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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased my 2013 accord coupe and was pretty disappointed with the condition of the exterior. Upon leaving the dealership there were several scratches, swirls, and dirty windows. Having no previous car cleaning experience or products I set out to learn some techniques and put together a kit of products I could use for years to come. People on this forum seem to swear by blackfire and sonax products and they seem to work great; however, I decided to buy all my products from a local store because of some special pricing I can get from them. I used the following products and having rated them on a scale of 1-10.

1. Meguiar's gold class car wash: This is the best car was soap I have ever used. The suds are thick and luxurious, not to mention it does a great job of getting off the dirt and grime. 9/10

2. Meguiar's professional show car glaze #7: This polish is applied after your clay bar and before your wax/seal. The purpose is to give your paint a mirror type shine. I applied it to the hood and I definitely believe it gave the paint some more depth. I only applied thin coat but people who reviewed the product online say a few coats is optimal. 9/10

3. Meguiar's professional hi-tech yellow wax #16: The store I bought my supplies from didn't sell any synthetic polymer sealants so my choices were limited here. I chose this wax because I thought it would complement the sealant. This seems to be a high quality carnuba wax, it was easy to apply and take off. The reviews on amazon seem to agree with my observations. 9/10

4. Mothers California gold clay bar kit (includes clay bar, showtime detailer spray, and microfiber cloth) This was my first time using a clay bar so I don't have anything to compare it to, but overall it was a simple process. Apply the showtime spray, clay bar, and wipe off. I used the clay bar on the body as well as the windows. I don't really know what to think of the clay bar because I didn't see any dirty contaminants on it after I used it. That's probably because the car is new..the surface did feel very smooth after I used it. A good product, a little pricey. 8/10

5. Stoner's Invisible Glass: This is by far the best glass cleaner I have ever used. No streaks, no spots and it leaves the window looking clear as day. Fantastic product. 10/10.

6. Meguiar's hot shine tire coating: I followed the directions on the back of this product but I'm still not sure If I used it correctly because I was extremely disappointed with the results. I sprayed it on, let it sit for a few minutes and wiped it off. I wiped it off with a paper towel and the paper towel turned really black and dirty from the tires. I'm not sure if I wiped off rubber or dirt. The tire did look clean; however, it wasn't shiny or "wet" at all. Not to mention it made my clean wheels dirty because it rolled off from the tire onto the wheel. 5/10

7. Lexol leather conditioner: I was on the fence about using this product because I know we don't have genuine leather seats but I tried it anyway. It probably did make the seats a little softer but overall I don't really have any great feedback, I may use it in my other cars or furniture to see how it does. Rating TBD

8. 303 Aerospace protectant: I applied this products because everyone on this forum seems to swear by it. It did a nice job of giving the plastics and vinyl a shine and protection. My only complaint is that it left streaks and marks on some parts of the plastics, that's most likely user error though. I just have to figure out how to get rid of those marks. I will continue to condition the interior plastics with this product. 8/10.

9. Rain-X: I've previously used this product and it works great, I definitely feel safer driving in the rain after applying rain x. 10/10

Overall the car looked great after I washed and detailed it. This was my first serious attempt at washing and waxing and it was a positive experience. I took some pictures of the car a few days after I washed/waxed it...I think the hood really pops. My future goal is to get proficient with a dual action orbital. Lemme know what you think of these products, and feel free to ask any questions!





 

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I don't know if the hot shine has silicone, but if it does, I would avoid it. I clean my tires "off-the-car" twice a year with Tuf Shine cleaner and the Tuf Shine brush. I had used Meguiars and Armor All foam tire cleaner/shine in the past and the first time I used the Tuf Shine it took about 5 applications to get to the white suds. I am currently using Blackfire Total Eclipse Tire Gel which is water based and versatile. One coat is a satin sheen while 2 coats will give you a more glossy look. Don't mind the price as you don't have to use very much. You can also get free 2oz. samples with larger orders on AG and Autopia and refill the bottle.
 

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I mostly use the Black Fire products now but I do have some experience with a few of the products you chose. The Meguiar's Gold Class was is a solid choice and I still use it now. The Mother's Showtime Detailer Spray works really well in between washes to remove dust, fingerprints, and other unwanted substances. I still use it along with the Black Fire Detailer Spray. In my opinion the Mother's produces a wetter, glossier shine. The Mequiar's High Tech Yellow Wax and the Show Car Glaze are both good products and I used them on my last vehicle, a MB E320. I suggest you add some of the Black Fire Crystal Seal to your arsenal. It works on paint, glass, plastic, and even your rims. It goes on easy, is streak free, and no need to wipe anything off. Two coats applied a few hours apart will help keep your car looking nice for weeks, if not months. Don't really like the tire shine you chose. Try the Meguiar's Endurance Gel instead. It can be found at Wal Mart and is pretty inexpensive. One coat provides a sort of dull matte shine while a second coat gives a glossier look. Lastly, the Mother's Clay Bar is also a good choice and I still use it also.
 

