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I've been on a bit of a maintenance streak lately with draining and refilling coolant, replacing all brake pads and rotors, air and cabin filters and today was time to change the spark plugs. I hope this can be helpful to people. There is a great DIY already in the How-To section but I noticed people wanted pics of the rear bank of cylinders and how hard it was to get to them, so I figured I would do an updated thread.

The original Denso plugs had 156k miles on them and still looked great (for their age, no oily residue, good color). This process took me 65 minutes to do myself, but it can definitely be done quicker than that. I was just very methodical in taking my time, removing one bolt at a time and sitting it aside, and taking all the pics.

Tools and parts used:

NGK Laser Iridium IZFR6K11 (6 of them)
Permatex Anti-seize
Flathead Screwdriver
3/8'" Ratchet
6" Long 3/8" Extension
5/8" (16mm) Spark Plug Socket
6mm Allen Wrench
Bristle Brush (optional, but I like to brush away any dust before disassembling)

First remove the engine cover:


You will find this:



Unplug the wires from the coil packs by depressing the tab and lifting off:



Use the 6mm allen wrench to remove these bolts:



Lift out the coil packs:





A view inside:



Dirty from blow-by...no worries though, this is normal for high miles as plugs aren't perfectly sealed between the ceramic and metal:







Remove the plugs:













Old plugs:



Take out the new plugs and install a little anti-seize. Some people say use none, but I prefer to use it. The old ones did indeed come out easily, but I want to ensure they will again after another 150k miles. DO NOT gap the new plugs...they are already pre-gapped:



Then just repeat the steps above in reverse to finish off the front bank of plugs.

Now time for the rear. Here are some views of them:





Unplug the wires from the coil packs...brush handle pointing to it:





Use the 6mm allen wrench and remove the bolts holding the coil packs in place:





Remove the coil packs:















Now time to get those rear plugs out of there. I tried taking pics of how I positioned the socket and extension. A 5" extension will work too, but I prefer the 6" and you'll see why in the pics where the ratchet is connected:





Be careful around this plug:



And here is the plug:





And on to the other plugs:









A tight fit, but it can be done. Just take your time and be gentle:









Old plugs from rear bank:



Then just repeat all of the steps in reverse yet again and you are all done! She started up just fine and there may have been a decrease in the amount of time it takes the car to start...it started just fine before though. It also seemed to idle slightly smoother (again, it had a good idle before) and acceleration seemed to improve slightly. These could just be "placebo effects" of me performing the work, but I do feel it livened her up a little bit.

I hope this post is helpful for anyone considering to do the plugs themselves because you can save a TON of money compared to taking it to the dealership. Have a good weekend guys and gals. :thmsup:

-Mike
 
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Excellent write up! For 156k those plugs didn't look too bad. Also by looking at them its easy to tell that you've got a healthy V6. I'm sure others will be very happy to find this for some insight!
 

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you made..........

.........my day, Mike..........

With a careful, documented approach to the Gen7 V-6 plug change.

156,000 is over 20,000 more than my factory originals.....................


again, you made my day.

all the best,

ez
 

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Is it safe to say that OEM plugs can last 200k or more?

Trying to drag them on as much as possible
 

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Well done OP, excellent image quality, I'm good with my pro DSLR but could not muster the patience to take pix when I changed plugs last fall.

Just wait until you decide to do valve clearance check/adjustment, that's a "fun" job, NOT!!

Is it safe to say that OEM plugs can last 200k or more?

Trying to drag them on as much as possible
You probably could, the plugs tend to slowly degrade rather than just die suddenly, however just think of the consequence if any part of an old plug facing into the combustion chamber breaks off and starts bouncing around in the combustion chamber.......
 

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Well done OP, excellent image quality, I'm good with my pro DSLR but could not muster the patience to take pix when I changed plugs last fall.

Just wait until you decide to do valve clearance check/adjustment, that's a "fun" job, NOT!!
Thanks for the kind words guys, just trying to help anyone out who might be on the fence about doing it themselves. But yes, in a way I am and I am not looking forward to the valve adjustment haha. In another 2 or 3 weeks I will have the parts and supplies to do a 3x drain and refill, replacing the factory transmission filter, replace the 3rd and 4th gear pressure switches, and add in a B&M 70268 SuperCooler to further prolong the life of my transmission. I will be sure to document all of that thoroughly for the DIY section like I did for the plugs.

And I agree that Honda has a nice plug change interval. Yes you can go a little longer like I did, but I will change these in 100k miles and keep that interval from here on out. Not worth risking when you can pay $60 for plugs vs. thousands potentially if a plug fails and breaks.
 

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EDIT/UPDATE: According to DENSO and NGK, there is no such thing as blow-by or gasses leaking by between the porcelain and metal part of the plug, which is a common misconception. Here are the links:

http://www.globaldenso.com/en/produc...ing/index.html

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/dyk_5points.pdf

The brown on the porcelain part of the plugs is called "corona soiling" and is the result of electrical stress in the air near the insulator. Which this brings into question: Is the corona soiling the reason for the brownish coloring on the ends of the coil packs or something else possibly related to the plug almost being ejected? I'm thinking corona soiling, but would love to hear other opinions. I personally believe (knock on wood) that I have a healthy V6, but of course I want to do everything to further prolong its life.
 

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Very late join here.

If I just "inspect" the plugs do I need to replace the crush washer?

Gap: 0.044" (?)

Just going back through the receipts and it looks like the plugs were changed 121,000 km ago.
 
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