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@tisuanhoc87 asked about fuel as it relates to high elevation. Regular fuel is 85-octane up there. 87-octane is mid-grade fuel up there, like 89-octane is mid-grade at lower elevation. Knowing that he can safely run "regular" 85-octane in his NA Civic, he wanted to confirm that he still needed 87-octane in the new Accord due to the turbo, even though it is considered mid-grade octane at high elevation. I think his question was more about avoiding potential engine damage than using higher octane to boost power.
My response was to visionguru and testing. We already have the testing done for us was my point. It is a user decision, and one user decision is not more right than the other. I personally have used only 93 in my 18 accord since I bought it last month.
 

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@tisuanhoc87 asked about fuel as it relates to high elevation. Regular fuel is 85-octane up there. 87-octane is mid-grade fuel up there, like 89-octane is mid-grade at lower elevation. Knowing that he can safely run "regular" 85-octane in his NA Civic, he wanted to confirm that he still needed 87-octane in the new Accord due to the turbo, even though it is considered mid-grade octane at high elevation.

(EDIT) I think his question was more about avoiding potential engine damage than using higher octane to boost power. Even though the turbo Accord is designed to operate on regular fuel, which is 87-octane for most of us, running "regular" 85-octane at high elevation would probably cause too much engine knock for the ECU to compensate. Because the turbo compensates for thinner air, the turbo still needs 87-octane, even up there.
Yes, I concerned more about potential engine damage than boosting power. I don't mind to pay more a few bucks. I'm just not sure If I use higher or lower than recommend, it will damage my car. So starting from now, I'm going to use 87-octane for my both cars. I'm not traveling out of state with my car so I don't need to worry about changing higher octane. Thank you for your help.
 

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What fuel do you run in your Accord?

2019 Sport 2.0T here. Just emptied the tank the dealer gave me and filled it up with Shell V-Power® NiTRO+ Premium 93.
 

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87. That's what the car is designed to run on. 93 won't hurt it, but I don't think you'll see a noticeable boost in performance that is worth the extra cost of 93.
 

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Hondata has interpolated that it was designed to run on some like 100 octane, and increases the knock control by pulling timing to run even 87.
I guess it's up to you if you can feel it, but it is there. And they were only comparing 87 to 91!
 

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Its been stated several times, you get more power with 93, but it is up to you and your wallet what you want. Even before mine had any sort of tuner, I ran 93 from day one.
 

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Just in case we needed more info on this subject:

https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/comparison-feature/a28565486/honda-cr-v-vs-bmw-m5-ford-f-150-dodge-charger/

Almost all the cars tested gained about 5% more power on premium but those gains did nothing to change performance. Well, the Ford 150 was the anomaly. The CRV, M5 and Charger R/T had no changes in trap speed. Given that 5-6% increase in power, I was surprised the cars showed essentially no improvement in performance.
@Hondata mentioned that the overall engine strategy was boost control; so, in the case of increased timing with higher octane, maybe the power comes more from the "engine" providing more output and the turbo providing less input, but the overall hp/tq remains relatively the same...maybe a few hp/tq higher.
 

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both KTuner and Hondata have posted dyno's showing gains from better fuel

Not a ton, but you do make more power
I bought a Honda Accord 1.5L Turbo in Mexico City, I choose the smaller engine because fuel is very expensive in Mexico. The car's manual indicates I should use 89 octane gasoline, in mexico we only have two types of gasoline 87 and 92 Octane, so I use 92 octane in my car (once I used 87 octane and fuel consumption increased), so far so good. In the USA, according to the Manual in the Mexican cars, you should be using the 89 Octane gas. I traveled from Mexico City to McAllen, Tx in my car and was able to use 89 Octane gasoline, I notice no difference in terms of performance or consumption, so I think it should be safe for you to use 89 Octane gasoline as it is available in your country. I hope this helps.
According to the owners manual, the 10th Gen Accord only requires 87 octane or higher. I love this but it also surprised me especially being a turbo car. Are you aware of any benefit to running 91 or 93 octane in these cars? Will the ECU automatically adjust any parameters to increase performance?

I have the Accord 2.0T and I'm curious if you guys are running 87 or 91-93 in your tanks.

