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You can call me Jackal
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DIY: Installing P2R Ported Intake Runners on an '08 EX-L Coupe (V65AT)

This process is done to replace your OEM intake runners with ported intake runners. The P2R ported runners are actually Honda OEM parts machined out by 12mm each runner, increasing available airflow to the engine by a total of 24mm.

I suggest waiting at least 1 hour after operating the car before attempting this installation. You will be reaching around the engine bay frequently and there is a very good chance you will burn yourself if working on a hot engine. The best time would be on a Saturday morning or something before you even take the car out.

Approx. Installation Time: 2 to 3 hours. This is an "out with the old, in with the new" type installation by removing a number of nuts, bolts, and a few hoses.

Parts You'll Need:


Tools You'll Need:

  • Flathead Screwdriver
  • 10mm Socket Wrench and 10mm Hex Wrench
  • 12mm Socket Wrench and 10mm Hex Wrench
  • Socket Wrench Extension
  • Pliers
  • Shop light or flashlight (opt.)

Preparation

You will need to release pressure from the fuel lines. Do this by removing FUSE #9 from the fusebox located under the steering wheel inside the vehicle’s cabin. It is a 20amp fuse (yellow). Once the fuse is removed, attempt to start your car. The car will not turn over. Do this 3 or 4 times for a few seconds each. This fuel lines should be clear of pressure at this point.

Engage the parking (emergency) brake. You’re going to be doing some pulling and pushing under the hood that will likely rock the car. I found that engaging the parking brake make it much easier to gain necessary leverage once under the hood since the car wasn’t swaying back and forth in park.

Disconnect the battery. Use the 10mm socket wrench to loosen the connectors. Once disconnected, wrap the connector leads in clean shop rags or towels to prevent them from accidentally making contact with the body of the car. I use old mismatched socks.

Remove the plastic engine cover. This is done by turning the two black plastic screws ¼ turn so that the grooves are vertical instead of horizontal. You can simply pull the cover off at this point.

Lastly, Protect your vehicle. Place large towels over the sides and front bumper of your car and tuck them into your engine bay. This will prevent scratches and other damage from being inflicted upon your vehicle when you’re leaning into the engine bay and moving around. It will also protect it from any dropped tools that may chip your paint or unintended fluid spills/leaks. (LFMF - Your pants will wipe dry dirt, rocks, etc. into the paint and leave some serious micromaring swirls. I protected my sides but not my front and now I need a serious detailing to get all the small scratches out of my front bumper/grill caused by my jeans rubbing on the paint.)
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Step 1: Disconnecting the Intake from the Throttle Body

Step 1: Disconnecting the Intake from the Throttle Body

Throttle Body Hoses/Harness (Images 1-3):

  • Using the flathead screwdriver, loosen the clamp securing your intake hose to the throttle body (Image 1). Don’t worry about removing the actual hose until later.

    Image 1


  • Using the pliers to hold open the pinch clamps, disconnect the four hoses attached to the throttle body (Images 2 & 3- in blue). One of the hoses is directly under the intake. Don’t be alarmed when a little bit of coolant leaks out of the two tubes on the right. Just have some paper towels ready.

  • Remove the two electronic harnesses connected the throttle body (Image 2 – in red).
Image 2


Image 3
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Step 2: Removing the Intake Manifold

Step 2: Removing the Intake Manifold

2.1 Plenium Cover (Image 4):

  • Using the 10mm socket wrench, remove all 10 bolts and 2 nuts securing the cover.

  • Carefully pry up the cover being mindful of the rubber gasket inside/underneath.
Image 4



2.2. Intake Manifold (Image 5):

Once the cover is removed, you have access to the nuts and bolts which secure the intake manifold to the rest of the engine. You will now remove the whole manifold.

  • Using the 10mm socket wrench, remove the 6 bolts and 2 washer-nuts securing the manifold. You will need a deep-well socket to remove the 2 washer-nuts.

