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HardCoreHondaLover
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88 Posts
I came across a video where the guys is using a tool specifically made to take the tension off the belt. It's called a Schley 10950 Honda Serpentine Belt Tensioner. I haven't tried it, but it looks like it would make the job easier.

Thanks for all the feedback. I didn't know about the arrow and bar. I just checked mine and it's off by about 1/4"-1/2". Does this indicate the belt has gotten stretched quite a bit over time?

How difficult is it to replace the belt? My mechanic said they charge $155 for replacement. It looks like it could be a little frustrating feeding it through. I do work on my car (headlights, O2 sensor, plugs and simple things like that). I'm just not sure if this is something I can tackle. On a scale of 1-10, what's the difficulty rating?



Thanks,

Andy
 

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HardCoreHondaLover
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88 Posts
It takes less than 10 minutes with a socket and maybe an extension bar.
google it

Thanks for that video! Doesn't look that bad. I called O'Reilly and Advance Auto Parts and both rent a belt tensioner tool, so I think that's the route I'll go (I don't have a long 14 mm wrench).

I just watched another video and it provided one additional tip. In it, he uses what looks like about a 2' hollow metal tube with the very end bent about 2". He uses it to help guide the belt in place on the very back, bottom pulley (that it's the crankshaft pulley):


Right around 3:20 is where the metal tube is shown.

Is an OEM belt from a Honda dealer recommended, or is a belt from O'Reilly, Advance Auto Parts or AutoZone just as good?
 

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NOT your average Joe
2006 Accord EX Sedan, 2.4ℓ & 5-spd Auto
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223 Posts
I wouldn't hesitate to use an aftermarket belt provided it was a high end brand such as Gates, etc. Same for hoses, provided they're formed correctly just like the originals. I use Purolator aftermarket filters for both engine air and cabin air. On previous vehicles (not Hondas) Iused almost exclusively aftermarket parts, being careful about the quality. Rarely had an issue in a cumulative 1mm miles.

As long as you buy the good stuff at a parts store, the majority of parts are at OE specs or better. Many of them are made by the same supplier and simply packaged differently. I'm an engineer and spent about a decade & a half in the automotive industry doing safety critical stuff - Steering, Suspension, & Brakes. Talk about pressure!
 

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HardCoreHondaLover
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88 Posts

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HardCoreHondaLover
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88 Posts
I went ahead and paid the premium for the OEM belt ($62 at the dealer). I was reading reviews on some of the after market belts and some complained about the belt squealing (it was either the Gates or Bando brand). This will be the last belt on my car (it has 242,000 miles), so the OEM gives me some peace of mind.

Thanks for all the info!
 

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HardCoreHondaLover
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88 Posts
Got my belt replaced today. My Honda dealer hosed me. I gave them all the specs (make, model etc.) when I picked up the belt about 3 weeks ago. I pulled the old belt off today and found out the belt Honda sold me is about a foot shorter than the old one. So, rather than drive 25 minutes back to them, I ran up to Autozone (15 minutes away) and bought a Continental belt ($25 cheaper!) and also rented their serpentine belt tool.

It took me all of 3 minutes to get it off but about 25 to get it back on. The worst part is getting it on the lower back "wheel" and also keeping tension on it (once it's around that wheel) as you try to get the belt up around the tensioner and upper "wheel". I took a tip from a Youtube video and picked up an 1/8" (or it might have been 1/4") metal rod at Home Depot, then bent it at the end (about an inch) to create a hook/L-shape. This made it fairly easy to help nudge the belt in place on the bottom rear wheel. Without it, you'd have to get lucky getting it on or go under the car. That rod I mentioned earlier can be found in the area where there's other sized rods and metal brackets.

Do yourself a favor and rent the serpentine belt tool at your local auto parts store. I used a 14mm socket (which their kit didn't include), but all I really needed was that thin flat bar (the serpentine belt tool) to get the job done.

Also, if you look at my earlier pic of the marks on the tensioner, you can see the arrow was at least 1/4" off it's mark. Now it's almost spot on. When I put the old and new belt next too each other, I'd say the old one was about 1/2" longer. But other than the old belt being stretched a bit, it appeared to be in good shape.

523214
 
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