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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last week I was working in Miami and rented a Chevy Cruze. Several members bemoaned not having a folding key fob. The Cruze comes with one of those.

It's the kind where the key that goes in the ignition switch folds back into the fob after pushing a little button on the key fob. What a pain in the rear that is to use compared to the push button smart start or even having a non folding solid key and fob combination.

If you have anything in your other hand you can't easily push the button and fold the key away. Instead you lock the doors with the fob buttons and stick the unfolded key in your pocket just like the one on the non smart start Accords. I assume that this key and fob combination is standard on luxury vehicles where the owner's never have to carry anything from the car since they have a butler to perform that function and they can easily fold the key away into the fob. :notworthy

I wonder how many years it takes for the spring and key release button to fail and you have basically the same system as on the Accord or worse the key part doesn't remain locked in or out.

The Cruze also had a touch screen audio system which displayed even less of the text of a song than the system on the Accord. It always set the volume very low when you turned the system on. Each time I had to increase the volume on the radio. BTW the FM sounded no better than on the Accord. The audio system did pair with my cheap phone easily, but I never called anyone or received a call in the car all week.

I'm glad my Accord doesn't have any of those features.
 

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Four Doors/Two Pedals
2020 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T 10AT
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The Honda "keyless" fob, or whatever it's called, is plenty adequate and I have no complaint with it at all.

I did notice this on the Mercedes site:

KEYLESS-GO®

A leap in ease and efficiency pioneered by Mercedes-Benz, KEYLESS-GO® lets you unlock, start and drive away without removing the SmartKey from your pocket or purse. You can lock and unlock the doors with a touch of the exterior handles, and start the engine by stepping on the brake pedal and pushing the Start/Stop button on the dashboard. You can also start the vehicle in the conventional way by removing the Start/Stop button and inserting the SmartKey into the ignition.

http://www.mbusa.com/mercedes/vehicles/build/class-C/model-C250WZ#entertainment

I'm not sure if that's an advantage or not.

KEYLESS-GO® is a $650 option by the way.
 

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If you have anything in your other hand you can't easily push the button and fold the key away. Instead you lock the doors with the fob buttons and stick the unfolded key in your pocket just like the one on the non smart start Accords. I assume that this key and fob combination is standard on luxury vehicles where the owner's never have to carry anything from the car since they have a butler to perform that function and they can easily fold the key away into the fob. :notworthy

I wonder how many years it takes for the spring and key release button to fail
I can appreciate that you might prefer a push button start system but I think your criticism of folding keys is invalid. I certainly don't have a butler and have none of the problems you suggest. When you take the key out of the ignition you fold it! You shouldn't have anything in your hands at that point.

I'm sure it's variable as to how long they last. In my case, I upgraded to a TL folding key 1-2007 and it's still working perfectly.

I've always thought that push button start (the kind where you also use a key) was pretty useless. It seems just as easy to me to put a key in the ignition and turn it versus putting a key in the ignition and pushing a button.
 

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The only issue ive had with my fob is putting it in my pocket and having it press up against something like a lighter or other keys. Come out of the house and find the windows rolled down or the trunk opened. Its more of a fob (user) issue and not honda specific but its funny so i thought id share.
 

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I remember when those "switchblade" keys were all the rage haha. I had one with my 2000 Passat and thought it was great the first 15 minutes but then the novelty of it quickly wore off. It was a slick little piece and it was nice to have one less pointy metallic object in my pants pocket, but in the end it wasn't something that I absolutely had to have from then on. To me, the biggest advancement before smart key access was having the remote transmitter integrated into the key itself. One less item on the key ring and a clever way to save space. It's funny to me that the Accord had a remote transmitter built into the key way back on the '91 wagon, but the feature wasn't available on all Accords until 2003. The 91's keyless entry was quite archaic though, using IR sensors on the driver's door and tailgate. Keyless entry was a rare sight back in the early '90s and it used to draw a lot of attention in mall parking lots when my dad would unlock his wagon without putting his key in the door. Now, the Accord is available with fully keyless entry and push-button start. If my dad could suddenly come back to life today (he died in '91), he'd probably fall over dead again after seeing how far technology has come in the last 23 years haha. I'll never forget when he told my grandfather that a 386DX and an 80MB hard drive were more than he'd ever need in a PC hahaha. If only he knew...
 

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I wish my key would fold into itself, just because it's so much longer than all of my other keys. It's not a very big deal, but my key ring got a lot bulkier when I added it, so I'd take the switchblade if I had the option.
 

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A folding key keeps less hardware exposed in the pocket. Ever have a key poke a hole in your nice Brooks Brother's suit pants?

Keys are so 100 years ago but if I must have one, I'll take a folding any day especially with today's bulky long keys. My 07 MDX folder is a bit loose but works well, as intended.