  • Using the 12mm socket wrench, remove the 7 bolts securing the manifold.
Image 5


With all the bolts removed, you should be able to slide the intake manifold straight up the guiding rails (secured by the washers in the upper-right most circle and bottom-left most circle) and off of the engine. You now have access to the fuel rails and, below them, the intake runners.
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Step 3: Removing the Fuel Rails

Step 3: Removing the Fuel Rails

Fuel Rails (Images 6 - 8):

  • Unclip the six electronic harnesses connected to the fuel rails. Also disconnect the small blue clips securing the harness wires to the rails themselves (Image 6).

    Image 6


  • Underneath each fuel rail are two 10mm bolts that will require the 10mm extension to access. Remove all four fuel rail bolts (Image 7).

    Image 7


  • Carefully but firmly remove each fuel rail by pulling the fuel injectors out of the intake runners (Image 8). They should pop right out given enough even pressure. If you accidentally pull too hard or unevenly, you run the risk of disconnecting the injector from the rail, resulting in fuel spilling out.

    Image 8


  • Using the 12mm socket wrench, remove the fuel rail bracket bolt (Image 9). This will allow you to completely move the fuel rails out of the way of the intake runners. I just folded mine over to the right side of the engine bay.

    Image 9
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Step 4: Removing the OEM Intake Runners

Step 4: Removing the OEM Intake Runners

4.1. Electronic Harness (Image 10):

  • Unclip the electronic harness located near the bottom left corner of the OEM intake runners.

  • Using the 10mm socket wrench and an extension, remove the bolt securing the harness bracket to the body. This will allow you easier access to the front left-most bolt securing the OEM intake runners.

    Image 10


4.2. Intake Runners (Images 11 & 12):

I apologize that I did not take any pictures of this portion of the installation. It was by far the most difficult part in terms of accessing the nuts and bolts necessary to remove the intake runners. I was so caught up in problem-solving the access issue that I didn’t think to take pictures. In addition, the spaces were so tight that any pictures would have likely been useless. If you’ve made it this far in the installation process, you will be able to work off the exploded diagram in Image 11 as I did.

  • Using the 12mm socket wrench, the 12mm hex wrench, the socket extensions, and a bit of luck*, remove the three bolts and two nuts securing the front OEM intake runner. Removing the front one first will allow you much easier access to the back runner and I believe it is nearly impossible to remove the back one first anyway.

    (* You will have to get creative in these small spaces to break the bolts from place. Once loosened, you can use your fingers to unscrew them and take them out since your hand might fit easier through the small spaces. BE CAREFUL not to drop any of the nuts or bolts, especially if you don’t have a magnetic pen handy. I spent 20 minutes of this install trying to retrieve a hex wrench that fell into a crevice. I can’t imagine having dropped the bolt…)

  • Once the three bolts and two nuts are removed, you should be able to wiggle the front OEM intake runner off the metal gasket and up over the threaded studs that the nuts came off of.

    Image 11


    Now repeat this process for the rear OEM intake runner (Image 12):

  • Using the 12mm socket wrench and the 12mm hex wrench, remove the two bolts and two nuts securing the rear OEM intake runner. Note this runner only requires the removal of two bolts instead of three.

  • Once the two bolts and two nuts are removed, you should be able to wiggle the rear OEM intake runner off the metal gasket and up over the threaded studs that the nuts came off of.

    Image 12


  • With the intake runners removed, you will now need to remove the threaded guiding rails. There is one in each intake runner near the corner (Image 13). Transfer these guide rails to the new P2R intake runners before installing the new runners.