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Your best purchase will be quality microfibers. That's where all of the swirls are coming from, especially if the '13s have clearcoat as soft as the '08s. DIY carwashes, terry cloth towels, cleaning snow off of car with just about anything, etc.

I use Poorboy's World Slick n' Suds as a maintenance wash (remember, you're looking more for the lubrication properties than the ability to 'suds-up') and Dawn dish soap before any major detailing.

I've used glaze before, but anymore see it as a wasted step. It's cover-up, basically.

I'm a GIANT fan of Collinite #845...easy to use and it legitimately lasts for months.

Stoners is my go to for glass as well. Ditto for the clay bars, but sometimes Meguiars.

She's looking good though...keep it up.
 

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Retired from Car Biz....
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good write up but you're missing the secret sauce of detailing --> the polish......with an orbital and a fine polish like Meguire's 205, all those other products you bought to shine it up work 50% better.

It's all in the polish and prep...not the glazes, waxes or sealants....

again, just my opinion...
 

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Old Bird...sometimes wise
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Meg's #16 has been discontinued since 2006 or before. How did you come across that? it sells, if you can find it, for considerably more than 5 times as much as you paid for all products, towels, buckets, etc. I think you made a typo since you show #26 in the picture not #16.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Meg's #16 has been discontinued since 2006 or before. How did you come across that? it sells, if you can find it, for considerably more than 5 times as much as you paid for all products, towels, buckets, etc. I think you made a typo since you show #26 in the picture not #16.
Good catch, that was in fact a typo, the yellow hi-tech wax I used was #26, not 16.

good write up but you're missing the secret sauce of detailing --> the polish......with an orbital and a fine polish like Meguire's 205, all those other products you bought to shine it up work 50% better.

It's all in the polish and prep...not the glazes, waxes or sealants....

again, just my opinion...
Thanks for the tip glen, I'll be sure to look into a polish like the 205 you mentioned. Do you know what the "cut" of the polish refers to?

Your best purchase will be quality microfibers. That's where all of the swirls are coming from, especially if the '13s have clearcoat as soft as the '08s. DIY carwashes, terry cloth towels, cleaning snow off of car with just about anything, etc.

I use Poorboy's World Slick n' Suds as a maintenance wash (remember, you're looking more for the lubrication properties than the ability to 'suds-up') and Dawn dish soap before any major detailing.

I've used glaze before, but anymore see it as a wasted step. It's cover-up, basically.

I'm a GIANT fan of Collinite #845...easy to use and it legitimately lasts for months.

Stoners is my go to for glass as well. Ditto for the clay bars, but sometimes Meguiars.

She's looking good though...keep it up.
I couldn't agree with you more about the microfiber towels. I picked up a few from target and the towels were actually pretty good quality. I also picked up a pack of terry cloths from walmart for the windows and interior but the quality of those towels were absolutely garbage, I'm going to try to return them it was so bad. I'll definitely check out the collinite product.

As far as the tire product goes I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, while it did clean the tires it didn't give it the gloss I was hoping for, not to mention it made the tires dirty. Ill check out the endurance gel as I've read great things about it.

Like everyone else I'll probably end up ordering the blackfire products sooner or later, the reviews seem to be unbelievable. Another product I forgot to mention was the absorber xl, this is a synthetic chamois and it's an awesome product, I would definitely recommend it.
 

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When they talk about "cut" it refers to how abrasive the polish/compound is. A heavy cut would indeed be a compound aimed at reducing severe imperfections but it leaves some marring of its own. That is generally followed by a polish with a lighter cut to remove the marring left by the compound. Sometimes a 3rd even lighter cut polish is required to further refine the finish but we're talking show cars here. Three machine polishing stages for a daily driver is a bit much.

"Cut" can also be defined by the aggressiveness of the the machine pad used. One machine polish can be used to remove fairly severe marring or mirror finish a surface depending on the pad used. For instance.......Pinnacle XMT 360 is called an AIO (All In One) product and there are many available. One can use XMT 360 on some awful finishes by changing the "cut" of the pad to one more aggressive. That same AIO can amp up the shine of a brand new car by using a pad with little or no cut. Such products are pad dependent as to how they work.