Unless it's a classic, I will not own another car with a key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A folding key keeps less hardware exposed in the pocket. Ever have a key poke a hole in your nice Brooks Brother's suit pants?

Keys are so 100 years ago but if I must have one, I'll take a folding any day especially with today's bulky long keys. My 07 MDX folder is a bit loose but works well, as intended.

Unless it's a classic, I will not own another car with a key.
I have never had the key of my 2000 Accord Coupe ever poke a hole in my pocket and I drove the car nearly 14 years. Of course I don't own any pants from Brooks Brothers but for the price they get the pockets should be reinforced.

I have rented VWs in Europe and now this Cruez in Miami and I found the folding key a pain to use. Of course the VW and the Cruez were both smaller and cheaper cars than the Accord. I just remembered folks on this forum trying to convert their LX or Sport keys to the folding variety and after using that style key fob for a week I couldn't figure out what people liked about them.
 

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I have rented VWs in Europe and now this Cruez in Miami and I found the folding key a pain to use.
Have you noticed that so far you seem to be the only person that thinks a folding key is a pain to use? Perhaps more folks will chime in and agree with you - but I kind of doubt it. As I previously noted, your issue related to "anything in your other hand" is really a matter of what could be called operator error. If moving your thumb an inch to push the button is a pain for you then so be it! Maybe you just never got used to one. After a little use it becomes sort of automatic.
 

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I have never had the key of my 2000 Accord Coupe ever poke a hole in my pocket and I drove the car nearly 14 years. Of course I don't own any pants from Brooks Brothers but for the price they get the pockets should be reinforced.

I have rented VWs in Europe and now this Cruez in Miami and I found the folding key a pain to use. Of course the VW and the Cruez were both smaller and cheaper cars than the Accord. I just remembered folks on this forum trying to convert their LX or Sport keys to the folding variety and after using that style key fob for a week I couldn't figure out what people liked about them.
A big long key extending out further than any other key in the pocket can't be a good thing. How can that be desireable? I find that far more of a problem than hitting a button to flip out a key.

Its akin to stuffing a wallet in your pants pocket without folding it. Wallets used to be called a "billfold" for a reason. It's to take up less space in your pocket, not to frustrate you.

I never hear anyone complain about what a PITA it is because they have to "unfold their wallet" to get to their money.

Ever recycle your trash? Crush the box first so it doesn't take up so much space in the bin. Same principal with a folding key.
 

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I too put a few hundred KMs on a Cruze last week.It had much less road noise and the audio system sound much better than my 13 Sport CVT.
 

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I too put a few hundred KMs on a Cruze last week.It had much less road noise and the audio system sound much better than my 13 Sport CVT.
That Cruze is a nice car, I like the Diesel.
 

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Non folding keys are a literal pain. My partner's Fusion key doesn't fold, we both hate carrying the thing.

My roommate sold his Focus last year and now has a Cruze with the folding key. It doesn't have a backup camera or heated seats (it's a mid-level LT1). I don't fit personally, the car is too skinny and feels closed in to me. I've only ridden in it on a short jaunt, so I don't know much else about them.

And so far as the MB allowing the start button to be removed and the conventional key used, I WISH the Accord would have this option. It would've saved me 2 hours waiting in a DC garage for my roommate to bring my spare key when the [email protected]$$ valet lost my fob!
 

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My two prior cars both had those folding flip keys, and I personally loved them. In the 6+ years with both I never had any "wearing" out problems or anything of the kind. I was frankly a little shell shocked when I had to adjust to having this normal key thing in my pocket.

I have been so tempted to have an Acura dealer make me one of theirs for my Accord, but I just cannot justify the $150 they quoted me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The bottom line is having the smart key is the best choice because it's the size of the folding key fob and you never have to remove it from your pocket. My second choice would be a key with the fob attached because the fob and the key stay together without having to fool around with a button and the spring loaded folding key. Among this group of Accord owners the folding key fob wins.

I guess there are not many fans of the standard Honda key.
 

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There is one thing that makes the smart key advantageous for me and that is that I can never again turn the ignition while the engine is running.

I know most probably never have this problem and it hasn't been a major issue with me, but now that engines run as smoothly and as quietly as they do, it has happened and it irritates me to no end.

As for the other issues, I never really had any problem carrying any car key around and I can't remember wearing out any pockets doing so.

I never had a folding key, so I don't know if it's an issue, but I can hardly imagine that it would be a major pain to adjust to having one.

Also, with the smart key, I can no longer lock my keys in the car, which over the last 50 years has happened far more than I'd like to admit.

And another thing, my keys go in my right pocket and everything else goes in my left pocket.

