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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone own a 2015 hybrid? What kind of gas mileage are you getting and how's the ride and handling? I own a Prius C and noticed the mpg rating for the Accord Hybrid is very close to the Prius. Considering getting an Accord Hybrid in a few years, after retirement for trips.
 

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I've had a EX-L Accord hybrid for a little over a month. My last tank I went 715 miles, with 39 miles left on the range. The computer said 46.6 and I computed 47.44 based on the mileage and how much fuel I put back in. I'm getting 40-45 typically on the highway doing 72, and over 50 consistently in the city. I'm pleased with it thus far.

Some say the ride is harsh; that's subjective. It is rougher than I would've expected, but I don't think it's rough. It handles well, but I am not a fan of how twitchy it is on the highway. The steering is very tight/responsive, so if I attempt to correct a little bit, I end up getting a much larger movement than I'd like. I think it will take some getting used to.

That's my .02
 

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I only have my Hybrid EX-L for 10 days. My commute is mostly suburban back roads with small hills. It's about 30 miles round trip.

I am getting consistently around 50 and 60 mpg depending on which way. That's from the trip computer and since I still have my first tank of gas from the dealer, I don't know how accurate it is.

The ride is OK. But I came from a compact SUV with firm suspensions so I can't compare it to other sedans.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just a heads up. When shopping for my wife's Accord, Toyota and Honda both said that in both the Camry and Accord, the LE and XLE (Toyota) and the LE and Touring (Honda) have a better ride than the rest of the models because they have same suspension specs.
 

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Wow I'm amazed by the fuel economy mentioned here. Are you guys happy with the dual-screen infotainment system and the smallish trunk?
The trunk size sux. There's no way around it. But I still have my SUV (2 actually) so it's not a big problem for me.

The infotainment system is not unique to hybrid and does its job. But as an engineer I have to say it's badly designed. The information repeats itself across the 3 displays a lot with no rhythm or reason. The larger main display is obviously design for NAV in mind and is a huge waste of available screen space for anything else. Like when playing a song, the title will often be truncated while it can easily use all the unused space to show it in multiple lines.

The touch screen is under utilized and badly integrated. You still need to roll the knob and press physical buttons while looking up to the main display for a lot of operations.

But it's OK. I bought a car, not a smartphone. :)
 

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I am getting around 44mpg for a combination of 70+ mph highway and around town. Best mpg is on two lane highways / back roads going 45-55 mph. If I was only driving 70+mph highways I would not get the hybrid. It's only about 15% better than the 4 cylinder.

All in all, I love the powertrain. It is a very quick hybrid and gets 40+ mpg without too much trying.
 

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I have had my Hybrid EX-L for about 2.5 months and already closing in on 6000 miles. I have been keeping track of mileage and fuel consumption, and so far I have been impressed.

Overall, I have gotten around 48.8 MPG. Some tanks have been over 50 MPG, worst has been 44.3 MPG. The range on one tank has been 720-800 miles for the last six tanks.

That said, there are a lot of factors that go into that MPG number. Weather (springtime in Minnesota), road conditions (for the most part my commute is fairly flat), traffic (my trips have been about 60% highway, 30% city, 10% freeway), air temperature (only turned on A/C about four times), number of passengers (mostly single-passenger commuting), and driving behavior (driving like an a**hole will lower MPG, the blue lights will let you know this), etc etc etc.

Trunk size is small and no rear folding seats, but I knew that going in. It is big enough for groceries and most luggage, and I have not had an occasion yet where I needed more space.

Infotainment system is functional, but unimpressive. Lots of duplicated information on 3 different screens. It works, but isnt/shouldnt be the main selling feature of this car.

Coming from driving a Toyota 4Runner V8 Limited for the past 9 years (which I loved driving, by the way) I can say that it has been fun driving this Hybrid.... especially the part about not having to worry about gas prices.
 

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The biggest factor I see on the MPG seems to be a tie between climate control and driving style. The HAH makes it pretty easy to drive more efficiently, if you select the correct display in the center of the speedo. The ECON button dials down the climate control load and improves MPG too.

