences with Camrys, I would have to first test drive one to see if the current generation is worth considering.
The Camry TRD is a bit too juvenile for my taste. I'm not a fan of the body kit and large rear wing. I do really like the new medium blue color that they started offering this year on TRD models. If they offered the TRD with a smaller lip spoiler then it might be more appealing.

I think that the only V6 Camry that I would consider would be an XLE V6 right now. I like the XSE too- but the exhaust tips would be something that would drive me nuts. On every SE/XSE, only one tip per side is real. The other is a fake tip- right next to the real one. After just a few thousand miles, the fake tip is still bright and shiny- inside and out. Right next to it is the real tip that has blackened from the exhaust. For some reason, that bothers me and sticks out like a sore thumb on every Camry XSE and SE that I see.

The XLE V6 has a two exhaust tips- one per side- and they are both real. It's such a small thing- but it would drive me nuts if I owned one of those.

Almost all of the people that I know who chose to buy a Camry over an Accord did so in order to get AWD. Perhaps Honda feels an AWD Accord would compromise Acura sales, but I do think it would be a popular car.
I feel that maybe pricing might be another thing that drives people to the Camry. Looking at the various trim levels, it seems like the Camry is about $800-$1700 cheaper at the lower end of the spectrum.... granted Toyota uses option packages to increase those MSRPs a bit- but it's possible to get the base Camrys without the options (at least it was before the shortage got so bad).

2022 Camry LE MSRP with destination: $26,320
2022 Accord LX MSRP with destination: $27,135 (+$815)

2022 Camry SE MSRP with destination: $27,860
2022 Accord Sport MSRP with destination: $29,595 (+$1735)


Things get a bit more complex above the Accord's Sport level- mainly because the trim levels of the cars get a bit more complex... but a Camry XLE is a lot cheaper than an Accord EXL... but an Accord Special Edition isn't too far off of a Camry XSE with the base engine. At the top of the Spectrum, the Accord has a one (really two)-size fits all approach with the Touring trim. You can either spend $39,000 for the 2.0t Touring or $38,000 for the hybrid. No option packages on either- just dealer-installed accessories. The Camry offers the XSE V6, XLE V6, both are offered with two different option packages. You can also option a Camry Hybrid up to about $37,000 if you select an XLE or XSE Hybrid and go crazy with the option packages.

It seems like Toyota just offers a lot more trim levels and option packages that make it easier to find a Camry that includes the specific options that you want. Honda has always taken a different approach- they've always offered trim packages but no option packages. That makes it a bit harder to find an Accord with the option that you want- while avoiding options that you won't use and don't want to pay for.

Well- at least that was true before the supply shortage. Now there are so few choices that you get stuck with whatever is on the lot.
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
The Camry TRD is a bit too juvenile for my taste. I'm not a fan of the body kit and large rear wing. I do really like the new medium blue color that they started offering this year on TRD models. If they offered the TRD with a smaller lip spoiler then it might be more appealing.
Exactly how I feel, though my main concerns would be the interior colors (is it bright red with black? - now THAT's juvenile) plus the reduced ground clearance (I like sporty, but I don't like hitting things with the underside : )). The only reason I considered TRD was the price - it's the least expensive trim with a V6.
 

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Exactly how I feel, though my main concerns would be the interior colors (is it bright red with black? - now THAT's juvenile) plus the reduced ground clearance (I like sporty, but I don't like hitting things with the underside : )). The only reason I considered TRD was the price - it's the least expensive trim with a V6.
Toyota used to offer an SE V6 trim level that I thought was a really nice spot in the lineup. It would be comparable to the Accord's 2.0t Sport trim level. It's too bad that they got rid of it.

I think that the TRD's red interior (it's available on the XSE too in certain combinations)... is a questionable choice... and in addition to looking a bit too racy IMO, I'd worry about how that bright red interior would be impacted by the sun after a few years. If those bright red seats fade even a bit, it's going to look like you have an interior that might get a bit too pinkish for my liking.
 

