Drive Accord Honda Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2014 Sport CVT (3,300 miles)has been averaging an unimpressive 29mpg with a 75/25 city/highway mix with the Eco button on. "Hyper milling" attempts have yielded 33 at best. I played with tire pressure from 34 up to 36 and 38psi to see if that made a difference but no change.

A few days ago I had a new set of michelin x ice 3 mounted to a takeoff set of 2014 17" ex-l wheels. First tank was 34 mpg without trying. And with snow today the michelins are incredible - I took the honda to work in the snow instead of my jeep with all seasons,

Factory Goodyear 235/45/18 have the same diameter as the replacement 215/55/17.

Is it the tires? Lighter weight wheels?
 

·
↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → B A
Joined
·
9,989 Posts
It's likely the lighter wheels and narrower tires.

18x8 Sport wheels weigh ~28 lbs and Goodyear Eagle LS-2 tires in 235/45-18 weigh 25 lbs.

17x7.5 EX wheels weigh ~25 lbs and Michelin X-Ice Xi3 tires in 215/55-17 weigh 24 lbs.
 

·
Even My Mower Is a Honda!
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
My 2014 Sport CVT (3,300 miles)has been averaging an unimpressive 29mpg with a 75/25 city/highway mix with the Eco button on. "Hyper milling" attempts have yielded 33 at best. I played with tire pressure from 34 up to 36 and 38psi to see if that made a difference but no change.

A few days ago I had a new set of michelin x ice 3 mounted to a takeoff set of 2014 17" ex-l wheels. First tank was 34 mpg without trying. And with snow today the michelins are incredible - I took the honda to work in the snow instead of my jeep with all seasons,

Factory Goodyear 235/45/18 have the same diameter as the replacement 215/55/17.

Is it the tires? Lighter weight wheels?
Lighter rims, a lot less rotational mass.

Never once have I even bothered to check what kind of gas mileage any of my cars ran. Fill up and go...if you're really so worried about it that you must change tires, try new tricks, perhaps giving up your car for a bus is a better route to go. & I'm not trying to be prick on your thread, just my view on it.
What does it look like when you are trying?


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Uncle Luc- I drive 600+ miles a week and bought a car that claims to get 34mpg highway. Regardless of financial means it is a matter of principal and root cause that I am going after and not the $ or cents. Also this is my winter setup, the 18's will go back on in the spring so I'm not sure where you read that I got the tires for gas savings - that just worked out.

My '03 Saab got 32 mpg without trying and was more fun to drive.

My '06 Viper got 8 mpg on fun trips and 14 when going easy. Yes I still keep track because I'm a #s guy and not everything is about $.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I weighed one of my stock wheel/tires at 54# and my snows are 45#. That's a huge difference in rotating mass, plus narrower tires. I gained a couple mpg with the winter wheels before the temps got consistently cold enough to negatively affect mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
I weighed both the 18" Sport wheels and my stock 17" wheels when I swapped them out before winter.

17's with stock Michelins: 48 lbs



18's with stock Michelins: 53 lbs

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Narrower tire = less contact patch = less rolling resistance = better MPG :)
 

·
been around the block
Joined
·
823 Posts
Uncle Luc- I drive 600+ miles a week and bought a car that claims to get 34mpg highway. Regardless of financial means it is a matter of principal and root cause that I am going after and not the $ or cents. Also this is my winter setup, the 18's will go back on in the spring so I'm not sure where you read that I got the tires for gas savings - that just worked out.

My '03 Saab got 32 mpg without trying and was more fun to drive.

My '06 Viper got 8 mpg on fun trips and 14 when going easy. Yes I still keep track because I'm a #s guy and not everything is about $.
But as we all know gas mileage claims by manufacturers don't always stand when it comes to the real world. Since the miles you put on monthly are high, wouldn't a hybrid or diesel been better for you ?
 

·
Even My Mower Is a Honda!
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
My 2014 Sport CVT (3,300 miles)has been averaging an unimpressive 29mpg with a 75/25 city/highway mix with the Eco button on. "Hyper milling" attempts have yielded 33 at best. I played with tire pressure from 34 up to 36 and 38psi to see if that made a difference but no change.

