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2010 2.4EX
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Discussion Starter #1
Semi-related: I bought and am really digging my 2010 Accord back in February, now 72,000 miles on her.

How can I find out if the TIming Belt was switched out on it prior to my tenure in the drivers seat?
 

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Semi-related: I bought and am really digging my 2010 Accord back in February, now 72,000 miles on her.

How can I find out if the TIming Belt was switched out on it prior to my tenure in the drivers seat?
Remove the front upper timing belt cover, then crank the engine manually and look for the prints on the timing belt. If the prints on the timing belt are barely worn out then the belt is relatively new. However, that's not a good indicator of the belt's condition. Changing of the timing belt is based on both mileage and time. You can sometimes find a relatively new belt but it's been on there for 10 years because the owner barely drive the car. If you don't feel comfortable about it then change it out.
 

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2010 2.4EX
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Remove the front upper timing belt cover, then crank the engine manually and look for the prints on the timing belt. If the prints on the timing belt are barely worn out then the belt is relatively new. However, that's not a good indicator of the belt's condition. Changing of the timing belt is based on both mileage and time. You can sometimes find a relatively new belt but it's been on there for 10 years because the owner barely drive the car. If you don't feel comfortable about it then change it out.

Thanks, not very reassuring. How involved is removing that upper cover for a visual check?

I heard somewhere that mechanics could simply run a car's VIN on some database, and find out in a couple of minutes any major work(such as a timing belt or chain) was done on it. Ever hear of that?
 

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The majority of people change it based on mileage. Not sure about the 4-cylinder but on the V6, the recommended interval is 105k miles. I would presume it has not been changed. Visual checks are probably not reliable (enough).

Carfax will only show information if the shop that did the work submitted it. Even if they did the work and entered the info, it might only say "Performed scheduled maintenance" or "Changed drive belt". The second one really means the serpentine belt but a simple data entry mistake could confuse it.
 

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HK Moderator
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The majority of people change it based on mileage. Not sure about the 4-cylinder but on the V6, the recommended interval is 105k miles. I would presume it has not been changed. Visual checks are probably not reliable (enough).
The recommended interval for the 4 cylinder is never, as the 8th Gen's 4 cylinder engine has a timing chain, not a timing belt. Timing chains are not replacement items unless the engine was abused e.g. by running it low on oil.

The recommended interval to change the timing belt and such for the 8th Gen's V6 engine is NOT 105K miles. You can look it up in the owner's manual, available online here:
 

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I have NEVER hard of vin number being able to tell if certain major maintenance is done on a car. For one, my own car isn't checked, that's for sure! I've done the last 2 timing belt jobs myself and who said it was ever recorded??

The serpentine belt and the auto tensioner need to be removed before you can remove the front upper timing belt for any J-series V6 engine. That takes me about about 10 minutes or less, but I can't say for others.
 

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Cruising in Montana
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The recommended interval for the 4 cylinder is never, as the 8th Gen's 4 cylinder engine has a timing chain, not a timing belt. Timing chains are not replacement items unless the engine was abused e.g. by running it low on oil.
Good catch!

RickBlaine is right, there is no timing belt on the 4-cyl. I suspect the belt the OP is talking about is the serpentine belt, which has no set replacement time. Replace it on an as-needed basis. Failure of this belt while the engine is running does not result in expensive repairs, unlike a timing belt.
 

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The recommended interval for the 4 cylinder is never, as the 8th Gen's 4 cylinder engine has a timing chain, not a timing belt. Timing chains are not replacement items unless the engine was abused e.g. by running it low on oil.
I knew Honda had switched to a timing chain on 4-cylinders in the early 2000s, starting with I'm guessing the '03 Accords, but based on this thread, I figured, eh, they went back to a belt....
 

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2010 2.4EX
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, not very reassuring.

I heard somewhere that mechanics could simply run a car's VIN on some database, and find out in a couple of minutes any major work(such as a timing belt or change) was done on it. Ever hear of that?
Good catch!

RickBlaine is right, there is no timing belt on the 4-cyl. I suspect the belt the OP is talking about is the serpentine belt, which has no set replacement time. Replace it on an as-needed basis. Failure of this belt while the engine is running does not result in expensive repairs, unlike a timing belt.

Thanks all! Saved a lot of head-scratching. Now I can concentrate on things like how to unpower the Active Noise Cancellation(ANC) module in my 2010 EX changer head unit!

I knew Honda had switched to a timing chain on 4-cylinders in the early 2000s, starting with I'm guessing the '03 Accords, but based on this thread, I figured, eh, they went back to a belt....
Read posts# 6 & 8. Applies to Gen8 4Cyl Accds.
 
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