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2013 Accord V6-6MT
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Discussion Starter #1
.....as one of the best cars for making it to 200,000 miles, along with four other Honda Models and five Toyota models. Read on....

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/s/ten-long-haul-134000832.html

Best cars for making it to 200,000 miles

Almost any car can make it to 200,000 miles if you’re willing to throw enough money at it. But that doesn’t mean that keeping it is a good idea. A less expensive and more hassle-free way to go is to simply buy a safe and reliable model in the first place, and properly maintain it for the long haul. Just follow the maintenance schedule in your owner’s manual, take care of minor problems as they arise, keep it clean, and you should be good to go.

The models listed below are all safe bets. Of the 1.1 million vehicles represented in our annual subscriber survey, these are the ten cars, SUVs, and minivans respondents most often reported as having more than 200,000 miles. As a bonus, all happen to be models that were Consumer Reports recommended when new. That means they’re not just reliable, but they scored well in our road tests.

Toyota Prius:

Base MSRP price range: $24,200 - $34,905

With seating for five, hatchback versatility, rock-solid reliability, and an amazing 44-mpg overall in our tests, there’s a lot to like about the Prius. That’s why it’s a top-scorer in our Ratings, and a perennial favorite in our owner satisfaction surveys. And those owners like to drive them, with more examples on the far side of 200K than any other model in our survey.

Toyota Camry:

Base MSRP price range: $22,970 - $31,370

Spacious, quiet, and comfortable, the Camry is one of the most reliable sedans you can buy. It may not pack a lot of excitement, but it makes a nice place to be while the miles roll up. All powertrain choices are pretty bullet proof, but the four-cylinder Camry is the one most often past 200K, combining reliability with being the biggest selling car in America.

Honda Odyssey:

Base MSRP price range: $28,975 - $44,600

If you’ve got a crowd with places to go, there’s no better bet than the Odyssey. The cavernous and versatile interior has room for up to eight passengers and a whole lot of gear, several storage cubbies, and is very child seat friendly. Comfortable on the highway, the Odyssey gets bonus points for more responsive handling than you’d expect from a minivan.

Honda Pilot:

Base MSRP price range: $29,870 - $41,620

Another family favorite, the Pilot offers a spacious interior with room for eight, and the security of all-wheel drive. Second- and third-row seats fold into the floor for more cargo room, and the powertrain is as smooth as it is reliable. A redesigned Pilot arrives soon. If its track record is any indication, the new one should be up for going the distance.

Toyota Corolla:

Base MSRP price range: $16,950 - $22,955

One of the longest-running nameplates in the business, the Corolla also makes an excellent choice for the long run. Its compact dimensions and good fuel economy make it an excellent choice for commuting, running errands, or road trips, and ironclad reliability means you won’t be seeing much of your mechanic.

Honda Accord sedan (4-cyl.):

Base MSRP price range: $22,105 - $35,055

A smooth, reliable powertrain and good fuel economy are good qualities in a car you’re going to keep for a while, and the Accord checks in with both. Add to that a relatively spacious, quiet interior and responsive handling, and it adds up to a winning formula for going the distance.

Honda CR-V:

Base MSRP price range: $23,445 - $32,895

Combiningcompact exterior dimensions with a spacious interior, all-wheel-drive, decent fuel economy and an aversion to spending time in the shop or by the side of the road, the CR-V comes close to universal appeal. Lots of our readers like them enough to really rack up the miles.

Toyota Sienna:

Base MSRP price range: $28,600 - $46,150

A traveling companion you can really rely on, the Sienna has plenty of room for families and cargo, and the ride is comfortable and composed. The engine is strong and smooth, and fuel economy is decent for its size. The Sienna is also the only minivan available with all-wheel-drive.

Toyota Highlander (V6):

Base MSRP price range: $29,665 - $50,240

Another popular choice with families,the Highlander offers a comfortable ride, quiet, roomy, and well-finished cabin, and a smooth powertrain that’s good for many miles of hassle-free driving. With virtues like that, it’s no wonder the Highlander has long been one of our top-Rated midsized SUVs. The Hybrid version gets you even further on a tank of gas.

Honda Civic (non-hybrid):

Base MSRP price range: $18,290 - $29,390

Like a good citizen, the compact Civic sedan goes about its business without complaint, rolling up the miles and staying out of trouble. A reliability champ, the Civic is also easy on gas and more fun to drive than some competitors. Stick with the basic gas four-cylinder for better reliability than the hybrid which had high incidence of hybrid battery problems with some model years.
 