I don't use ECON because it's blooming hot here in Texas, and I try to stay in the green on my driving style. That being said, my full tank MPG runs generally in the 44-45 range with a daily 17 mile commute of 10 miles highway and 7 mile local roads. I've seem as low as 38 (ice and snow, difficult travel with lots of delays) and as high as 47 (normal commute but driving more efficiently). If I committed to the local roads all the way, I would probably see about 50-55 MPG on a tank.

The entertainment control set-up needs revamped, but is usable, if inefficient. The trunk is smaller than a non-hybrid, but the difference isn't as much as you might think. The lack of any pass-thru is a factor to consider.

I love it, 6500 miles.
 

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The trunk size sux. There's no way around it. But I still have my SUV (2 actually) so it's not a big problem for me.

The infotainment system is not unique to hybrid and does its job. But as an engineer I have to say it's badly designed. The information repeats itself across the 3 displays a lot with no rhythm or reason. The larger main display is obviously design for NAV in mind and is a huge waste of available screen space for anything else. Like when playing a song, the title will often be truncated while it can easily use all the unused space to show it in multiple lines.

The touch screen is under utilized and badly integrated. You still need to roll the knob and press physical buttons while looking up to the main display for a lot of operations.

But it's OK. I bought a car, not a smartphone. :)
Its funny you'd mention the infotainment system..
I was in a focus group for just that, given a few different styles of basically the same set of info on a couple screens....I rated them made a few remarks kinda like yours. And then...They gave me a check and showed me out. No group discussion for me.

I was hoping that each 'skin' would present different info in different ways...but nope...Just different styles and color themes...
eh.. $150 though!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
For a sedan hybrid the top mpg are; Accord 47mpg
Fusion 42mpg
Camry 41mpg
Sonata 38mpg
Optima 38mpg

I don't know about how the prices and features line up, but the Accord definitely gets the best gas mileage.

Anyone?

It seems the biggest disappointment is the infotainment center. I'm hoping by the time I will be ready for one, they will have that ironed out.

Lee
 

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Does anyone own a 2015 hybrid? What kind of gas mileage are you getting and how's the ride and handling? I own a Prius C and noticed the mpg rating for the Accord Hybrid is very close to the Prius. Considering getting an Accord Hybrid in a few years, after retirement for trips.
Hybrids make more sense for city driving. For trips you can get really close to the same MPG as a Hybrid with a conventional Accord 4 cyl. And you get the bigger trunk, which I would think would come in handy for traveling.

Bottom line is that for highway driving, the difference in fuel economy between the two narrows so much that you can't justify the price premium you'll pay for the hybrid. The break-even point will stretch out to over 10 years. For city driving the fuel economy difference is substantial and you'll hit the break even point much quicker.
 

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Just a heads up. When shopping for my wife's Accord, Toyota and Honda both said that in both the Camry and Accord, the LE and XLE (Toyota) and the LE and Touring (Honda) have a better ride than the rest of the models because they have same suspension specs.
I'm not sure what they told you was accurate, at least for the Hondas. (can't speak for the Toyota). All 3 trim levels of the Accord Hybrid have the exact same suspension setup, and all 3 weigh essentially the same (the lightest, the base hybrid is 3550 lbs, the heaviest Touring is 3602 lbs), for a 1.4% difference. It's not going to be noticeable. Slight variations in tire pressure would make way more of a difference in ride comfort than the inherent difference between the trims.

Hybrids make more sense for city driving. For trips you can get really close to the same MPG as a Hybrid with a conventional Accord 4 cyl. And you get the bigger trunk, which I would think would come in handy for traveling.