For instance, straight from my Nissan Frontier 4.0L owners manual:


Any thoughts?

MODERATOR EDIT:
"Premium Fuel" is generally thought of as referring to octane rating or even "Top Tier" fuel. Gasoline with "up to 10%" ethanol mixed in is the usual here in the USA, but you can get higher ethanol concentrations (up to 15% ethanol) at the gas station and even some fuels that are 85% ethanol. If you are in Brazil, 100% ethanol is everywhere.

Some of these fuels have the same octane ratings. So some 100% gasoline fuels have an octane rating of 91, so do some "E-10" (90% gasoline + 10% ethanol) and "E-15" (85% gasoline = 15% ethanol). So "octane rating" or the "Premium label" alone are not enough to distinguish what you should put in your fuel tank.

It is VERY important to understand that when tuners (and their minions) speak of more power- they are talking about what the tuning product can do for power output, not what your engine and fuel system were originally designed for. Some posters here are mentioning "premium fuel", "octane rating" and "ethanol" and are NOT mentioning that you can't simply pour in higher concentrations of ethanol unless your Accord has been modified/adapted to accept higher concentrations of ethanol.

Yes, the TUNE product you purchased can handle it, but your car's fuel system as designed and built by the manufacturer may only be able to handle a certain concentration of ethanol before you have problems. Don't "wing it"- properly modify your car's fuel system IF you want to take advantage of the higher power output a tune can give you should you increase your ethanol content.

I would ask everyone in the performance section here to remember that you may be saying/posting it for the 1,000th time, but newbies might be reading it for the first time. Explain these things, please.

This is what sets DriveAccord apart from lesser forums, and the chimps in the wild.
 

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@Pedro380 : a couple of points here.

First off, Mexico City is at 2200m elevation, so higher octane is recommended generally and for turbo chargers definitely. (Not that the 1.5L Accord is busting bolts with its turbo). So using the higher number is not only recommended (never go lower) but due to the higher elevation, it's a good thing for the turbo engine.

Secondly, and I'll confess to some ignorance on the point, different places in the world establish octane with different methods. So what gets a "97" octane rating in Europe is pretty much a 91 octane rating in the USA. I don't know what method Mexico uses to determine octane numbers.

When you used the 87 octane, the ECU may have detected some detonation and automatically enriched the mixture to delay ignition and stave off detonation. This would result in higher consumption.

McAllen is near sea level, so detonation won't happen with the lower octane in "normal" driving.
 

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@AlanTheBeastV2 Higher elevation requires lower octane fuel for the same result. In high altitude areas like Colorado, octane ratings between grades are 85-87-91. In lower elevation areas like Texas, octane ratings between grades are 87-89-93.
 

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This thread's a joke. Every damn forum for every damn model of car has this kind of thread, 50x over. 1% of the people who comment are qualified to do so, but the other 99% keep coming in waves.

Higher octane matters, especially in turbocharged, DI vehicles. Hell even in normally aspirated engines you can see a 10+ hp difference from 91+ vs 87, with way less knock, especially at high load, low rpms.

If you need evidence just look at the Mazda 2.5L Turbo. They literally put in their marketed specs something like 250+ hp on 93 octane, and like 227 on 87. Torque remains the same at peak, but is probably down below and above the peak.
 

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I am shocked this is still going on. It is simple, I run 93 from Costco, 0.49 knock control on my Ktuner all the time, or almost all the time. 87, it goes UP and implements knock control! Been proven to do the same on a stock car, so...
 

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This thread's a joke. Every damn forum for every damn model of car has this kind of thread, 50x over.
It's no joke, Tuco- it's a rope. One of the things we do here at DriveAccord is merge every single one of these new "Does premium fuel equal more HP?" threads started by non-searching newbies into one giant thread- so we don't have 50 redundant threads here at DriveAccord. Same for "Duh, when should I change my oil?"

And I like to point out that "premium" is a marketing term with no legal definition. It could also mean 100% gasoline (no ethanol).

1% of the people who comment are qualified to do so, but the other 99% keep coming in waves.
@Baldeagle in post #87 above is qualified- read his post. Does more HP from higher octane fuel equal higher trap speed? In most cases, no....sad but true.
 
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