    * To remove the guides, use the two-nut method. If you are unfamiliar, the method works like this: Take one of the 10mm washer-nuts you removed in Step 2.2 and thread it on the guiding rail, about half way down, upside-down. Take the second 10mm washer-nut and thread it on the same rail, right-side-up. Tighten the two nuts together. Now, gripping the bottom nut with the hex wrench, you should be able to unscrew the guide rail. Then separate the two washer-nuts and repeat on the other guide rail.
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Step 5: Installing the P2R Ported Intake Runners

Step 5: Installing the P2R Ported Intake Runners

:banana: the hard stuff is done! You are now ready to install the new P2R Ported Intake Runners. Your engine bay should look something like this:



In order to install the new runners, you are basically going to reverse steps 4 through 1 and effectively reinstall everything you just uninstalled. Unless otherwise specified, there are no torque specs. for reinstallation. I use a "flush + 1/4 turn" rule of thumb.

5.1. P2R Ported Intake Runners

  • Making sure the metal gasket is in place, install the rear intake runner by sliding over the engine studs. Attach it using the two 12mm nuts and two 12mm bolts you previously removed. Make sure they are on securely but you don't want to overtighten them. Remember, this part of your engine gets pretty hot and the metal will expand.

  • Repeat the above for the front intake runner, making sure to resecure all three bolts and two nuts you previously removed.

  • Slide the new, white plastic thermal gasket you purchased from P2R over the guiding rails and adjust so it is properly seated on the intake runners. It can only go on one way to sit correctly.

  • Using the 10mm socket wrench and extension, reattach the bracket and reconnect the electronic harness to the left of the intake runners you removed in step 4.1b

5.2. Fuel Rails
  • Carefully slide the fuel injectors into the new intake runners, pressing evenly but firmly to make sure all three injectors on each side are properly seated.

  • Reinstall the two 10mm bolts that secure each fuel rail to the runners.

  • Reclip the six electronic harnesses connected to the fuel rails. Also reconnect the small blue clips securing the harness wires to the rails themselves.

  • Using the 12 socket wrench, reinstall the fuel rail bracket bolt removed in Image 9.

5.3. Intake Manifold
  • Slide the intake manifold over the guide rails and properly seat it atop the intake runner assembly.

  • Using the 10mm socket wrench, reinstall the 6 bolts and 2 washer-nuts securing the manifold (@8.7 lb.ft.). You will need a deep-well socket to secure the 2 washer-nuts.

  • Using the 12mm socket wrench, reinstall the 7 bolts securing the manifold (@16 lb.ft.).

  • Making sure the red, rubber gasket is properly seated inside the upper cover, use the 10mm socket wrench to reinstall all 10 bolts and 2 nuts securing the cover (@8.7 lb.ft.).

5.4. Throttle Body Hoses/Harness, etc.

  • Reattach all four hoses making sure the rubber hose slides over the metal ridge (nipple) on the tubes. Failure to properly secure hoses creates the likelihood that one may come loose while driving the vehicle. Obviously, that would not be good, so take your time and do this right.

  • Reattach the electronic harnesses to the throttle body.

  • Reattach the intake hose to the intake manifold/throttle body assembly and secure the clamp using the flathead screwdriver.

  • Reinstall the #9 fuse for the fuel pump.

  • Reconnect the battery.
You should now be ready to start up your vehicle. BEFORE YOU DO, make one more visual inspection of the engine bay. Make sure everything is connected, installed, attached as it should be. Make sure you didn't leave any tools in the engine bay. REMOVE the towel protecting your car's paint so one doesn't accidentally get caught in a belt.

When you turn your key, the car should fire up almost immediately. Let the car idle for a good 60 seconds. This will allow all the vital fluids to circulate through the engine. At this point, listen for any unusual puttering, whistling, and vibrations. Whistling or puttering suggests a hose isn't properly secured. Vibrations could indicate a bolt wasn't secured properly.

Take your car for a spin around the block a couple times and allow the engine to get up to operating temp. This will allow the gaskets to set properly and the metal in your engine to expand. Once it gets to temp, find a nice quiet stretch of road and do what you know in your heart to be right....FLOOR IT. :D

Congrats on your undertaking. I know this isn't an easy installation, but it's undeniably worth it!

Happy According!
 