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The Shadow displaced Bug Magnet
2020 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T in Modern Steel Metallic
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Honda and Toyota. The whole list. Ford, Chrysler and GM should be ashamed.
 

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2013 Accord V6-6MT
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Discussion Starter #5
Honda and Toyota. The whole list. Ford, Chrysler and GM should be ashamed.
....along with BMW, Mercedes, Audi, VW, Nissan, and others.

Toyota and Honda are number three and number 5, respectively, in the 2015 J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study (scroll to the bottom of the link for bar graph).

2015 Vehicle Dependability Study | J.D. Power

I wonder how many buyers are significantly influenced by this data? I place a lot of emphasis on dependability/reliability, and, doubtless, this is a primary reason why I have owned nothing but Hondas and Toyotas since 1980.

How much does this type of data influence your car-buying decisions?
 

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The Shadow displaced Bug Magnet
2020 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T in Modern Steel Metallic
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How much does this type of data influence your car-buying decisions?
Last car was a Pontiac Bonneville. It was gasping its last breath. At only 110,000 miles.

Might not directly influence the decision. Then again $44K for a Buick was just too much $ for something that might not last.
 

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2013 Accord V6-6MT
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Discussion Starter #7
Last car was a Pontiac Bonneville. It was gasping its last breath. At only 110,000 miles.

Might not directly influence the decision. Then again $44K for a Buick was just too much $ for something that might not last.
RE: Then again $44K for a Buick was just too much $ for something that might not last.

Did you notice that Buick is number two on the 2015 J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study?

And Buick is one of the few manufacturers to experience a declining average age of buyers. Buicks are not just for the old folks nowadays. :)
 

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I would really like to see their list of the 5 cars that are least likely to make it 200,000 miles.

My own personal list (I went with 6):

1. Mini Cooper

2. Chevrolet Equinox

3. Ford Focus

4. Buick Enclave

5. Jeep Grand Cherokee

6. Jaguar (any model)

Anyone else want to take a crack at it ? (I try and invite other opinions now - trying to get less insults :) )
 

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2013 Accord V6-6MT
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Discussion Starter #10
Sadly it's only a look at 12 months of ownership. That's hardly a 200,000+ mile endurance run.
Per the link in post no. 6, the J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study looks at 12 months of ownership for 2012 model-year cars. J.D. Power must believe that problems at this point are a good predictor of future dependability.
 

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Graycar, do you know what their data set is? I'm guessing it is CR readers who own the models and they average out the stats regardless of model year. Will be interesting to see how the survey results are when data from the 9th gen trickle in.

Lexus is in its own class by a wide margin.

Acura is nowhere on the list?
 

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The Shadow displaced Bug Magnet
2020 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T in Modern Steel Metallic
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Lexus is in its own class by a wide margin.

Acura is nowhere on the list?
lower volume model lines don't generate enough data to be "impressive", even if 99% of the line is still running at 200,000 miles. Besides 1st owners of luxury brands (and psuedo-lux brands) seldom keep their vehicles long enough to hit the big mile marks and 2nd owners might not eligible to report findings to CR.

This story:

Top 20 longest lasting vehicles dominated by trucks, SUVs - Chicago Tribune

had Ford and Chevy trucks at the top of the list.
 

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lower volume model lines don't generate enough data to be "impressive", even if 99% of the line is still running at 200,000 miles. Besides 1st owners of luxury brands (and psuedo-lux brands) seldom keep their vehicles long enough to hit the big mile marks and 2nd owners might not eligible to report findings to CR.
Actually I was referring to Lexus for the J.D. power section of Graycar's post. I believe they are on the top year after year and there are smaller outfits than them so that says something. Yeah if I was going the Lexus route, I'd just lease a new one every few years. Who would buy and hold those type of cars.


And for Hondas going 200k, there has been a major shift with the earth dreams engines and CVT's in their high volume sellers which are only 3 years or so old so if they maintain their position in the data that would be great. The 4cyl in the Accords and CRV's that debuted in the 02 CRV was definitely built to last. Toyota on the other hand has the same powertrains for a while now on cars like the Camry and Rav 4 so they shouldn't drop.
 

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Elvira - the car
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RE: Then again $44K for a Buick was just too much $ for something that might not last.

Did you notice that Buick is number two on the 2015 J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study?

And Buick is one of the few manufacturers to experience a declining average age of buyers. Buicks are not just for the old folks nowadays. :)
Are they including the Chinese population supposedly buying Buicks in ever increasing numbers? That demographic will reduce the average age to a greater number than anything seen here.
 

