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My car runs fine but noticed the fuel smell in the dipstick when I first checked it about a month ago. And then again tonight I still smell gas odor on the dipstick. I read on a forum (maybe here I can't remember) that new cars have extra additives in the oil to help with engine break in so maybe that is what I am smelling? This is my first turbo car so maybe it is normal? Just wondering if anyone else smells fuel on the dipstick or is it nothing to worry about...
 

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Captain Slow
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The 1.5L has issues with fuel dilution in the Civic and CR-V, and presumably also in the Accord; I wouldn't be surprised if the 2.0L does, too. I'm not aware of any abnormal engine wear that's been reported as a result, however. Honda has actually temporarily stopped selling CR-Vs with the 1.5L engine in China while they work on a fix. Honda stops selling new CR-Vs in China after recall plan rejected - Business Insider
 

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REV29K
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What's interesting to me is I have a 2017 CR-V with the 1.5T engine and I just did the first oil change per the Honda Maintenance Minder, it said I had about 10% oil life remaining at about 10,000 miles, and the oil did not smell of fuel at all. No different than any other oil smell on my other non-turbo Honda cars. So I'm kind of wondering why owners in China seem to be having a major problem that I'm not seeing on my CR-V. Is it the something different with the fuel I'm using versus what is sold in China?
 

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Captain Slow
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What's interesting to me is I have a 2017 CR-V with the 1.5T engine and I just did the first oil change per the Honda Maintenance Minder, it said I had about 10% oil life remaining at about 10,000 miles, and the oil did not smell of fuel at all. No different than any other oil smell on my other non-turbo Honda cars. So I'm kind of wondering why owners in China seem to be having a major problem that I'm not seeing on my CR-V. Is it the something different with the fuel I'm using versus what is sold in China?
Short trips are worse for fuel dilution. Are you putting a lot of highway miles on your CR-V? The type of gasoline here vs. there won't really have much if any impact, but the type of driving you do can make a big difference in how much fuel accumulates over time.

Also, this issue has been reported domestically as well; it's not China-specific. One example: https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/4341203/2016_Honda_Civic_1.5T_TGDI..DI
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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I read on a forum (maybe here I can't remember) that new cars have extra additives in the oil to help with engine break in so maybe that is what I am smelling?
New Honda's do have special 'break-in oil', but I don't know if that's what you're smelling.
The factory fills the engines with the same oil that you buy over the counter at the dealership. Honda does not use "break-in oil".

When the engine is assembled, certain parts are coated with assembly lube that contains molybdenum to protect the engine during its first few seconds of operation until the oil begins circulating for the first time. After the first few seconds of an engine's operating life, the assembly lube has no further function. The assembly lube can quickly turn the oil dark. It's not unusual for the engine to burn more oil during the first oil change interval.

For proper break-in, avoid heavy acceleration or full-throttle starts for the first 600 miles and don't perform the first oil change until the Maintenance Minder instructs you to do so. After that, fell free to change the oil every Sunday afternoon if you so desire.
 

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REV29K
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Short trips are worse for fuel dilution. Are you putting a lot of highway miles on your CR-V? The type of gasoline here vs. there won't really have much if any impact, but the type of driving you do can make a big difference in how much fuel accumulates over time.

Also, this issue has been reported domestically as well; it's not China-specific. One example: https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/4341203/2016_Honda_Civic_1.5T_TGDI..DI
Mixed driving, some city, some hwy, maybe a 60/40 mix. On the CRV we are averaging about 28mpg, while others average more like 32mpg-34mpg on the 1.5T engine. So I'd say we are a bit more heavy footed, not really concered about mileage since our old CR-V with the 2.4L NA engine would average closer to 24mpg. So with more power, slightly more aggressive driving, we still see a 15% increase in mileage.

I've read lots of various info on the internet about fuel dilution in the oil, however, I've not seen anyone really point to the damage it may cause. Seems like if you just follow the manufacturer recommended maintenance intervals, everything is fine.

I've not noticed any increase in oil level on the dipstick so far on our CR-V. All seems pretty normal.

So from reading the 9 pages of that thread, this is what I gathered from his 2016 1.5T Civic:

1) The OP had high fuel dilution from the report. Another owner had the oil analyzed and had barely a trace amount of fuel in the oil.