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youtube.com/justahondaaccord
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This is a great DIY, very well written and thought out. It makes me want to buy ported intake runners right now. I need to take a small break from modding but I will likely be picking these up next month, install is easier than I would have anticipated, looks like the only difficult part of it will be accessing the bolts on the intake runners. I wonder if using wobble sockets or a universal joint on a bendable ratchet would make accessing them easier.

If I could add one thing, when you first remove the intake manifold I would take a CLEAN rag, with no loose lint or even a CLEAN paper towel and stuff it into each of the 6 ports of the intake runner, not deep just there in case you accidentally drop a bolt in one of them that could go down into the head, which would be the biggest potential risk of doing this install. A guy on my legacy forum did a TGV delete install, which requires you to remove the intake manifold and didn’t plug the ports going to the head. He accidentally dropped a washer into one of the ports and couldn’t get it out, long story short he hoped his mind was playing tricks on him and that he hadn’t dropped the washer into the port, ended up starting the car and blew the motor.
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is a great DIY, very well written and thought out. ...

He accidentally dropped a washer into one of the ports and couldn’t get it out, long story short he hoped his mind was playing tricks on him and that he hadn’t dropped the washer into the port, ended up starting the car and blew the motor.
Thanks man. Yeah that was the definitely the hardest part. I kept damning the fact that I didn't have wobble-joints. I asked two of my neighbors if they did and neither had them, so I just had to tough it out. They would make this install 10x easier.

And as for plugging the ports, that's a great idea. Absolutely better to be safe than sorry. You could also take a piece of aluminum foil or plastic wrap and cover the top of the intake runners as well. I don't like stuffing rags into ports simply because sometimes they leave behind dust or lint. A clean shoprag would work fine though I'm sure.

Thanks for the added input, it's always welcome!
 

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youtube.com/justahondaaccord
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Thanks man. Yeah that was the definitely the hardest part. I kept damning the fact that I didn't have wobble-joints. I asked two of my neighbors if they did and neither had them, so I just had to tough it out. They would make this install 10x easier.

And as for plugging the ports, that's a great idea. Absolutely better to be safe than sorry. You could also take a piece of aluminum foil or plastic wrap and cover the top of the intake runners as well. I don't like stuffing rags into ports simply because sometimes they leave behind dust or lint. A clean shoprag would work fine though I'm sure.

Thanks for the added input, it's always welcome!

That ****s you didn’t have access to a wobble socket or universal joint. I’m hoping when I do the install it will be easier with them.

Aluminum foil, great idea for blocking the ports safely. To add to that then setting a rag, towel or terry cloth on top of the foil would be safest way to prevent anything from going down the ports as a bolt could puncture the foil alone if you dropped it on it and you don’t want any lint to get down there.
 

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You can call me Jackal
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you sir. Let me know if you have any questions along the way!
 

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Black on Black on Black
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Did you feel a noticeable gain, sound, fuel mileage?
 

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You can call me Jackal
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did you feel a noticeable gain, sound, fuel mileage?
Absolutely and without a doubt. :thmsup: The car is noticeably faster and pulls way harder through the whole rpm range.

No increase in mpg but no decrease either.
 

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Hey, thanks for the write up! I'm gonna print it and use it as a reference tomorrow while I do the install :)
 

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This is awesome. I am in the process of modding my vehicle and I will defenitely be using this as a guide. I have a 7th gen but im sure its the same procedure.
 

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Thank you very much for this. I got to do mine today. Your DIY was great. The two bolts on the passenger side for the runners are a pain in the ass but did get it on. Thank you again.
 

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youtube.com/justahondaaccord
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Jackal I wrote up a DIY for this install after I put the runners on in april for the other forum. Meant to put it in this thread for some additional content for those doing the install to see how someone else did it if anyone cared to see. Hope you don't mind me posting it in your thread, here is what I posted regarding my DIY for 6 speed manual...

