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Over here in NY, we generally get 93, 89, and 87. There is often a 50¢ difference between 93 and 87, but only a 10¢ difference between 93 and 89.
 

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REV29K
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Seems odd anyone would buy mid-grade anymore. Maybe there are some older cars that still require 89 octane but it would be hard to believe they couldn't run on 87. I've never purchased 89 octane in my life, if stations stopped selling it, I wouldn't even notice.

However, there are a few stations around that sell ethanol-free gas, that seem like a better mid-grade choice to me although I think the cost is at least as high as premium fuel.
 

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However, there are a few stations around that sell ethanol-free gas, that seem like a better mid-grade choice to me although I think the cost is at least as high as premium fuel.
Our experience is that the ethanol free fuels gives you 4% better fuel economy. We recommend this for endurance car racing where fuel economy and pits stops are important.

Performance wise - and tuned specifically for it - the more ethanol the better.
 

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In CA there are generally three grades available: 87, 89 and 91. I usually run 89 unless the owner's manual states high octane required. In reality, the price difference is negligible.
I run 89 in both my cars, I honestly can fell a little pep in the step as opposed to 87. Around my parts ethanol free fuel sells for $2 a gal over regular.
 

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Some possibly new information.

The Accord 2.0 uses regular gas, and is listed at 252 HP.
The new RDX with the 2.0 and 10 speed is listed at 272.

Typically, the Acura asks for premium. The question really is whether it is the same 2.0 and 10 speed auto in both the RDX and the Accord 2.0 and the only difference being which grade gas is used for the numbers?

I personally think so. I don't really think the Acura 2.0 is specially modified. We will see as more info on the 2019 RDX comes out, but if it asks for premium, well, that's it, I think.
 

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2018 Accord EX-L 2.0T
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Yep. Same engine and transmission:

VTEC Turbo Engine with Higher Performance and Efficiency

The new RDX takes power from a direct-injected and turbocharged 2.0-liter, 16-valve powerplant with DOHC VTEC®️*valvetrain and Dual Variable Timing Cam (Dual VTC). Peak output is 272 horsepower and 280 lb.-ft. of torque. Compared to the previous model's V6, peak torque is up 28 lb.-ft. and available across a wider section of the power band, from 1,600 to 4,500 rpm (previously 252 lb.-ft. at 4,900 rpm) with low-RPM torque boosted by as much as 40 percent for quicker acceleration and sharper throttle response.

Segment-first 10-Speed Transmission

The RDX's turbocharged engine is paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission (10AT) – the first and only 10AT in the class. With more closely spaced ratios and a 62 percent wider ratio range, Acura's 10AT takes full advantage of the turbo engine's bountiful low-end torque. Gear changes are quick and seamless, in both automatic mode and using steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters.
 

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but is it the k20c4 specifically? same head and same turbo? i think its going to be slightly different like how theres many k20s and k24s already out there ranging in power depending on what chassis it came from
 

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Running a higher Octane fuel in turbocharged cars is always the best case scenario. Although Honda states that 87 is just fine for operation, you will notice a difference in power as well as having the side benefit of better knock avoidance. This is especially true in areas with higher average temperatures.
 

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Running a higher Octane fuel in turbocharged cars is always the best case scenario. Although Honda states that 87 is just fine for operation, you will notice a difference in power as well as having the side benefit of better knock avoidance. This is especially true in areas with higher average temperatures.
and run 93 with ethanol in it and you get even more optimal performance, turbos love the cooling effect of ethanol
 

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and run 93 with ethanol in it and you get even more optimal performance, turbos love the cooling effect of ethanol
I would love to run E85 in this car. I have a Flex Fuel setup on my GTR and with about 70% Ethanol the car picked up about 100whp and 110wtq...just changing fuel and tuning.
 

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I would love to run E85 in this car. I have a Flex Fuel setup on my GTR and with about 70% Ethanol the car picked up about 100whp and 110wtq...just changing fuel and tuning.
Im betting just like the civic, the target ethanol content going to be in the 30-40% ethanol range. Derek with IMW is looking for a tester for flex fuel kit to see how it goes with the Accord so I imagine something will be hitting the market soon.
 

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I would love to run E85 in this car. I have a Flex Fuel setup on my GTR and with about 70% Ethanol the car picked up about 100whp and 110wtq...just changing fuel and tuning.
At some point you're going to grenade the connecting rods, transmission, or who-knows-what-else on the Accord making moar powahhh pointless.

Beyond getting Stage 2 I would focus on upgraded tires, handling (sway bars), and brakes (SS lines, better pads, etc) before even thinking about more power. Performance wise having a lower average charge-air-temperature and faster turbo spool would also be nice.
 

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At some point you're going to grenade the connecting rods, transmission, or who-knows-what-else on the Accord making moar powahhh pointless.

Beyond getting Stage 2 I would focus on upgraded tires, handling (sway bars), and brakes (SS lines, better pads, etc) before even thinking about more power. Performance wise having a lower average charge-air-temperature and faster turbo spool would also be nice.
Well if you're throwing a lot of boost and timing at anything you'll pop the motor for sure. It's all about how the car is calibrated and how aggressive the tune is. It's really the torque that kills motors/transmissions, so as long as your tuner keeps it sane and ramps the power correctly it should be happy.