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We all know this..lol:wink..but my car won't make it, it has a V6...oh..no...lol
I wonder how the V6 fairs to the I4's reliability. The Ody made it to the list and it has J series V6 engine like Accord. So if reliability of V6 Accord is different than I4 Accord then I assume it's due to something other than the engine.

I own 2007 Ody Touring with 100k miles and no major problems. It rides as solid today as the day I bought it new. I also own a 2014 V6 Accord coupe with 15k miles. I'm hoping it, too, will be problem free for a couple hundred thousand miles.
 

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I wonder how the V6 fairs to the I4's reliability. The Ody made it to the list and it has J series V6 engine like Accord. So if reliability of V6 Accord is different than I4 Accord then I assume it's due to something other than the engine.

I own 2007 Ody Touring with 100k miles and no major problems. It rides as solid today as the day I bought it new. I also own a 2014 V6 Accord coupe with 15k miles. I'm hoping it, too, will be problem free for a couple hundred thousand miles.
Believe that the V6 was not recommended because of the stereo. Take CR as a piece of data but not the gospel.

http://www.driveaccord.net/forums/86-9th-generation/190602-v6-feedback-vs-consumer-reports.html
 

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Corvalis TTX
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Toyota and Honda are number three and number 5, respectively, in the 2015 J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study (scroll to the bottom of the link for bar graph).

2015 Vehicle Dependability Study | J.D. Power

I wonder how many buyers are significantly influenced by this data? I place a lot of emphasis on dependability/reliability, and, doubtless, this is a primary reason why I have owned nothing but Hondas and Toyotas since 1980.

How much does this type of data influence your car-buying decisions?
How much?

Depends on the purpose of the purchase. For a vehicle I may want to hand down to my kids after 200,000 miles I would want a vehicle with high long term predicted reliability. For a daily driver I balance fun, reliability, road manners, handling, power, steering feel, etc. and in such cases Honda is not necessarily the right vehicle for me and said reliability data would not factor highly into my buying decision.

I would really like to see their list of the 5 cars that are least likely to make it 200,000 miles.

My own personal list (I went with 6):

1. Mini Cooper

2. Chevrolet Equinox

3. Ford Focus

4. Buick Enclave

5. Jeep Grand Cherokee

6. Jaguar (any model)

Anyone else want to take a crack at it ? (I try and invite other opinions now - trying to get less insults :) )
I can't speak for the first 6 models in your list by my 1997 XJ6 is approaching 200K miles with nary an issue.
 

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Provided they've fixed the engine problems that plagued the 8th gen models (VTC actuators on I4's, and the various VCM-related issues on V6's), these motors should easily make it to 200k miles. The V6/6MT's motor should be the most reliable, since it doesn't have VCM or direct injection, only the tried and true standard VTEC that's been going strong for over two decades. The long-term reliability of Honda's DI system has still yet to be seen, but I have faith that Honda worked out all of the kinks before putting it into production.

That said, I have very little trust in Honda's automatic transmissions based on their poor track record since the 6th gen days. I doubt either automatic (yes, even the CVT, sorry Flyboy) will make it to 200k miles without needing at least one rebuild along the way. Maybe those who spend 99% of those 200k miles on the highway will make it, but under normal circumstances, hell no lol. That's why I will not keep an automatic Honda past the warranty period. The transmission becomes a liability at that point. The only Honda I could count on to get me to 200k miles reliably would be one with a manual, which I don't want.
 

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Long live the manual
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I would really like to see their list of the 5 cars that are least likely to make it 200,000 miles.

My own personal list (I went with 6):

1. Mini Cooper

2. Chevrolet Equinox

3. Ford Focus

4. Buick Enclave

5. Jeep Grand Cherokee

6. Jaguar (any model)

Anyone else want to take a crack at it ? (I try and invite other opinions now - trying to get less insults :) )
Ford models have had many problems being reported, in particular the Fiesta / Escape / Explorer models would be taxing an owners patience with problems. While I think the redesigns are an improvement Ford quality has slipped badly. The same goes for Lincoln while I like the exterior designs problems & frequent trips to the dealer are no fun. That Mini Cooper S model is a problem car but I've read the base model is much better. Mercedes CLA also belongs on this list. Range Rover has a had reliability issues with just about every model produced.

Add : Ford Fiesta / Ford Explorer / Ford Escape / Mini Cooper S / Mercedes CLA / Range Rovers / Lincoln models.

Worst offender might be the Fiesta ! Too bad because the ST model by reading reviews seemed to be a hot little car to drive. :devil
 
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