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Guys, I have a question I am sort of new to the 8th gen. My previous 7th gen accord had a dealer add on alarm which worked in conjunction with my factory alarm system so I could arm it with my honda key in conjunction. I would like to know does the 8th gen require an additional alarm system or does the honda system appear to be effective enough? I know you can never have to much protection but I don't know in what order it should be on my upgrade list? Which alarm works with the honda key so I dont have to carry around a clunky second remote? I did some searching on the forum and found that everyone who commented on the viper/python/clifford selected the viper most commonly the 5901 and with more funds on hand 5902. Comments, Suggestions, Questions?
 

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Guys, I have a question I am sort of new to the 8th gen. My previous 7th gen accord had a dealer add on alarm which worked in conjunction with my factory alarm system so I could arm it with my honda key in conjunction. I would like to know does the 8th gen require an additional alarm system or does the honda system appear to be effective enough? I know you can never have to much protection but I don't know in what order it should be on my upgrade list? Which alarm works with the honda key so I dont have to carry around a clunky second remote? I did some searching on the forum and found that everyone who commented on the viper/python/clifford selected the viper most commonly the 5901 and with more funds on hand 5902. Comments, Suggestions, Questions?
Viper=overrated
 

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Viper=overrated
As a former installer with 8 years experience, I HIGHLY AGREE WITH THAT STATEMENT.

In my opinion, the factory system covers the basics as well as any aftermarket system out there, with no false alarms unless there's a defect. The factory system lacks a shock sensor which is a good thing in my opinion. In fact, during the last half of my installing career, I stopped installing them unless the customer absolutely insisted. If they had to have one, they had to sign a document stating that false alarms will occur as a result of their choice.

Shock sensors and glass break detectors can trigger the system if the glass is broken but they are not worth the hassle and they don't stop someone from breaking the glass.

In my opinion, the best thing you can do to increase actual and perceived security is add a well-placed fuel kill switch. The factory immobilizer is very excellent but someone with access to a crooked dealer could drive it away. A fuel kill will minimize that risk. Don't leave valuable visible and there will be very little temptation for someone to break in.

Lastly, ignore those who say alarms are worthless. They are not worthless. Everyone else may ignore it, but if YOU hear it, then it has done its job. A thief will always take the path of least resistance and prefers an unlocked, unalarmed car. Also, ignore those who say "if they want it, they'll get it". You don't secure your vehicle against the .01% who are pro thieves--you secure it against the other 99.99% who are opportunist punks.

Bottom line--purchase a QUALITY switch and pay to have it stealthily installed. I would NOT put an alarm on top of an alarm though. However, if you must, don't go with the over-priced Viper.
 

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As a former installer with 8 years experience, I HIGHLY AGREE WITH THAT STATEMENT.
Good post, thanks for your professional opinion. The fuel kill switch is an awesome idea, what could you expect a reasonable installer to charge for something like that?

Thanks again.
 

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The fuel kill switch is an awesome idea, what could you expect a reasonable installer to charge for something like that?

Thanks again.
It really depends. You will have to shop around. Figure out where you want your switch and ask how much it would cost to install in that location with the wires NEATLY ROUTED. Don't let them choose the location because they'll do what's easiest for them instead of what's best for you. You have to live with the switch location, not them. In no case should it be installed on the driver's kick panel. Make sure your switch can handle a constant 10-20 amps. If not, make sure a relay is used in conjunction with the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much. Really good information. I appreciate it. I will not upgrade then and look into a fuel kill switch.
 

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As a former installer with 8 years experience, I HIGHLY AGREE WITH THAT STATEMENT.

In my opinion, the factory system covers the basics as well as any aftermarket system out there, with no false alarms unless there's a defect. The factory system lacks a shock sensor which is a good thing in my opinion. In fact, during the last half of my installing career, I stopped installing them unless the customer absolutely insisted. If they had to have one, they had to sign a document stating that false alarms will occur as a result of their choice.

Shock sensors and glass break detectors can trigger the system if the glass is broken but they are not worth the hassle and they don't stop someone from breaking the glass.

