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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I was looking to buy rims for my 2009 Honda accord Sedan but im not sure what rims to get so I wanted to get your opinions to help me with my decision. I was thinking of putting black and chrome 20"s since my car black but I was told those are not good for cars because since they are so heavy they mess the trasnmission, suspension, etc. Is this true? If not I was thinking of getting these 19" alloy rims painting them black and dropping my car. what do you guys think?
 

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It's not the chrome. Many larger diameter cast wheels are very heavy. Yes, in a way, they are "bad" for the car. Added weight increases wear, increases stopping distances, decreases acceleration, and decreases fuel economy. All things that can mess with your driving pleasure at the least.

Some people will put up with anything - just to have the latest look.

Overall weight is a big factor in choosing a tire and wheel combination. I would try to stick with something that weighs the same or less than a stock setup.
 

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Captain Slow
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looks curb rashed to hell
 

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There are some 18s and 19s out there that aren't too heavy if you look around!
 

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What's a weight that will be more harmful to your car? Like above the stock rim weight.
 

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HA! I'll keep that in mind.
 

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Chrome adds about 1.5 lbs to each wheel.

Those 19" wheels plus 19" tires are going to add alot more weight.
 

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Adding more weight to the suspension usually isn't the safest or best idea. However, super light wheels tend to crack very easily if the roads you drive on aren't pristine. Also, increasing the rolling diameter of the wheel will affect speedometer, abs, and traction control systems on your car but you may be able to input the new diameter into the pcm with a factory scan tool. Or, you can "plus-one" with your wheels by decreasing your tire sidewall to compensate for an increase in rim size but this will also yield a harsher ride quality as the sidewall also acts as a shock absorber to an extent. The plus one formula is this:

[tire width x the sidewall (as a decimal) x 2 (because the sidewall is on both ends of the diameter of the wheel)] divided by 25.4 (metric conversion factor) + the diameter of the rim.

For example, a stock front wheel size might be 215/60/16 which is read as tire width/sidewall width/rim diameter.

215 x .60 x 2 = 258mm / 25.4 = 10.157" + 16" = 26.157"

You would want to keep your new wheel and tire combination within an inch of this size to avoid abs, transmission/differential, traction control, and speedometer problems.

And here's some great information on adding unsprung weight to your car:


Unsprung Weight

This is one of the most critical factors affecting a vehicle's road holding ability. Unsprung weight is that portion of a vehicle that is not supported by the suspension (i.e. wheels, tires and brakes) and therefore is the most susceptible to road shock and cornering forces. By reducing unsprung weight, alloy wheels provide more precise steering input and improved "turning in" characteristics. So what. SO WHAT!? This is a key concept that many people overlook. We have been telling you for a long time now to get light weight wheels and tires. Here's how it all comes together.

Every time you hit a bump, the wheel assembly is accelerated upwards, decelerates to a stop, then accelerates downward till it reaches equilibrium. If the wheel can’t accelerate fast enough, shock is transmitted to the body, which may upset the balance of the car. As an example think of small, sharp edged speed bumps versus those gigantic, but wide, monsters in some lots. The sharp edged ones are much more annoying to traverse, aren’t they? That’s because they require the suspension to accelerate more rapidly. Now imagine going over some stutter bumps in a corner. You’ll have a very rapid series of accelerations and decelerations. If the wheel is lighter, it will accelerate upwards and downwards faster (a=F/m). This means it will follow the road better and, even more importantly, it will allow the suspension to work better. The shock and spring will have to control less unsprung weight/mass, which means they can stop and start the motion of the assembly easier and at a rapid pace.

Why Reduce Unspring Wieght?

Reducing unsprung weight minimizes the load placed on controlling the motion of the wheels and tires. This means that suspension springs and shock absorbers will have a greater reserve capacity to control body motion -- just as they were intended to! The result is better handling.

http://hondaswap.com/general-tech-articles/unsprung-weight-part-1-a-29057/


Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So i took my car to a Rim shop to ask them, I told them i wanted to put 20's and the guy said it would affect my ride quality, stopping distance and more stress on the transmission so I don't wanna do that since i only had my car for a year and I want it to run as good as possible. I wanted to put 19" Oem alloy wheels 10 spoke instead but they seem to be out of stock @ the warehouse =/. Does any one have recommendations on 19"-20" rims that won't affect my car in a bad way?
 

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Not only is chrome bad for your car... Its bad for my eyes! Idk I mean to each his own, just never liked chrome. I don't even like the chrome strip around the windows.
 
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