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The number is amazing. On a side note, if BMW was made by either Honda or Toyota, I would buy one in a jiff ;)
Most of the time, the cars I see disabled on the highway in Atlanta are all the hi-tech German imports. I traded my '16 328 for the Accord Touring and I've never been disappointed. I've had 4-5 previous Accords over the decades and they've all been bulletproof.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I know there are many other threads out there on the subject; however, I don't have much time, so I'll have to ask you guys... Anyway, so I now have this 2.0T Sport out for a 24 hour test drive. First of all - I seriously like the car. No, to be precise, that's love at first sight! 😍 The acceleration is delightful. However, it is, in fact, a first-year 2018 Accord (with less than 12 k miles on it!), and it does do one of the problematic things I've read about online: namely, it keeps activating TPMS warnings (for no reason at all - all four tires are actually a bit overinflated). I know how to reset it, but the warning just comes back on after a while. How can I get rid of the thing permanently? Would greatly appreciate any tips.
 

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I know there are many other threads out there on the subject; however, I don't have much time, so I'll have to ask you guys... Anyway, so I now have this 2.0T Sport out for a 24 hour test drive. First of all - I seriously like the car. No, to be precise, that's love at first sight! 😍 The acceleration is delightful. However, it is, in fact, a first-year 2018 Accord (with less than 12 k miles on it!), and it does do one of the problematic things I've read about online: namely, it keeps activating TPMS warnings (for no reason at all - all four tires are actually a bit overinflated). I know how to reset it, but the warning just comes back on after a while. How can I get rid of the thing permanently? Would greatly appreciate any tips.
Have you already done the TPMS calibration process? I’m not sure what you mean by reset? If you haven’t it would be wise to set the tire pressure to the recommended pressure from driver door jamb then do the TPMS calibration (found in the menu on the infotainment screen). That takes 30 minutes or so of driving between 30 and 50 mph.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Have you already done the TPMS calibration process? I’m not sure what you mean by reset? If you haven’t it would be wise to set the tire pressure to the recommended pressure from driver door jamb then do the TPMS calibration (found in the menu on the infotainment screen). That takes 30 minutes or so of driving between 30 and 50 mph.
I appreciate the advice. Yes, by reset I meant calibration. Actually, it gets the warning light to disappear pretty much immediately. So far it hasn't come back on after the second calibration, but I will make sure all tires are at 32 psi as specified (they must have been overinflated by the dealership).

Getting back to the positives, I find it hard to believe it's just over 250 hp and there aren't another 100 hp hiding there somewhere ☺
 

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Getting back to the positives, I find it hard to believe it's just over 250 hp and there aren't another 100 hp hiding there somewhere ☺
Honda Accord has won 36 "Best 10" awards from Car & Driver over the years. Couple years back, I read that the 10th. generation was the car for disaffected 3 Series owners. I decided the first time I had to pay for a tuneup on my 328 I would become "disaffected." That was when I found an '18 with 15K miles and bought it. The turbo is really imperceptible, just as on my 3 series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Honda Accord has won 36 "Best 10" awards from Car & Driver over the years. Couple years back, I read that the 10th. generation was the car for disaffected 3 Series owners. I decided the first time I had to pay for a tuneup on my 328 I would become "disaffected." That was when I found an '18 with 15K miles and bought it. The turbo is really imperceptible, just as on my 3 series.
Yes, I thought that was pretty amazing. It responds almost instantaneously when you press on the gas pedal a little more and just keeps going. I just gave my wife a ride; we took it to the highway, and she compared the acceleration with that of my friend’s Tesla Model 3 (leaving aside reliability statistics, that car is wonderful to drive - it does 0-60 in around 4 seconds and has extremely refined handling). The Accord is slower by the numbers, but I tend to agree - it somehow does feel very similar. Interesting coincidence that it’s also a 2018 like yours with very low miles.