Bottom line is that for highway driving, the difference in fuel economy between the two narrows so much that you can't justify the price premium you'll pay for the hybrid. The break-even point will stretch out to over 10 years. For city driving the fuel economy difference is substantial and you'll hit the break even point much quicker.
Maybe. If one is deciding between the two purely on cheapest fuel costs, while the math varies, the payoff can be a few years out there. Simple spreadsheet attached, people can play with the inputs however they choose. At $3.50 gallon, 15,000 miles per year, and $4000 difference between hybrid & non-hybrid, here's what break-even looks like: (6.9 years at the combined avg)



Looking at older Camry hybrids, they appear to be holding value better than the non-hybrid Camrys of the same year, hinting that the effective cost difference may be lower. If you adjust that $4000 purchase price difference based on better resale value, the break-even point moves much closer. Too early to tell whether the same will hold true for the recent Accord Hybrids, but it does start to counter the fear that limited battery life destroys the resale value of these cars.

For me, it's useful to think about real-world driving experience and fuel-economy expectations as well, though. I hated that I had to baby a prior car, just so it would touch 20 mpg, and if I drove more aggressively, it would dip into the teens. It made driving the car not particularly fun (14 gallon tank with 17 mpg, and you're filling up every few days if you don't want to run to empty each time). With our Hybrid, I can drive it exactly how I'd want, accelerating as quickly as I feel the need, driving at fast highway speeds, and no matter how much I beat on it, still see right around 40 mpg. That's with AC on Auto at 68 degrees year round, ECON setting off, all the time. Driving on eggshells and turning my AC off, hyper-miling at 62.8 mph in order to see 50+ mpg doesn't appeal to me, as the effective difference in costs from 40 mpg - 50 mpg is almost negligible.

I find the range on the car between fillups to be a great plus. It just feels like such a luxury to have 600+ mile range without a care in the world, and an easy 700+ mile range if you're even the slightest bit careful. I find the driving experience with the electric drivetrain to be a big step up from the standard Accords for a few reasons, but the two big ones are silence when stopped (no sound, no vibration, no anything); and the smoothness of the throttle response. Push pedal this much, car returns this much torque, instantly. No waiting for a transmission to kick down, no waiting for a CVT to adjust while trying to put down the power, the electric motor responds instantly and perfectly linearly. At highway speeds, even when the IC engine is running most of the time, the car has the same response as a manual transmission, as its geared straight to the wheels with no torque converter or any other component to dilute the response. Press down x hard, and car accelerates with y force. It truly feels like a step forward compared to conventional powertrains, with the inherent and obvious advantage of getting much better fuel economy at the same time.

Honda has big plans for this drivetrain, and I'm looking forward to where it will land in the next few years (mid-size SUV, Acura sedans, etc.). Thinking only back to the mid-90's, and imagining what it would take to have a 50-mpg car, and I don't think people thought it would be anything like this so soon. Just look at the first-gen Honda Insight (slow, loud, unsafe, decontented), which this new Accord rivals in fuel economy, and it's painfully obvious how far the tech has come in such a relatively short time.

Worth a test drive; see what you think.
 

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For a sedan hybrid the top mpg are; Accord 47mpg
Fusion 42mpg
Camry 41mpg
Sonata 38mpg
Optima 38mpg

I don't know about how the prices and features line up, but the Accord definitely gets the best gas mileage.

Anyone?

It seems the biggest disappointment is the infotainment center. I'm hoping by the time I will be ready for one, they will have that ironed out.

Lee
I've driven Prius' for about 6 six years now. I have a 2011 Prius and have gotten 52 lifetime, so I know how to work these things.
Anyhow ,,,,,

I've rented a 2015 Camry Hybrid SE, the new 'bold and bolder' model twice now, but I won't be renting it again.
I am convinced the Camry Hybrid can get some exceptional fuel economy. I estimate I could easily get 42, maybe 43 lifetime MPGs on one, BUT .....

I will not, in any way, be buying a 2015 Camry. I'm 6'2" tall and pretty darn picky about seats and DO NOT like Camry's rather small driver's seat. The armrests and where they send my hands on steering wheel do not work out. Nuff said.

I won't be getting my hands on an Accord Hybrid, but I spent 2 days and $150 bucks renting an very nice 2014 Accord EX-L 4 cylinder non-hybrid sedan and in my experience the Accords ride quality, road feel, interior quietness, steering feel and driver's seat comfort were 'head and shoulders' above the Camry Hybrid.

