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Noobie
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

So I have been having this engine noise problem for the last few months, valve noise a ticking like sound. I got some response from you guys before and have been thinking that the problem lies in the oil change I did when I first got the vehicle.

I am sure that my accord's previous owner ran conventional oil all of it's life since he took it to Honda for all the maintenence. I change over to synthetic this past oil change and I think it may have led to the engine ticking. I read that changing over to synthetic on a higher mileage car can be bad for the engine since it cleans out most of the build up which can lead to oil leaks and engine noise.

Do you think I should go back to conventional oil?

I am hearing a whistling sound when I am driving over 2500 RPM is that the vtec or is it a possible vacuum leak?

Some info on my accord:
-2006 i4 5speed SE 187,000KM/115,000miles
-Bought it 3 months ago at 178,000KM/110,000miles
-Cabin/air filter done
-Drive belt done
-Oil change done
-Spark plugs done
 

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Wave Interference
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189 Posts
I'm not sure that switching oils would induce ticking, but I guess it could be possible.

Sounds more like you need a valve job, and a hissing sound is typically a vacuum leak - hoses could be worn, disconnected etc...have you checked your fuel trim with a scanner? Vtec will not engage at 2500RPM, so you can rule that out.
 

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1,119 Posts
I've heard mixed opinions about this, but my own rule is if the car has been on conventional all it's life, then I will continue that trend. The cleaning job synthetic does will go into your vtec solenoid, oil pump, basically everywhere.
 

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Noobie
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not sure that switching oils would induce ticking, but I guess it could be possible.

Sounds more like you need a valve job, and a hissing sound is typically a vacuum leak - hoses could be worn, disconnected etc...have you checked your fuel trim with a scanner? Vtec will not engage at 2500RPM, so you can rule that out.
When you say valve job does that mean just a valve lash adjustment? What is the best way to check for vacuum leak just go over from the block to the intake?

I thought that on the i-vtec engine it engages at around 2200 and 4500 RPM. I may be wrong on this, probably wrong I'm still new to Honda vehicles.

I've heard mixed opinions about this, but my own rule is if the car has been on conventional all it's life, then I will continue that trend. The cleaning job synthetic does will go into your vtec solenoid, oil pump, basically everywhere.
Yeah so you think it is okay for me to just change back to conventional oil?
I just changed my oil out about 4500km ago do you think I should just change it again now or wait til I really need to change my oil again?
 

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Vtec engages at 2800 RPM. It's not powerful but it's there. Then a bigger surge at 5400RPM. When my vtec solenoid had gone bad, you could actually hear it locking up at 2800 RPM and the car would go into fail safe mode with a CEL and not go past 3000 RPM.

Personally I would use conventional, but most of the detergent effect was already done.
 

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804 Posts
I doubt your use of synth oil is causing a increase in noise. If by some chance you have that much sludge that it muted "noise" then you have a ever bigger problem ahead...

did you use the correct weight of oil ? how is your oil level?
 

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I've heard mixed opinions about this, but my own rule is if the car has been on conventional all it's life, then I will continue that trend. The cleaning job synthetic does will go into your vtec solenoid, oil pump, basically everywhere.
I don't know that syn does a better job of cleaning than conventional. It's all up the additive package in either oil. AFAIK, the advantage of synthetic is temperature stability (faster cold start flow) and longer retention of viscosity. As long as there is no oil leak, one should be able to go back and forth between conventional and synthetic. If there is an oil leak, synthetic will probably leak out faster.
 

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Fear The Turtle!
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1,883 Posts
I've been led to believe what Drew has said, it has to do with the detergent package. Chances are the Honda dealer does not use OEM oil, rather they have a "deal" with Quaker State or the like (something lower end to maximize profit).

Something my grandfather told me based on his years of experience working on cars is that if you can hear the valves tapping you know everything is working. This is a little subjective but I take it to mean a little bit of tapping at idle (and I mean a little bit, nothing loud enough to create a vibration or overbearing all other noises in the engine compartment) is acceptable.

I'd keep an eye on oil level and if the noise changes, otherwise drive and enjoy.
 

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Noobie
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've been led to believe what Drew has said, it has to do with the detergent package. Chances are the Honda dealer does not use OEM oil, rather they have a "deal" with Quaker State or the like (something lower end to maximize profit).