And all of this comes from a person (me) who was really prejudiced against I4s (not anymore :))
 

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I appreciate the advice. Yes, by reset I meant calibration. Actually, it gets the warning light to disappear pretty much immediately. So far it hasn't come back on after the second calibration, but I will make sure all tires are at 32 psi as specified (they must have been overinflated by the dealership).
I did a bit of digging in the Wheels/Tires/Suspension sub-forum and someone suggested that it takes a bit for the calibration process to happen- it isn't immediate. Apparently you have to drive around a bit for it to calibrate. I dug up the manual and it said this:
Font Number


It says to set the pressure to the amount on the doorframe when the tires are cold. Ensure that they are all set to the correct amount, then calibrate the system and drive for 30 minutes at speeds between 30-60 MPH. If you aren't driving at those speeds or for 30 minutes after calibration, then maybe that's why it's not working.

Do a quick search for "TPMS" in the wheel/tire/suspension forum... you'll find more info there...
 

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Yes, I thought that was pretty amazing. It responds almost instantaneously when you press on the gas pedal a little more and just keeps going. I just gave my wife a ride; we took it to the highway, and she compared the acceleration with that of my friend’s Tesla Model 3 (leaving aside reliability statistics, that car is wonderful to drive - it does 0-60 in around 4 seconds and has extremely refined handling). The Accord is slower by the numbers, but I tend to agree - it somehow does feel very similar. Interesting coincidence that it’s also a 2018 like yours with very low miles.
Also note the 2018 was the first year of the 10th. generation. As I said previously, it's a wonderful car, and I've had no problems whatsoever. I also enjoyed the 328, but came to the conclusion the Accord was much more suitable for the kind of driving I do. The BMW is a wonderful car, but there's no place to enjoy "The Ultimate Driving Machine" without risking jail.
The Accord is just as fast, and burns regular gas while getting better mileage!
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I did a bit of digging in the Wheels/Tires/Suspension sub-forum and someone suggested that it takes a bit for the calibration process to happen- it isn't immediate. Apparently you have to drive around a bit for it to calibrate. I dug up the manual and it said this:
View attachment 537211

It says to set the pressure to the amount on the doorframe when the tires are cold. Ensure that they are all set to the correct amount, then calibrate the system and drive for 30 minutes at speeds between 30-60 MPH. If you aren't driving at those speeds or for 30 minutes after calibration, then maybe that's why it's not working.

Do a quick search for "TPMS" in the wheel/tire/suspension forum... you'll find more info there...
Thank you very much - I'm so tired after running around with the car all day that I'm not too good at doing research right now (first went to pick it up and waited for the paperwork, then drove to a shop that was too busy to do the prepurchase inspection, then drove to a Honda dealership that wasn't but took hours to do it, etc.). I will follow these steps tomorrow if the indicator comes on again.

Also note the 2018 was the first year of the 10th. generation. As I said previously, it's a wonderful car, and I've had no problems whatsoever. I also enjoyed the 328, but came to the conclusion the Accord was much more suitable for the kind of driving I do. The BMW is a wonderful car, but there's no place to enjoy "The Ultimate Driving Machine" without risking jail.
The Accord is just as fast, and burns regular gas while getting better mileage!
A 3-series used to be my dream (I even started shopping for a slightly used i335). However, the reliability data available online seemed a bit too intimidating. If I were a car mechanic - maybe...
 