2) The owner loves to change the oil and experiment with various oil brands and various viscosity.

3) It seems to be worse in the extreme cold, maybe lots of idling in the WI winter.

4) Everyone hypothesizes what his high fuel dilution might do to the engine, but no facts.

5) Another oil analysis showed much improved results (warm weather) on the same engine.

6) The OP does see a rising oil level between changes.

Overall, none of that bothers me. Particularly since so far, I've not experienced any of that in our CR-V and I live in a warmer climate. However, the OP may have a problem and Honda was willing to listen and asked that he monitor the oil level every 1,000 miles.

Finally, the last post was almost 3 months ago, he hasn't reported any updates or if Honda thinks there is even a problem.
 

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The factory fills the engines with the same oil that you buy over the counter at the dealership. Honda does not use "break-in oil".

When the engine is assembled, certain parts are coated with assembly lube that contains molybdenum to protect the engine during its first few seconds of operation until the oil begins circulating for the first time. After the first few seconds of an engine's operating life, the assembly lube has no further function. The assembly lube can quickly turn the oil dark. It's not unusual for the engine to burn more oil during the first oil change interval.

For proper break-in, avoid heavy acceleration or full-throttle starts for the first 600 miles and don't perform the first oil change until the Maintenance Minder instructs you to do so. After that, fell free to change the oil every Sunday afternoon if you so desire.

I was under the impression they used a break in oil as well. Thank you for letting me know otherwise
 

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The factory fills the engines with the same oil that you buy over the counter at the dealership. Honda does not use "break-in oil".

When the engine is assembled, certain parts are coated with assembly lube that contains molybdenum to protect the engine during its first few seconds of operation until the oil begins circulating for the first time. After the first few seconds of an engine's operating life, the assembly lube has no further function. The assembly lube can quickly turn the oil dark. It's not unusual for the engine to burn more oil during the first oil change interval.

For proper break-in, avoid heavy acceleration or full-throttle starts for the first 600 miles and don't perform the first oil change until the Maintenance Minder instructs you to do so. After that, fell free to change the oil every Sunday afternoon if you so desire.
Honda's recommendation to NOT change oil until the Maintenance Minder instructs one to do so, adds to the question DO or Don't they use a "break-in" oil? I don't know what Honda does for initial oil fill however, if they don't use a specific formula in their factory fill, why do they make such a point of NOT to change till Minder says? Perhaps their manual writer tends to overstate, unlike most other manufactures? Or Honda just doesn't want their dealership changing oil too often?
 

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Captain Slow
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Mixed driving, some city, some hwy, maybe a 60/40 mix. On the CRV we are averaging about 28mpg, while others average more like 32mpg-34mpg on the 1.5T engine. So I'd say we are a bit more heavy footed, not really concered about mileage since our old CR-V with the 2.4L NA engine would average closer to 24mpg. So with more power, slightly more aggressive driving, we still see a 15% increase in mileage.

I've read lots of various info on the internet about fuel dilution in the oil, however, I've not seen anyone really point to the damage it may cause. Seems like if you just follow the manufacturer recommended maintenance intervals, everything is fine.

I've not noticed any increase in oil level on the dipstick so far on our CR-V. All seems pretty normal.

So from reading the 9 pages of that thread, this is what I gathered from his 2016 1.5T Civic:

1) The OP had high fuel dilution from the report. Another owner had the oil analyzed and had barely a trace amount of fuel in the oil.

2) The owner loves to change the oil and experiment with various oil brands and various viscosity.

3) It seems to be worse in the extreme cold, maybe lots of idling in the WI winter.

4) Everyone hypothesizes what his high fuel dilution might do to the engine, but no facts.

5) Another oil analysis showed much improved results (warm weather) on the same engine.

6) The OP does see a rising oil level between changes.

Overall, none of that bothers me. Particularly since so far, I've not experienced any of that in our CR-V and I live in a warmer climate. However, the OP may have a problem and Honda was willing to listen and asked that he monitor the oil level every 1,000 miles.