In my opinion, the best thing you can do to increase actual and perceived security is add a well-placed fuel kill switch. The factory immobilizer is very excellent but someone with access to a crooked dealer could drive it away. A fuel kill will minimize that risk. Don't leave valuable visible and there will be very little temptation for someone to break in.

Lastly, ignore those who say alarms are worthless. They are not worthless. Everyone else may ignore it, but if YOU hear it, then it has done its job. A thief will always take the path of least resistance and prefers an unlocked, unalarmed car. Also, ignore those who say "if they want it, they'll get it". You don't secure your vehicle against the .01% who are pro thieves--you secure it against the other 99.99% who are opportunist punks.

Bottom line--purchase a QUALITY switch and pay to have it stealthily installed. I would NOT put an alarm on top of an alarm though. However, if you must, don't go with the over-priced Viper.
Most new alarms have the ability to Ignore zones such as a shock sensor that constantly set the alarm off I think 3 falses is the magic number for DEI products. I think two way alarms are a great investment, not only do you know the status of your vehicle at all times but its an extra layer of protection that the factory alarm cant even come close to providing esp when it comes to range of the alarm. A good installer can always adjust a shock sensor to the owners specs. I have not come across a single (modern) shock sensor that was not adjustable.
I rather have a glass break sensor/shock sensor that would trigger the alarm than the factory alarm that would do nothing until a door was opened while being armed...

You arent putting alarm on top of alarm... can wire the factory alarm to work in conjunction with the aftermarket one through the factory disarm/arm wires, when aftermarket goes off factory goes off, when aftermarket disarms factory disarms..
 

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Most new alarms have the ability to Ignore zones such as a shock sensor that constantly set the alarm off I think 3 falses is the magic number for DEI products. I think two way alarms are a great investment, not only do you know the status of your vehicle at all times but its an extra layer of protection that the factory alarm cant even come close to providing esp when it comes to range of the alarm. A good installer can always adjust a shock sensor to the owners specs. I have not come across a single (modern) shock sensor that was not adjustable.
I rather have a glass break sensor/shock sensor that would trigger the alarm than the factory alarm that would do nothing until a door was opened while being armed...

You arent putting alarm on top of alarm... can wire the factory alarm to work in conjunction with the aftermarket one through the factory disarm/arm wires, when aftermarket goes off factory goes off, when aftermarket disarms factory disarms..
A few comments:

- True...a two-way alarm can provide feedback on your car's status but remote range has absolutely NOTHING to do with
vehicle security. I've installed paging and two-way alarms. They're great at alerting you to false alarms caused by shock
sensors. LOL. One customer was arrested and sued for "assaulting" the kid whose baseball had hit his car and went
underneath it. The owner got an alert from his two-way alarm, ran down 4 flights of stairs, saw some kid under his car
and started stomping the kid's legs, feet, and breaking an ankle. He pulled the kid from underneath and...well the whole s
scenario ****ed. Poor kid was just trying to get his ball. But hey...the two-way alarm and shock sensor worked.

- Shock sensors and glass break detectors, when set properly, will still false. A car parked in a noisy area will sound its
alarm all day. Let a Harley or Dump Truck roll by and see what happens. Leave it parked at an airport and guess what? If
you don't disable the sensor, your car will false all the whole time...no matter how well-adjusted it is. These sensors are
actually why so many people ignore alarms. You refer to alarms ignoring sensors after 3 falses. What does that tell you
about the vulnerability of sensors to falsing? Sorry but why add a feature that causes the system to hit the snooze
button on its own sensor?

- If one must have sensors I would go with ultrasonics (not microwave), which CANNOT be set off by outside noises or
interference. Microwave is vulnerable to rouge RF signals. But ultrasonics are hard to find in the U.S.

- There's are reason no car made today--not even highly secure German vehicles--comes with a shock sensor factory-
installed...dealers would be inundated with false alarm claims.
 