Something my grandfather told me based on his years of experience working on cars is that if you can hear the valves tapping you know everything is working. This is a little subjective but I take it to mean a little bit of tapping at idle (and I mean a little bit, nothing loud enough to create a vibration or overbearing all other noises in the engine compartment) is acceptable.

I'd keep an eye on oil level and if the noise changes, otherwise drive and enjoy.
I know that "tappy means happy", but my accord you can hear it tapping with the hood down and even in the car if you turn off AC/fans and music. So I definitely think its something more than the honda's i4 normal ticking.

I think I am going to bring it in this weekend for a valve adjustment and go from there.

I doubt your use of synth oil is causing a increase in noise. If by some chance you have that much sludge that it muted "noise" then you have a ever bigger problem ahead...

did you use the correct weight of oil ? how is your oil level?
Check oil level yesterday it was right in the middle between the dots. I used 5w-20 synthetic which I believe is correct.
 

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White on Black AV6-6
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100 Posts
I have the 3.0 V6 and I know you are asking about your 4-banger but FYI:

I run Schaeffers Supreme 9000 full synthetic 5w-40 HD Diesel engine oil
- not even a hint that the engine doesn't LOVE it.
- no worries here

I run HD TRACTOR hydraulic fluid in my power steering
- makes a funny sound when it's below freezing
- runs just fine

My car has a tappet sound as well but honda recommends valve adjustment around 100,000 miles.

I hear the same thing about the oil (conventional vs synthetic) but I run my engine at the extreme of operating conditions so I want the viscosity and detergents. Normal operation is different.
 

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I expected to hear a difference after my valve adjustment. That was not the case. Don't expect a miracle.
 

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so far all the advice i have heard on here appears to be 100% right. i just wanted to post this for the hell of it.. not to disprove anyone..

Myth #1: Synthetic motor oils damage seals.

Untrue. It would be foolhardy for lubricant manufacturers to build a product that is incompatible with seals. The composition of seals presents problems that both petroleum oils and synthetics must overcome. Made from elastomers, seals are inherently difficult to standardize.

Ultimately it is the additive mix in the oil that counts. Additives to control seal swell, shrinkage and hardening are required, whether it be a synthetic or petroleum product that is being produced.

Myth #2: Synthetics are too thin to stay in the engine.

Untrue. In order for a lubricant to be classified in any SAE grade (10W-30, 10W-40, etc) it has to meet certain guidelines with regard to viscosity ("thickness").

For example, it makes no difference whether it is 10W-40 petroleum or 10W-40 synthetic, at -25 degrees centigrade (-13F) and 100 degrees centigrade (212 degrees F) that oil has to maintain a standardized viscosity or it can't be rated a 10W-40.

Myth #3: Synthetics cause cars to use more oil.

Untrue. Synthetic motor oils are intended to use in mechanically sound engines, that is, engines that don't leak. In such engines oil consumption will actually be reduced. First, because of the lower volatility of synlubes. Second, because of the better sealing characteristics between piston rings and cylinder walls. And finally, because of the superior oxidation stability (i.e. resistance of synthetics against reacting with oxygen at high temperatures.)

Myth #4: Synthetic lubricants are not compatible with petroleum.

Untrue. The synthesized hydrocarbons, polyalphaolefins, diesters and other materials that form the base stocks of high quality name brand synthetics are fully compatible with petroleum oils. In the old days, some companies used untested ingredients that were not compatible, causing quality synlubes to suffer a bum rap. Fortunately, those days are long gone.

Compatibility is something to keep in mind, however, whether using petroleum oils or synthetics. It is usually best to use the same oil for topping off that you have been running in the engine. That is, it is preferable to not mix your oils, even if it is Valvoline or Quaker State you are using. The reason is this: the functions of additives blended for specific characteristics can be offset when oils with different additive packages are put together. For optimal performance, it is better to use the same oil throughout.

Myth#5: Synthetic lubricants are not readily available.

Untrue. This may have been the case two decades ago when AMSOIL and Mobil1 were the only real choices, but today nearly every major oil company has added a synthetic product to their lines. This in itself is a testament to the value synthetics offer. But, beware, many of the other "syntheitcs" are not true PAO (Polyalphaolefin) syntheitcs (ie: Castrol Syntec, Penzoil, etc...) they are hydroisomerized petroleum oil or an ester based synthetic blend.