This is a write up for installing P2R ported intake runners for an 08+ Accord V6 6 speed. I wasn’t planning on writing a DIY but figured I should after struggling with one bolt heavily. It is a mostly complete DIY but I didn’t take pictures of the fuel rail or injectors. On a scale from 1 to 10 I would say this install would be a 5 for a seasoned vet with tools.

Tools Needed:


-3/8 Ratchet
-Several Extensions
-Offset 12mm Wrench
-12mm Wrench
-Universal Joint
-Auto Picks
-Needle Nose Pliers
-Anit-Seeze
-PB Blaster
-Magnet Stick (Extremely Important, Very Likely you will drop a bolt at some point)
-Aluminum Foil and shop rag
-Plastic Hose Clamp Pliers (Optional)
-Flex 12mm and Flex 10mm socket
The Flex 12mm socket I purchased from Sears was the most important tool I needed to complete the install, without it I could not remove the last bolt on the rear intake runner


Process:

First thing you want to do is get in your driver side and look underneath the dash and pull the fuel pump fuse. It is labeled on the fuse panel fuse #9, it’s a 20amp fuse.


After pulling the fuse put the key in the ignition and crank the car 3 times turning the key for 5 seconds a crank to empty out the pressure in the fuel lines to minimize the possibility of fuel spilling from an injector. Now the fuel lines are clear you can pop the hood and remove the battery terminals. After doing so you can start the prep to be able to remove the intake manifold.

Go ahead and remove the short accordian intake hose from the airbox to the throttle body. You just need to loosen both clamps on the hose on each end by turning the screw on the corresponding clamps with a screwdriver. Then use the needle nose pliers to loosen the clamp that holds the metal hose that runs into the intake hose and disconnect the metal hose. Also disconnect both rubber lines running to the bottom of the throttle body, some coolant will spill out. That is normal and you won’t lose much, you can minimize the spillage by using the plastic hose clamp pliers on the hose if you have any. After the coolant stops dripping you can also disconnect the sensor on top of the throttle body.



In the next pic and several going for I’m showing disconnecting the top sensor to the TB and also the hoses on the bottom of TB again, sorry for the redundancy. Remove the sensor of the side of the TB; also disconnect the line running from FPR. Also disconnect the sensor that runs to that component. The pic below shows what I had disconnected after doing so to have that section of the intake manifold free.



Disconnect the two lines running to the back of the manifold closest to the firewall.



Disconnect the sensor shown in the pic below and also the hose running to the front left of the manifold.



If you haven’t done so, turn the two plastic screws from the engine cover to the left and then remove the cover. Also remove all 10 10mm bolts and 2 10mm nuts on top of the manifold cover.


You can now carefully remove the intake manifold cover. Go ahead and remove the 7 12mm bolts. Remove the 2 10mm nuts using a deep socket. Then remove the remaining 6 10mm bolts. The two in the section on the right are different in length slightly than the other 4, they have a matte finish to the head of the bolt to distinguish them from the others. Remember that when putting the bolts back on.



You can now slide the intake manifold off the two studs. You can also remove the gasket on the intake runners. At this point I recommend covering the intake ports with some tin foil and then sitting a shop rag on top of the foil. You don’t want to drop a nut or tool into an intake runner port and pray you can get whatever you dropped out without removing a head.

This is where I dropped the ball on the DIY and failed to take pics of the fuel rails and injectors mounted. But if I had you will now see the fuel rail mounted on the front and rear intake runner. Disconnect the 6 electrical plugs to each of the 6 injectors 3 on the front runner 3 on the rear runner. The harness for the plugs that go to the injectors are clipped on to the fuel rail in two places on each rail with a zip tie clips, unclip the zip tie clip from the harness from the fuel rail by using the needle nose pliers on the bottom of the zip tie clips and the move the wiring harness for the injector plugs out of the way. Now you can go ahead and remove the two bolts running to each fuel rail on underneath the rail I believe they were 12mm bolts, might be 10mm.