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I see a couple of knowledgeable vehicle security people on here, so I'm going to ask this and see if anyone can help:

If you remember the old Chapman security systems, from the 1970s and 80s, I'd like to get the air horn from that alarm and work it in conjunction with my factory car horn when the alarm goes off, if that's possible.

For those who do not know what I'm talking about, in the days before aftermarket alarm systems had computer circuits with plastic sirens and multiple siren sequences, alarms (most popularly made by a company called Chapman, who was bought out by Code Alarm in the early 1990s at the dawn of computerized alarms with remote controls) were mechanical switches that engaged a kill switch and an air horn, which was mainly a metal horn with a 12 volt motor and finned blade inside. When the alarm went off it sounded EXACTLY like an air raid or tornado warning siren.

I would like to find this siren and put it on my car in conjunction with the factory horn. I think it would scare the pants of anyone messing with my car! Because it would sound like NOTHING - NOTHING - out there. Few cars remain with the old Chapman alarm, and fewer yet remain with the alarm still functional (the sirens tended to get rusty and sieze up if mounted where elements get to it easily).
 

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I see a couple of knowledgeable vehicle security people on here, so I'm going to ask this and see if anyone can help:

If you remember the old Chapman security systems, from the 1970s and 80s, I'd like to get the air horn from that alarm and work it in conjunction with my factory car horn .....
I've heard this request a few times. I'm confident it could work with the help of a relay or two. All I can recommend is check ebay. Sorry.
 

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A few comments:

- True...a two-way alarm can provide feedback on your car's status but remote range has absolutely NOTHING to do with
vehicle security. I've installed paging and two-way alarms. They're great at alerting you to false alarms caused by shock
sensors. LOL. One customer was arrested and sued for "assaulting" the kid whose baseball had hit his car and went
underneath it. The owner got an alert from his two-way alarm, ran down 4 flights of stairs, saw some kid under his car
and started stomping the kid's legs, feet, and breaking an ankle. He pulled the kid from underneath and...well the whole s
scenario ****ed. Poor kid was just trying to get his ball. But hey...the two-way alarm and shock sensor worked.

- Shock sensors and glass break detectors, when set properly, will still false. A car parked in a noisy area will sound its
alarm all day. Let a Harley or Dump Truck roll by and see what happens. Leave it parked at an airport and guess what? If
you don't disable the sensor, your car will false all the whole time...no matter how well-adjusted it is. These sensors are
actually why so many people ignore alarms. You refer to alarms ignoring sensors after 3 falses. What does that tell you
about the vulnerability of sensors to falsing? Sorry but why add a feature that causes the system to hit the snooze
button on its own sensor?

- If one must have sensors I would go with ultrasonics (not microwave), which CANNOT be set off by outside noises or
interference. Microwave is vulnerable to rouge RF signals. But ultrasonics are hard to find in the U.S.

- There's are reason no car made today--not even highly secure German vehicles--comes with a shock sensor factory-
installed...dealers would be inundated with false alarm claims.
If the alarm falses then it is the job of the installer to dial back the shock sensor. It is an affective tool when it does its job. You mentioned that 2 way alarms do nothing for security but if that kid with the baseball had more malicious intentions then it could have ended differently if the owner contacted the authorities as soon as his pager went off I think in that aspect it does a lot of security.....I have a DEI product installed and have installed them on the side and I cant get it to false at all,(I place them all in the same place in the center of the car and not to a wire loom) even on it most sensitive setting, so your statement "your car will false all the whole time...no matter how well-adjusted it is." is not true, DEi sensors are known for not being sensitive enough.

Now if your talking about the DEI 508D, the fiend disturbance sensor then yes I will admit they do false ONLY because installers can have a tough time setting up the 2 fields inside of each other.

BTW subaru does sell OEM shock sensors for their vehicles in the US they are offered on the newer (2006-2010)gen outback and legacys....and they are not aftermarket ones. And The honda OEM add on alarm for the 7th gen accord comes with a glass break sensor for the LX's
 

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great info here. I just want a good remote starter system but when looking at the price it was just better to get the viper system install as I needed one that will work with the defrost in the back window. And for the price it was only 25 more to get it all installed.
 
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