Myth #6: Synthetic lubricants produce sludge.

Untrue. In point of fact, synthetic motor oils are more sludge resistant than their petroleum counterparts, resisting the effects of high temperatures and oxidation. In the presence of high temperatures, two things happen. First, an oil's lighter ingredients boil off, making the oil thicker. Second, many of the complex chemicals found naturally in petroleum basestocks begin to react with each other, forming sludges, gums and varnishes. One result is a loss of fluidity at low temperatures, slowing the timely flow of oil to the engine for vital engine protection. Further negative effects of thickened oil include the restriction of oil flow to critical areas, greater wear and loss of fuel economy.

Because of their higher flash points, and their ability to withstand evaporation loss and oxidation, synthetics are much more resistant to sludge development.

Two other causes of sludge - ingested dirt and water dilution - can be a problem in any kind of oil, whether petroleum or synthetic. These are problems with the air filtration system and the cooling system resoectively, not the oil.

Myth #7: Synthetics can't be used with catalytic converters or oxygen sensors.

Untrue. There is no difference between synthetic and petroleum oils in regards to these components. Both synthetic and petroleum oils are similar compounds and neither si damaging to catalytic converters or oxygen sensors.

Myth #8: Synthetics void warranties.

Untrue. No major manufacturer of automobiles specifically bans the use of synthetic lubricants. In point of fact, increasing numbers of high performance cars are arriving on the showroom floors with synthetic motor oils as factory fill.

New vehicle warranties are based upon the use of oils meeting specific API Service Classifications (for example SG/CE). Synthetic lubricants which meet current API Service requirements are perfectly suited for use in any vehicle without affecting the validity of the new car warranty. In point of fact, in the over 25 years that AMSOIL Synthetic Lubricants have been used in extended service situations, over billions of miles of actual driving, these oils have not been faulted once for voiding an automaker's warranty.

Myth #9: Synthetics last forever.

Untrue. Although some experts feel that synthetic basestocks themselves can be used forever, it is well known that eventually the additives will falter and cause the oil to require changing. Moisture, fuel dilution and acids (the by-products of combustion) tend to use up additives in an oil, allowing degradation to occur.

However , by "topping off", additives can be replenished. Through good filtration and periodic oil analysis, synthetic motor oils protect an engine for lengths of time far beyond the capability of non-synthetics.

Myth #10: Synthetics are too expensive.

Untrue. Tests and experience have proven that synthetics can greatly extend drain intervals, provide better fuel economy, reduce engine wear and enable vehicles to operate with greater reliability. All these elements combine to make synthetic engine oils more economical that conventional non-synthetics.

In Europe, synthetics have enjoyed increasing acceptance as car buyers look first to performance and long term value rather than initial price. As more sophisticated technology places greater demands on today's motor oils, we will no doubt see an increasing re-evaluation of oil buying habits in this country as well.
 

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I expected to hear a difference after my valve adjustment. That was not the case. Don't expect a miracle.
Exactly the same here if anything its more noticeable now I was thinking they just needed adjustment . It seems louder after 100k miles and I`m now at 130K miles but the car still runs like the day I bought it .
 

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BRWNFLSH now
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6,650 Posts
It seems most people use synthetic oil, so they can extend the change interval. Well, this is what Honda says in the owner's manual.


I use synthetic, because it's better oil, not because I want to leave it in the engine longer. The synthetic oil will get contaminated just like regular dino oil does.
 

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07 I4 MT coupe
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My $.02 is that I have ran full synthetic in my various cars for the last 18 years and find it pretty much about the same as normal oil. As long as you drain the old oil out between switching from one to the other you shouldn't really experience a problem. I have always heard that you should not mix (in large amounts) them though.
 

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Registered
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My $.02 is that I have ran full synthetic in my various cars for the last 18 years and find it pretty much about the same as normal oil. As long as you drain the old oil out between switching from one to the other you shouldn't really experience a problem. I have always heard that you should not mix (in large amounts) them though.
As far as I know, synthetic and conventional oils can be mixed in any amounts without any consequences.
 

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I was using conventional Honda 5-20 oil before. I switched to synthetic 5-20 oil now. I think my engine is making a much louder tic tic tic noise now on initial start-up in cold weathers. That noise was actually there from before but I feel it is more conspicuous now. :dunno:
 
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