Finally, the last post was almost 3 months ago, he hasn't reported any updates or if Honda thinks there is even a problem.
There are many people on BITOG with a degree of eccentricity when it comes to changing their oil; that's to be expected on a forum devoted to lubrication, but this doesn't diminish their claims. The aforementioned is but one of several. The stop-sale in China adds a significant amount of credibility, but it doesn't tell you whether there is a legitimate concern from the standpoint of engine life or if Honda is reacting to public pressure, which can be just as strong if it impacts sales. I tend to suspect the latter, but I also hope (and expect) the OLM is calibrated to account for dilution in the case of an extreme short-tripper. Gas in the oil certainly isn't a good thing.

I would not be overly concerned about the issue at this point either, not unless the situation changes and you begin experiencing dilution to the point where the level on the dipstick increases when you check your oil. All gasoline engines run rich when cold so it makes sense that cold weather would be worse; if you're not experiencing problems thus far, it's unlikely you will over the spring or summer, either.
 

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Keep in mind that damage from oil fuel dilution would be increased wear assuming the dilution is small but still abnormally high. That said, the engine will not exhibit any signs of damage until engine tolerances exceed design limits at which point blow by, oil burning, compression loss, etc. will be noticed. The rate determines where in the life of the engine this occurs but it would likely be way after warranty coverage expires. Whether Honda stands by the product when one experiences this issue is the question.


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Honda's recommendation to NOT change oil until the Maintenance Minder instructs one to do so, adds to the question DO or Don't they use a "break-in" oil? I don't know what Honda does for initial oil fill however, if they don't use a specific formula in their factory fill, why do they make such a point of NOT to change till Minder says? Perhaps their manual writer tends to overstate, unlike most other manufactures? Or Honda just doesn't want their dealership changing oil too often?
It might be that Honda wants that moly to stay in the oil for the full 8+K miles.

I see no reason whatsoever to ignore this specific request from Honda.
 

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Sealed with ceramic coat
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My car runs fine but noticed the fuel smell in the dipstick when I first checked it about a month ago. And then again tonight I still smell gas odor on the dipstick. I read on a forum (maybe here I can't remember) that new cars have extra additives in the oil to help with engine break in so maybe that is what I am smelling? This is my first turbo car so maybe it is normal? Just wondering if anyone else smells fuel on the dipstick or is it nothing to worry about...

Your problem is not unique to Honda. Some owners of GM 2.0 Turbos have reported similar troubles.
Ongoing Issue
 

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Gearless
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China stopping sales of the CR-V and Civic.

BEIJING (Reuters) - Japan’s Honda Motor Co (7267.T) has halted new sales of CR-V crossovers in China and may have to do the same with its Civic model after a Chinese watchdog rejected the automaker’s plan to recall 350,000 of the cars to fix a problem.

The recalls are aimed at fixing a problem caused by an unusual amount of un-combusted petrol collecting in the engine’s lubricant oil pan.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-honda-china-recall/honda-stops-selling-new-cr-vs-in-china-after-recall-plan-rejected-idUSKCN1GE1P8
 

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This applies only to the 1.5T in the CR-V. At least in the USA, you can still get the LX CR-V with the 2.4L standard engine. The LX CR-V is more popular than it was in the past. More people are buying the LX now (for the engine).
 

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This applies only to the 1.5T in the CR-V. At least in the USA, you can still get the LX CR-V with the 2.4L standard engine. The LX CR-V is more popular than it was in the past. More people are buying the LX now (for the engine).
Same exact engine in the Civic and Accord. I wouldn't be surprised to see it pop up in the Accord. The article says the problem is in the Civic too.
 

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This applies only to the 1.5T in the CR-V. At least in the USA, you can still get the LX CR-V with the 2.4L standard engine. The LX CR-V is more popular than it was in the past. More people are buying the LX now (for the engine).
Only about 20% of Civics are sold with the 1.5T, but about 75% of CR-V's currently sold are EX's and above with the 1.5T, so the CR-V introduced that engine to the masses. About 80% of Accords are sold with the 1.5T.

The CR-V LX, Acura ILX, and Acura TLX are the last Hondas with the 2.4L - it's not long for this world.
 

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But is it a design flaw or QC issue?

Pretty sure Honda cars in China are also made in China as well, under Dongfeng Honda.

Sent via MHA-L29. Whatever.
 
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