.... and I'm not just saying that to blow sunshine up somebody's you know what. I really mean it because I got out and road tested both models.
btw, the Accord EX conventional scored 33.4 MPG at the pump over 285 miles and the mpg gage was VERY accurate from my calcs.
 

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Great post. And your spreadsheet helps explain my point. If the OP is buying this car to take long trips, conventional makes more sense than hybrid. If this thing is mostly used for highway trips, the break even point climbs to 13+ years.

Primary use of highway driving (i.e. trips), I get a cheaper car with a larger trunk and a less complicated drive train (less can go wrong).

Primary use of city driving, the fantastic MPG dominates the equation and hybrid would be the way to go.
 

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Great post. And your spreadsheet helps explain my point. If the OP is buying this car to take long trips, conventional makes more sense than hybrid. If this thing is mostly used for highway trips, the break even point climbs to 13+ years.
Maybe, but I think people overestimate the usefulness of calcs like these when deciding to buy a car. Many people choose the Sport over the LX, the manual over the CVT, and the V6 over the I4, even though every one of those individual choices will cost more in fuel compared to the first option. The break-even point for all of these is never. Everyone who makes those choices isn't "wrong", they just had a preference that the 2nd option was a more attractive choice, and worth any extra money they would be spending either up front or over the long-term. The choice to buy a hybrid, even this hybrid, is not only about that break-even number for many people.

Primary use of highway driving (i.e. trips), I get a cheaper car with a larger trunk and a less complicated drive train (less can go wrong).
I wouldn't equate new and different to more complicated. Those are two different concepts. An electric motor is quite simple, and proven technology. An electronically controlled clutch is a very simple mechanical device. Those two pieces plus an ECU to control it make up the hybrid drivetrain. As a comparison, the CVT in the standard accord is a much more mechanically complicated, and has just as short-lived reliability stats to infer any long-term reliability estimates. To be fair, they are making a ton more CVTs than hybrids, so within a few years it will be easier to see how it turned out for the average owner.
 

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Maybe, but I think people overestimate the usefulness of calcs like these when deciding to buy a car. Many people choose the Sport over the LX, the manual over the CVT, and the V6 over the I4, even though every one of those individual choices will cost more in fuel compared to the first option. The break-even point for all of these is never. Everyone who makes those choices isn't "wrong", they just had a preference that the 2nd option was a more attractive choice, and worth any extra money they would be spending either up front or over the long-term. The choice to buy a hybrid, even this hybrid, is not only about that break-even number for many people.



I wouldn't equate new and different to more complicated. Those are two different concepts. An electric motor is quite simple, and proven technology. An electronically controlled clutch is a very simple mechanical device. Those two pieces plus an ECU to control it make up the hybrid drivetrain. As a comparison, the CVT in the standard accord is a much more mechanically complicated, and has just as short-lived reliability stats to infer any long-term reliability estimates. To be fair, they are making a ton more CVTs than hybrids, so within a few years it will be easier to see how it turned out for the average owner.

Good points. To me, engine + CVT transmission is less complex than engine + motor + battery + transmission. And yes, I know I have oversimplified this. I did the same analysis 6 years ago when I was compared a Fit to a Civic Hybrid (yes, different cars so comparison breaks down a bit). I chose the Fit for the same reasons: simpler drive train and the fuel efficiency difference wasn't significant enough to justify the increased cost. For me. I know the Civic hybrid makes perfect sense for others.

Which gets me to my point that I'm certainly not saying anyone is right or wrong about this. As you point out, there are many factors at play on why any particular individual values one feature/specification over an other. I get bugged by posts that say "this worked for me so this is obviously right for you".
 

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Plus as was pointed out earlier comparing cars to equal zero isn't right either. If sold I'm confident the hybrid would sell for a few grand more.

If the difference ulitmatly is a few grand difference I think the coolness is worth it. Shoot people put new rims on there car to be cool. This is just a different cool. The hybrid really is a neat idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Isaccth1, thanks for the input. My wife said the same thing after driving a Camry then the Accord. Accord hands down. She gave up the power seat, that the Camry LE offered, for the individual climate control the Accord LE had that the Camry did not!
 
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