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I own a 2001 Accord EX in California and I am having problems with something that causes the TCS light and the CEL light to come on. This problem happens at 55ish+ MPH which leads me to believe it has something to do with the EGR "ready" test since it seems to be the only one based on higher speeds.

There are more obvious problems such as a Transmission that is starting to go bad. At higher speeds the car starts to shake slightly which I assume is related to the TCS light. I need to wait till taxes to get the Trany fixed but my smog is due soon.

My first attempt made in ignorance was to disconnect the battery to reset the light and then take it to the smog shop (duh). I have now found the info on how to set all 5 tests to "ready" thanks to this great forum of helpful people (cheers!!).

My question is... If I manage to "ready" the other 4 checks and the EGR shows "not ready" will the car pass if everything else checks out? I read both that all checks should be "ready" and I also read that 4 of 5 should be "ready" on a 2001 car?

Thanks for your time!!
 

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The quickest way to check if the readiness codes are set, turn the ignition switch to the ON (II) position, without starting the engine. The MIL will come on for 20 seconds. If it then goes off, the readiness monitors are set. If it blinks five times, the readiness monitors are not set.

Here is the EPA's definition of the readiness tests:
The OBD system monitors the status of up to 11 emission control related subsystems by performing either continuous or periodic functional tests of specific components and vehicle conditions. The first three testing categories – misfire, fuel trim, and comprehensive components – are continuous, while the remaining eight only run after a certain set of conditions has been met. The algorithms for running these eight, periodic monitors are unique to each manufacturer and involve such things as ambient temperature as well as driving conditions. Most vehicles will have at least five of the eight remaining monitors (catalyst, evaporative system, oxygen sensor, heated oxygen sensor, and exhaust gas recirculation or EGR
system) while the remaining three (air conditioning, secondary air, and heated catalyst) are not necessarily applicable to all vehicles.


The readiness test completed just mean you have completed the Drive cycle, the drive cycle is a series of different speeds and conditions that must be completed in order for the Readiness tests to complete. If the tests complete and there is a failure you have code set and MIL light on, then you need to read the code and use that code to help determine the issue with the emissions system and preform the repairs. Then reset the Code and go through the Drive cycle again until all readiness tests have completed without errors if you have code set and MIL light on again, you continue repairing the car.

The drive cycle is usually completed with normally driving for 1 to 2 days, any code scanner can tell you if all the readiness tests have been completed also.
 

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My first attempt made in ignorance was to disconnect the battery to reset the light and then take it to the smog shop (duh). I have now found the info on how to set all 5 tests to "ready" thanks to this great forum of helpful people (cheers!!).

My question is... If I manage to "ready" the other 4 checks and the EGR shows "not ready" will the car pass if everything else checks out? I read both that all checks should be "ready" and I also read that 4 of 5 should be "ready" on a 2001 car?

Thanks for your time!!
Each state and local smog authority can have different rules on "readiness" codes. It can also depend on the age of the vehicle. Since Im not in California I cant answer your question, but your local smog shop should be able to tell you what your local rules are.
 
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