I don't think any of us bought this car to be track heroes anyway...I just want a little more power and to be able to use something other than crappy CA 91. Flex Fuel would be ideal of course because you could do a nice 50/50 mix and keep things happy.
 

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At some point you're going to grenade the connecting rods, transmission, or who-knows-what-else on the Accord making moar powahhh pointless.

Beyond getting Stage 2 I would focus on upgraded tires, handling (sway bars), and brakes (SS lines, better pads, etc) before even thinking about more power. Performance wise having a lower average charge-air-temperature and faster turbo spool would also be nice.
Well if you're throwing a lot of boost and timing at anything you'll pop the motor for sure. It's all about how the car is calibrated and how aggressive the tune is. It's really the torque that kills motors/transmissions, so as long as your tuner keeps it sane and ramps the power correctly it should be happy.

I don't think any of us bought this car to be track heroes anyway...I just want a little more power and to be able to use something other than crappy CA 91. Flex Fuel would be ideal of course because you could do a nice 50/50 mix and keep things happy.
E85 is not pointless. You can actually pull the boost back and add ignition on e40 blend so you can save the life of the turbo and still be safe with the tq numbers
 

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E85 is not pointless. You can actually pull the boost back and add ignition on e40 blend so you can save the life of the turbo and still be safe with the tq numbers
Not sure what you're getting at with the pointless part, but even at E80 you can have your tuner just keep the torque numbers low. It's not necessarily saving the turbo, it's more about not snapping rods with too much torque too soon. This motor seems to just have tons of torque down low, so I'm sure adding E85 to the mix would just make that torque number shoot up exponentially.
 

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Not sure what you're getting at with the pointless part, but even at E80 you can have your tuner just keep the torque numbers low. It's not necessarily saving the turbo, it's more about not snapping rods with too much torque too soon. This motor seems to just have tons of torque down low, so I'm sure adding E85 to the mix would just make that torque number shoot up exponentially.
The other dude was telling us to do everything but e85 which means he thinks its pointless. Yes adding e85 will jump the numbers but my tuner is smart enough to know the limits and where those numbers need to be in my boost by gear calibration.
 

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The other dude was telling us to do everything but e85 which means he thinks its pointless. Yes adding e85 will jump the numbers but my tuner is smart enough to know the limits and where those numbers need to be in my boost by gear calibration.
I'm curious to see what the theoretical limit of effectiveness is with ethanol content with the stock fuel system. I know the high pressure fuel pumps are leaning towards maxing out pretty quickly once ethanol is in the mix.

I've had a few conversations with my tuner and even he stated that anything above E70 really isn't adding any additional value. I don't have a lot of experience with DI cars and ethanol, so I'd love to see some data on what the limits are in terms of ethanol content.
 

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Ethanol and fuel pump capacity

I'm curious to see what the theoretical limit of effectiveness is with ethanol content with the stock fuel system. I know the high pressure fuel pumps are leaning towards maxing out pretty quickly once ethanol is in the mix.

I've had a few conversations with my tuner and even he stated that anything above E70 really isn't adding any additional value. I don't have a lot of experience with DI cars and ethanol, so I'd love to see some data on what the limits are in terms of ethanol content.
Our tests with the 1.5 Civic on E85 do not show any drop in fuel pressure at torque levels over 400 lb-ft and power levels around 370 HP. This is on the stock fuel system.

Ethanol has a very high latent heat of evaporation. This means it cools the intake charge, pistons, head and cylinders much more than pump fuel. So the higher the ethanol content, the greater the safety factor. If you are planning to race your car, run the highest ethanol content possible. Some turbo drag cars run no intercooler and ethanol. For the street you can run a lower ethanol content.
 

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Our tests with the 1.5 Civic on E85 do not show any drop in fuel pressure at torque levels over 400 lb-ft and power levels around 370 HP. This is on the stock fuel system.

Ethanol has a very high latent heat of evaporation. This means it cools the intake charge, pistons, head and cylinders much more than pump fuel. So the higher the ethanol content, the greater the safety factor. If you are planning to race your car, run the highest ethanol content possible. Some turbo drag cars run no intercooler and ethanol. For the street you can run a lower ethanol content.
So when the newbies try to do that they can start having issues due to the fuel lines, injectors, and fuel pump not being optimized for ethanol huh? That would be helpful to list specific items needed to run that much of a concentration......then they wouldn't be screaming when the issues arose if they did not approach that build/tune properly.
 

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We have got to qualify these statements and not just for new people wanting more performance.

Ethanol also attracts water and humidity (in the air) very well. This is why small engines such as lawnmowers, chainsaws, snow throwers, etc. don't like ethanol- it will "gum up" the carbs in a few weeks if it is in your float bowl.

Now with a modern car with a computer that can advance timing and such, as well as fuel injectors instead of a carb- you may get longer use out of ethanol sitting in fuel rails, gas tanks, etc....but adding ethanol content beyond what the manufacturer designed the car to handle (rubber seals, fuel lines, fuel pump) is asking for trouble down the road.
 
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