SOOOOOO, you can have various "cut" in the product combined with the various "cut" of particular machine pads to produce the outcome you desire. If you seriously want to get into it read this book by one of World's authorities on detailing:

http://www.autogeek.net/art-of-detailing-paperback-book.html
 

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why would you use glaze then put carnauba on top of it. Glaze is used for covering imperfections that can not be corrected or for a temp fix till you can do a proper correction. The yellow wax is for a more of a red paint color try a white wax carnauba product I like Wolfgang Fuzion but is not cheap but will leave a super slick finish when done.
 

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With the amount of quality products on the market that are highly concentrated, I wonder if they're just as good, if not better priced than some of the things you can get locally for your pricing. They're going to be A LOT better at what they do, which means less time spent doing it....if you get what I mean.

Another thing is the versatility of products out there today. Things like UWW+, ONR, PERL, etc that can be used on countless surfaces really cuts down on time, space and costs.

Definitely agree with Glen's post. You can put all kinds of waxes, glazes, sealants, etc on the paint, but if you have defects then you need to polish. There's no point to seal the paint if you're not happy with the paint. Unless you want to pay for everything (polisher, pads, product, etc) then it might be best to get it detailed or at least polished locally and then do a good quality sealant on it (Cquartz, Opticoat 2.0, etc). Once it gets a little nicer I'm going to finally break out my GG6 and order some Opti 2.0.
 

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+2 on the polishing. If you are claying and going straight to wax, you are likely waxing over some micro-marring from the clay. It's nearly unavoidable on this Honda paint. I use Pinnacle Ultra Poly and I still get some marring here and there. Polishing cleans it right up (something like M205, Menz SF4000/4500, or BF TPnS).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
why would you use glaze then put carnauba on top of it. Glaze is used for covering imperfections that can not be corrected or for a temp fix till you can do a proper correction. The yellow wax is for a more of a red paint color try a white wax carnauba product I like Wolfgang Fuzion but is not cheap but will leave a super slick finish when done.
The autogeek and meguiars website state glaze is supposed to put on prior to applying carnuba....it's a product designed to polish the car. Also I couldn't find any information stating yellow carnuba is for more red colors. I've heard nothing but great things about the fuzion products I'll def check them out.

With the amount of quality products on the market that are highly concentrated, I wonder if they're just as good, if not better priced than some of the things you can get locally for your pricing. They're going to be A LOT better at what they do, which means less time spent doing it....if you get what I mean.

Another thing is the versatility of products out there today. Things like UWW+, ONR, PERL, etc that can be used on countless surfaces really cuts down on time, space and costs.

Definitely agree with Glen's post. You can put all kinds of waxes, glazes, sealants, etc on the paint, but if you have defects then you need to polish. There's no point to seal the paint if you're not happy with the paint. Unless you want to pay for everything (polisher, pads, product, etc) then it might be best to get it detailed or at least polished locally and then do a good quality sealant on it (Cquartz, Opticoat 2.0, etc). Once it gets a little nicer I'm going to finally break out my GG6 and order some Opti 2.0.
I agree with everything you said 100%, I need to make sure I'm happy with the cars paint prior to sealing it. Also in terms of the quality of products I'm certain there are some really great products out there...this being my first time purchasing any products I was more comfortable going to the store and seeing what I was buying.

+2 on the polishing. If you are claying and going straight to wax, you are likely waxing over some micro-marring from the clay. It's nearly unavoidable on this Honda paint. I use Pinnacle Ultra Poly and I still get some marring here and there. Polishing cleans it right up (something like M205, Menz SF4000/4500, or BF TPnS).
I'll check it out! Thanks for the input.

Respectfully, you did not investigate detailing procedures. You just went locally and "bought a lot of stuff" and preceded with "the more layers the better"......see the detailing charts and vids at autogeek.net next time.
Believe it or not I actually did some research before I went out and bought the things I bought and washed my car. The gold class car wash, clay bar, 303, lexol, rain x, stoners are all great products. I washed the car using the two bucket method, clayed it, *polished it, and waxed it. Here's where I messed up...instead of polishing it with a swirl removing/finishing polish like meg's 205 I used a really weak polish (the megs #7 glaze). Meg's #7 says it's "a pure polish" on the label so I assumed it would be appropriate to use, I now know better. Other than that mishap I think I did a pretty good job of following the guides on autogeek and autopia. And I agree there are more concentrated better quality products out there, this was my first go around at what will surly be a process of getting better at detailing my car. Thanks for your input glen e and everyone else, I've already learned so much in the past week or two on this forum.
 

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Fear The Turtle!
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Sounds like you are on your way to a great relationship with your car...You'll never stop learning and there is always a new product to keep you excited.

As far as I know, a glaze has no polishing attributes, it only "fills" the voids left by scratches to minimize their appearance.
 
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