It helps to keep from scratching the phone screen and dropping coins all over the place.
 

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Every European car I have owned (including my '72 Capri) had a mechanical lock out in the ignition switch that would not allow you to grind the starter with the engine running. American and Japanese makes even today don't have a clue.

I am a huge fan of keyless start and won't own another car without it (said the same thing in 2004 about window curtain airbags) but people (Camry drivers) better be well versed by reading the manual on how to shut the engine down in an emergency.

In '65 my dad had a '63 Imperial that had a throttle stick with all of us in the car. While braking, and fighting the acceleration, he simply clicked the key to the off position and brought it to a controlled stop. Traffic conditions would not allow less drastic measures.

Edit: Unintended acceleration should be dealt with by lifting your foot off the gas, braking (left foot if needed to be certain you are not pushing on the gas), going to neutral, using the emergency brake in nearly simultaneous fashion and if all fails hold the ignition button for 3 seconds to shut down. My point below deals with just shutting the car off, not as a safety guide for unintended acceleration: see subsequent post on that.


How does one "turn the key off" in an emergency while a push button start car is in drive going down the road? Pushing the button won't shut it off as Camry drivers found out. One must PUSH AND HOLD the button for 2-3 seconds to shut down the engine in an emergency. A quick flick like you do in the garage while in park won't do it. That makes sense, you don't want an accidental bump of the button to shut the engine of unintentionally.

Another safety benefit of keyless go is fewer split knee caps in crashes from keys and ornaments dangling in front of the knee. My brother is an Orthopedic Surgeon and has fixed many of these and even fished out some buried key/fob pieces from knees. If you think you are kicking your window out with a split knee cap while upside down, engine smoking, and gas pouring out of the tank better come up with plan B.
 

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Every European car I have owned (including my '72 Capri) had a mechanical lock out in the ignition switch that would not allow you to grind the starter with the engine running. American and Japanese makes even today don't have a clue.

I am a huge fan of keyless start and won't own another car without it (said the same thing in 2004 about window curtain airbags) but people (Camry drivers) better be well versed by reading the manual on how to shut the engine down in an emergency.

In '65 my dad had a '63 Imperial that had a throttle stick with all of us in the car. While braking, and fighting the acceleration, he simply clicked the key to the off position and brought it to a controlled stop. Traffic conditions would not allow less drastic measures.

How does one "turn the key off" in an emergency while a push button start car is in drive going down the road? Pushing the button won't shut it off as Camry drivers found out. One must PUSH AND HOLD the button for 2-3 seconds to shut down the engine in an emergency. A quick flick like you do in the garage while in park won't do it. That makes sense, you don't want an accidental bump of the button to shut the engine of unintentionally.

Another safety benefit of keyless go is fewer split knee caps in crashes from keys and ornaments dangling in front of the knee. My brother is an Orthopedic Surgeon and has fixed many of these and even fished out some buried key/fob pieces from knees. If you think you are kicking your window out with a split knee cap while upside down, engine smoking, and gas pouring out of the tank better come up with plan B.
Our '11 Fusion has the ignition where you can't double turn it on. Even my TSX didn't have that feature.

Another benefit of no ignition yo go with the knee cap thing is no worn out ignition. Ppl don't realize carrying their 3 ton key gains wears out the ignition tumbler, and therefore pulls it loose. Then the car won't start, and the ignition has to be replaced.
 

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Our '11 Fusion has the ignition where you can't double turn it on. Even my TSX didn't have that feature.

Another benefit of no ignition yo go with the knee cap thing is no worn out ignition. Ppl don't realize carrying their 3 ton key gains wears out the ignition tumbler, and therefore pulls it loose. Then the car won't start, and the ignition has to be replaced.
Most likely because the Fusion is Euro based like my '72 Capri. Ford may have stepped up on other models too mayhap because Ford has the most influence from Euro makes for several years.

GM just issued a recall on the Cobalt from a few years ago as heavy key fob ornaments were shutting engines off while in motion. This was just in the last few days.

The Chevrolet Cobalt and the Pontiac G5 were retired years ago, but that doesn't mean they can't be recalled. As proof, General Motors is recalling nearly 780,000 of them to repair faulty ignition switches that have been linked to six fatalities.

According to ABC, the recall affects the 2005-2007 Chevrolet Cobalt and the 2007 Pontiac G5. Those vehicles have an ignition switch that can, under certain circumstances, shut off the engine while the vehicle is in motion, dramatically increasing the risk of an accident. The shut off can be triggered in a number of ways -- for example, by a heavy keychain or by travel over rough roads.

Full Article
 

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I would love a folding key option for my sport. The key is always poking me in my leg while in my pocket. I emailed several guys and nothing yet for the 2014
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