Drive Accord Honda Forums banner

1 - 20 of 214 Posts

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Recently I have received questions from several forum members about the conversion from OEM low beam H11 halogen bulbs to brighter H9 halogen bulbs. This OEM H11 is 1,350 lumens; the replacement H9 bulb is 2,100 lumens (see below).

The H9 bulb is available from Amazon for $7.26 each, with free shipping if you have Prime. If not, you will need an order of $25 for free shipping (buy 4 and have spares or share).


Converting to H9 bulbs instead of HID has the disadvantage of having a yellower light than HID. Although H9 light is whiter than H11, it is not as white as HID. The advantages include a better light throw since the Accord projectors are for halogen, not HID. The H9 fitment is the same as the H11; not true of HIDs. The other advantage is the lower initial cost of less than $15.

I am including some back up material below from Daniel Stern Lighting and some pictures from the NASIOC Subaru forum showing the simple mod needed to convert the H9s. The night pictures are of Subaru low beams so they are not directly applicable to our Accord, but give a general idea of H11 low beams (first) and then H9 low beams.

My question and an email response from Daniel Stern concerning '13 Accord low beams:

My question: What do you recommend for a better low beam bulb in a 2013 Accord, which are now H11 55w Stanleys?

Stern's email answer: Your low beams take a 1350-lumen H11 bulb. You can easily, safely, and effectively replace this with a 2100-lumen H9 bulb, which you ought to be able to find locally by seeking the high beam bulb for a 2008 Chevrolet Malibu.

Use a good brand (GE, Philips, Osram-Sylvania) and stick to colorless clear bulbs, not any kind of "whiter light" bulb such as the Sylvania Silver Star scam.

Can also get online, http://store.candlepower.com/h-9.html .You may need to shave a small ridge of plastic off the H9 bulb's connector so that the H11 socket will snap on. Other than that, it's a direct swap.

The only disadvantage is shorter low beam bulb life — the H11 is optimised for very long life with relatively modest light output, while the H9 is optimised for very high output with relatively short life.

Note that the H9 swap is not universal; it works well in projector-type low beams but is not safe in most reflector-type low beams or in fog lamps of any type.

(End of Stern's answer).

Daniel Stern Lighting web site: http://www.danielsternlighting.com/home.html

NASIOC discussion and pictures: http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2083911
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
An excellent mod and one of my first. The difference in light output significant and readily apparent. Best $15 l ever spent.
 

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
From Stern above:

"The only disadvantage is shorter low beam bulb life — the H11 is optimised for very long life with relatively modest light output, while the H9 is optimised for very high output with relatively short life."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,561 Posts
HIDs, increased lumens, increased aesthetics, increased clarity with whiter output (if 4300K-5000K)

While this mod is welcomed and recommended by anti-HID folks, HIDs offer more benefits for not much cost.

Lighting purist (read: XXXXXXXXXX) claim HIDs aren't made for factory halogen projectors, XXXX them, as long as the light doesn't blind people or scatter out of control, then you are good to go as evidenced by many here who have done so already.
 

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Is H9 just as durable (long lasting) as H11?
It's hard to find a consensus on the rated life of the H9, but it appears to be 250 hours vs. 550 hours for the H11.

HIDs, increased lumens, increased aesthetics, increased clarity with whiter output (if 4300K-5000K)

While this mod is welcomed and recommended by anti-HID folks, HIDs offer more benefits for not much cost.

Lighting purist (read: snobs, analist) claim HIDs aren't made for factory halogen projectors, screw them, as long as the light doesn't blind people or scatter out of control, then you are good to go as evidenced by many here who have done so already.
You've really got a way with words, although a lot of your words are obnoxious and have nothing to do with the topic, e.g., "lighting purists", "snobs", "analist", "screw them".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Here is a good and true before/after of my conversion....
Before

After
 

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
No problem :)
 

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
It's been used for a long time in a lot of circumstances and I haven't heard of any such problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
Last week I drove at night for 4 hours and the H9 headlight started to dim for 1 second then back to full brightness. Was driving at 75mph on interstate, non-stop. Happened about 5 to 6 times for the duration of the trip. I took out the bulb and it didn't seem to get close to end of life yet, as the swirl is still perfect and nothing seems touching each other. So my question is, if H9 in headlight being turned on for a long time would actually kill the electrical system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
I noticed that dimming effect several days ago. Traced it to the air conditioner compressor switching on and off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,405 Posts
You've really got a way with words, although a lot of your words are obnoxious and have nothing to do with the topic, e.g., "lighting purists", "snobs", "analist", "screw them".
He is indeed a very cunning linguist. I couldn't resist-you put it on the tee and I just had to hit it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
While driving at high speed? Or idle?
I noticed it at idle. I first just noticed the lights flickering, and thought "WT*???" :dunno: Then a couple days later I had the window rolled down, and heard the compressor switch every time the lights flickered.
 

·
Retired G-Man
Joined
·
847 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
The 12V system on lots of cars are about at their limit. Electric steering on the Accord adds one more load. Car makers will be going to 48V systems in a few years. Indeed some have already started doing subsystems using 48V.

Reminds me of the span of features I have seen on cars, going back to my first car, a 6V straight-8, flat head '51 Pontiac Chieftan, try starting a 6V car in cold or rainy weather, forget it. Vacuum windshield wipers that completely stopped when accelerating. Power windows-no, power locks-no, power steering-no, power brakes-no, AC-no. It did have 4-speed HydraMatic transmission.

GM also had 1-speed (Buick DynaFlow), 2-Speed (Chevy PowerGlide), and 3-Speed (Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Cadillac) automatic transmissions.

But the Pontiac did have push button starting (after you turned it on with a key). Before that the starter "button" was a mechanical one on the floor. The best feature was the Indian (Native American) hood ornament that lit up with the headlights.
 
1 - 20 of 214 Posts
Top