A few days ago I had a new set of michelin x ice 3 mounted to a takeoff set of 2014 17" ex-l wheels. First tank was 34 mpg without trying. And with snow today the michelins are incredible - I took the honda to work in the snow instead of my jeep with all seasons,

Factory Goodyear 235/45/18 have the same diameter as the replacement 215/55/17.

Is it the tires? Lighter weight wheels?
When did you buy the car? I ask because once the cold weather hit I went from averaging 31-32mpg on a tank to 27. Seeing you have a 2014 I think that most of your driving has been cold weather so 29 is not so bad.

Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,699 Posts
My MPG has dropped with much bigger snow tires from my 04 MDX.

One thing not mentioned, if in snow, one tends to drive slower (I hope) which aids MPG but a huge factor is a much higher rolling resistance with sticky grippy snow tires-that is what is needed for traction but hurts MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Snow tires are made from a softer rubber compound, but with lower temperatures, the stiffness is more like an all-season tire in warmer temperatures. Anything lower than 7 degrees c (45 degrees f) the rubber on an all-season tire becomes too stiff and some traction is lost even on dry roads.

If I were to guess, I'd say it's a combination of less spinning mass and the grippier winter tires spinning less on snowy roads that increases fuel economy during the winter driving season.
 

·
Former H Master Tech
Joined
·
318 Posts
4lbs per wheel/tire is quite a bit of loss in rotating mass. That along with a less sticky tire compound and narrower tire would likely net a few extra MPGs. But the good looks of the sport wheels are totally worth the extra dollar or two i may lose at the pump ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
Never once have I even bothered to check what kind of gas mileage any of my cars ran. Fill up and go...if you're really so worried about it that you must change tires, try new tricks, perhaps giving up your car for a bus is a better route to go. & I'm not trying to be prick on your thread, just my view on it.

I agree, when I go to the airport, I have never bothered to check if my flights are on time, I just show up and wait. Perhaps walking would be better. Cheaper, no?

Checking the mileage and being aware of fuel economy is a natural part of owning a car for some people. Myself included. To not check it would be like ordering something at a restaurant but not looking to make sure the order is correct before taking a bite. Or not bothering to pay attention the bill when it comes time to pay.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
Narrower tire = less contact patch = less rolling resistance = better MPG :)
Actually, no.

I got into a heated (for this forum) discussion and modified my view on this. For all practical purposes, the contact patch is independent of tire size, all other things being equal. The contact patch is determined by the equalization of downforces and pressure. A lower profile and higher profile tire will have the same contact patch area, but the lower profile patch will be wider and shorter, meaning increased rolling resistance. The patch areas, however, are equal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
The Michlein X3 is a low rolling resistance tire

The Michlein X3 is a low rolling resistance tire, like the GY Fuel Max tires some of us have, this likely contributes to the better mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,682 Posts
Snow tires are made from a softer rubber compound, but with lower temperatures, the stiffness is more like an all-season tire in warmer temperatures. Anything lower than 7 degrees c (45 degrees f) the rubber on an all-season tire becomes too stiff and some traction is lost even on dry roads.

If I were to guess, I'd say it's a combination of less spinning mass and the grippier winter tires spinning less on snowy roads that increases fuel economy during the winter driving season.
BINGO! A+. Combination of superior tire compound and less weight spinning closer to the axis equals better mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
The Michlein X3 is a low rolling resistance tire, like the GY Fuel Max tires some of us have, this likely contributes to the better mpg.
Yes - it was tested to have extremely low rolling resistance by Consumer Reports. Also got top scores for snow and ice traction. Just ordered 4 myself - for my '07. Which will now see more winter duty.

'13 actually does pretty well in the snow with the GY fuelmax. Not nearly as good as snow tires though. It will get more rest this winter when the roads are bad.

When I get snows for the '13 next year I will most likely minus size to a 205/65R16. Will improve mileage further still, and will be better at cutting through snow. Also like to have taller sidewalls when driving through deep ice ruts.

\BTW. I have primacy as my summer tires on the '07 and with just over half of their tread left they are terrible in the snow. Much much worse than the GY fuelmax (which still look almost new at 11,000 miles). Please be careful if you drive on these in the snow once they start to wear - most of the sipes just disappear and the tires become almost like slicks.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top