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A 3-series used to be my dream (I even started shopping for a slightly used i335). However, the reliability data available online seemed a bit too intimidating. If I were a car mechanic - maybe...
I had wanted a BMW since I started following them in my early twenties. When I started on my career, I thought I would eventually get a new one, but every time I got a $10 raise, the cost of the car went up $15. Consequently, I drove a long succession of Accords over most of my life.
Finally when I got financially secure enough, I found a '16 3 series with about 15K miles on it, at a price I was willing to pay. (I quite literally don't remember the last time I bought a brand new car, but it was probably 1999. I made a conscious decision to buy one or two years old so I could change cars more often!)
I finally got the BMW fascination out of my system when I read the C&D article about the 10th. generation. I am NOT saying I would never go back to a 3 series, but it's much more likely I'll jump on the 11th. generation, whenever it gets released.
All that said....the market is in turmoil (to say the least!) because of the chip shortage. But if I can get a decent deal (supply and demand always in action!), I may very well buy my first new car in 20 years. Likely it will be the last new car I will ever buy, and so I plan to take excellent care for it.
BTW, for the "car lover", I recommend buying "pre-loved" with remaining factory warranty. Over the years (I just turned 73 years old...), I've saved a great deal of money this way, and had the opportunity to own really fine cars for a reasonable financial commitment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I had wanted a BMW since I started following them in my early twenties. When I started on my career, I thought I would eventually get a new one, but every time I got a $10 raise, the cost of the car went up $15. Consequently, I drove a long succession of Accords over most of my life.
Finally when I got financially secure enough, I found a '16 3 series with about 15K miles on it, at a price I was willing to pay. (I quite literally don't remember the last time I bought a brand new car, but it was probably 1999. I made a conscious decision to buy one or two years old so I could change cars more often!)
I finally got the BMW fascination out of my system when I read the C&D article about the 10th. generation. I am NOT saying I would never go back to a 3 series, but it's much more likely I'll jump on the 11th. generation, whenever it gets released.
All that said....the market is in turmoil (to say the least!) because of the chip shortage. But if I can get a decent deal (supply and demand always in action!), I may very well buy my first new car in 20 years. Likely it will be the last new car I will ever buy, and so I plan to take excellent care for it.
BTW, for the "car lover", I recommend buying "pre-loved" with remaining factory warranty. Over the years (I just turned 73 years old...), I've saved a great deal of money this way, and had the opportunity to own really fine cars for a reasonable financial commitment.
With me it’s the other way around - I always preferred new cars and drove my previous Accord for twelve years all the way until it started to fall apart. I would buy a new car now as well if it wasn’t for this crazy market. I simply can’t trust the previous owner to do everything “perfectly,” like not redlining the engine all the time, not hitting curbs, not getting into accidents that are not reported on Carfax, etc. : )
 

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With me it’s the other way around - I always preferred new cars and drove my previous Accord for twelve years all the way until it started to fall apart. I would buy a new car now as well if it wasn’t for this crazy market. I simply can’t trust the previous owner to do everything “perfectly,” like not redlining the engine all the time, not hitting curbs, not getting into accidents that are not reported on Carfax, etc. : )
I've always taken excellent care of my cars so that, if necessary, I felt I could drive them forever. Of course Covid and the chip shortage has distorted the market, so I can't look too far into the future.
The 11th. generation should debut in Fall of '22,
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I've always taken excellent care of my cars so that, if necessary, I felt I could drive them forever. Of course Covid and the chip shortage has distorted the market, so I can't look too far into the future.
The 11th. generation should debut in Fall of '22,
I'm really curious about the next generation, though I've read an article somewhere predicting that engines would stay unchanged. Now I think that would actually be a good thing: "don't fix it if it ain't broke." :)
 

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I'm really curious about the next generation, though I've read an article somewhere predicting that engines would stay unchanged. Now I think that would actually be a good thing: "don't fix it if it ain't broke." :)
Yes, the car surely doesn't need more power. In fact, it's too easy to spin the front wheels, so if anything, I'd expect fine-tuning of the suspension so as to get the power down more effectively. Japanese engineers are extremely talented so I wouldn't be surprised if they managed to get slightly better mileage out of the same engine. For sure they're not going back to a V6 as they gave that up a couple years back.
In fact, and now that I think about it, my 2000 Accord (gold with beige leather!) had a V6, but my '18 is faster, and every bit as smooth. Honda is justly famous for their engines, so I think it's reasonable to expect some improvement, along with the expected MSRP bump.
 
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