After doing this you can start left to right, grab an injector with one hand and grab the rail with the other and shimmy out each injector one by one, when you have disconnected a set of 3 you can move the fuel rail out of the way, repeat those steps for the rear fuel rail.

After the fuel rails are out of the way, up on the left of the front intake runner, you will see a tough bolt to access. There is an electrical clip in the way for starters, unclip it. The plug that electrical clip you disconnected remains in the way and is connected to a small metal bracket. Remove the 10mm bolt to that bracket which is on the left side of that bracket then shimmy the bracket out and disconnect the plug from the bracket. You will now have some access to that bolt, I believe it’s a 12mm. I used a universal joint, 12mm socket and several extensions to get this bolt and had no issue. But looking back I would have used the flex12mm socket to remove it, would have been a little easier. Below I just am showing a couple pics of how I mounted the ratchet and socket on that bolt.





In the next few shots I’m showing the 2 nuts on the front intake runner and pointing to the back side of the intake runner to the remaining two 12mm nuts and using the offset 12mm wrench and another instance of using the universal joint and 12mm sockets to remove the two bolts on the back side of the front intake runner.









After the remaining two nuts and two bolts are removed you can remove the front intake runner. On the rear intake runner there are only two nuts and two bolts total unlike the front runner that had 5. In the pic below I show where the two nuts and two bolts on the rear intake runner are located.



Below are pics of using that trusted universal joint to remove the nuts on the rear intake runner.



The most difficult part of this entire installation was removing the last bolt on the rear intake runner, it is on the far left side underneath the intake runner ports. A universal 3/8 joint is just too thick to fit in there. A stubs wrench couldn’t get me the torque I needed to crack the bolt even after spraying the bolt with pb blaster. This is where that flex 12mm socket is worth its weight in gold, if you bought this tool from sears it is low enough profile to fit in there and it’s a six point socket that can get enough torque to crack the bolt. I didn’t have one at the time, and tried for 45 minutes to get that bolt loose but could not do so. I went to my neighbor who is a mechanic and he enlightened me on the flex 12mm socket, I borrowed it and had that bolt off within a minute. Went out and bought the 10mm, 12mm and 14mm flex socket from sears today. Figured those are the most common sizes for a Japanese car, if you got those sizes you should be good for future reference. It was 8$ a socket, harbor freight did not have a comparable low profile socket or I would have bought from there.





The last things you need to do prior to installing the P2R intake runners are remove the two studs from stock intake runners you removed. You can do this by getting the two nuts that were on the studs, install one nut first upside down, screw it down a few threads, then put the other nut on that stud and screw it on till it rests against the nut you screwed on upside down. Put a wrench on the nut on top and tighten turn it to the right, the stud will turn till it comes out. Install on the new intake runners in reverse order. Also there is a small metal fitting on the back of the rear intake runner, remove it and put it on the P2R intake runner. Reinstall the intake runners in reverse order on the two difficult bolts I put anti-seeze on the threads in case of having to do this again for some reason.

When you have the P2R intake runners installed I reused the stock gasket and then set the thermal gasket on top. Have your magnet stick handy, I used mine 3 different times. Also make sure when you reinstall the front intake runner you have access to the plug near the hard to access bolt, I didn’t remember to make that accessible and had to remove the front intake runner a second time to get it in a position so I could connect that sensor.

As for a quick review. The ported runners are definitely worth it, there is a very noticeable bump in torque from 2700rpm up to redline. If you are looking for a performance mod that will give you a significant bump in performance I highly recommend this mod. I feel it may have provided more power than the RV6 j pipe, definitely comparable in terms of how much power it added. The next DIY I will be writing up will be for the PCDs when I get them, it will be much more well documented than this one. But since there is little documentation on this install, figured it wouldn’t hurt to post what I have. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.A pic below shows a comparison between the ported runner and the stock, the ported one is on the bottom.

 
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