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How To Remove The Rotor Screws From Your Honda/Acura’s Brake Rotors

I GOT IT!

Pitboard link to full article:
How To Remove The Rotor Screws From Your Honda/Acura’s Brake Rotors HeelToeAuto.com's Pit Board


mrheeltoe said:
How To Remove The Rotor Screws From Your Honda/Acura’s Brake Rotors



I hate these screws. Most European cars don’t even have them, but for some reason the Japanese feel the need to equip their cars with them. The reason they are there is to hold the rotor securely to the hub of the car once the wheel is removed. If you look at how the whole assembly of hub/studs, rotor, wheel, and lug nuts fits together, you will see that these screws serve no purpose once the wheel is installed. The screws exist merely as an unnecessary assembly aide.

Their function is so superficial, in fact, that they are made out of what must be the softest metallic substance on the entire car. Under any load from the brakes, I can imagine these screws’ heads popping off instantly. Alas, they are on the car holding the rotor in place and must be removed in order to change rotors (another insufficiently designed component of the Honda/Acura braking system, but that is another blog topic...) The process of removing these screws appears to be as simple as grabbing a phillips head screwdriver and giving them a twist.

Unfortunately, life creates it’s own interesting moments when it is realized that even a very minimal amount of unseen corrosion or galvanic action LOCKS these bad boys in place, causing the screws to strip with ease. Once these guys are stripped, you need to grab a drill and bore out the heads to get them off. I have done this drilling more often than I have had the miraculous joy of actually removing the screws properly. I never want to do it again.

Let’s say, I were to stop writing here. One might no doubt search their favorite message forum and read all of the wonders of a tool called an impact driver. This tool is a sort of screw-driver with a spring-loaded twisting action that works when the handle is hit with a hammer. The idea is, the hammer forces the driver into the screw while the spring action twists the screw just enough to break it free. Much of the time, and impact driver is the perfect tool for the job. But I content this method is no sure-fire way to unscrew these screwy screws without possible need for the drill.

Problem one with the driver is, not everyone has one, and not everyone who changes brakes every 2-3 years wants to buy one. In order to get one that works reliably, you’ll need to spend enough money that you might well have paid someone to do your brakes for you. I’ve used cheap ones, and broken them almost instantly. Bonus…before they broke, they stripped the screws.

Problem two, even with a good driver there exists an estimated 10% chance you’s strip a screw anyway because the screws are just that bitchy.

So here is my SURE FIRE, WORKED EVERY TIME I DID IT WITHOUT FAIL way of removing the rotor screws from your brake rotors. It involves two simple tools nearly everyone has in their tool box.

Pitboard link to full article:
How To Remove The Rotor Screws From Your Honda/Acura’s Brake Rotors HeelToeAuto.com's Pit Board


Thanks fer readin'!

Marcus


949-295-1668
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Impact hammer works for me everytime
Good! :) I hate it when it doesn't. Maybe my experience is amplified because of the work I do. Even still, if someone doesn't own one, I don't see the point to buying one. That is more the point. I do give impact drivers credit.

Through all the postings we have made in our marketing network, I am really surprised at all the comments this has spawned. (although not on the actual blog site, which I find pretty odd...).

Most people are really supportive and like the write-up. Most of those people have interjected their input as far as how they get the screws off. All that is great! For the record, I am perfectly aware that there are a great many ways that one may remove these screws. I prefer this method because it is the only method I have used in the last 14 years that has not once necessitated getting a drill out. In the hundreds of screws I have removed and the half-a-dozen or so methods I have used, this one has NEVER FAILED ME. For an unprofessional and inexperienced DIYer, that is of utmost importance; reliability of process.

Surprisingly, I have only had one critic saying the method was idiotic, and saying they "would actually be embarrassed for even suggesting this method." My retort was simply that "buying $20 tool to remove screws that really should not exist and will be thrown away is idiotic."

Obviously there is more than one way to skin a cat. But reliability, consistency, predictability, and VALUE...all these are the traits that make a part or a process HT-SPEC!

Marcus
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Those screws on Honda/Acura brake-rotors have ruined a great many D.I.Y. afternoons of mine over the years. Anything to make the removal less aggravating (via hand-tools) is always well appreciated. . .
 

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The fastest way to remove these stuck screws is to drill off the head and the remove the stud thats left with a vise-grip. Done.

To prevent them from sticking, add anti-sieze on them during your first brake job or first tire rotation. You'll never have another problem with them.

And I take the side of their continued use.
 

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their purpose is to hold the rotors on while the car travels down the assembly line. No other purpose. The caliper and wheel seem to hold them on just fine..lol
 

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their purpose is to hold the rotors on while the car travels down the assembly line. No other purpose. The caliper and wheel seem to hold them on just fine..lol
Prove it...

What I know as fact is the screws center the rotor very precisely.

Not close, or just close enough not to notice, the center the rotor PRECISELY.

There are other methods that can hold the rotor in place during assembly, and this IMO isn’t one of them. Adding 8 screws per car just to hold the brake disc on the car while it moves down the line??? Yeah right!

I think you guys need to watch some automotive assembly line videos and watch how much is preassembled prior to coming to the main assembly line.
 

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O brother......Yea a small screw will hold the rotor in place with all of the pressure that is applied to it from the pads.... Gim be a break.....:lmao:
 

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Through all the postings we have made in our marketing network, I am really surprised at all the comments this has spawned. (although not on the actual blog site, which I find pretty odd...).

Most people are really supportive and like the write-up. Most of those people have interjected their input as far as how they get the screws off. All that is great! For the record, I am perfectly aware that there are a great many ways that one may remove these screws. I prefer this method because it is the only method I have used in the last 14 years that has not once necessitated getting a drill out. In the hundreds of screws I have removed and the half-a-dozen or so methods I have used, this one has NEVER FAILED ME. For an unprofessional and inexperienced DIYer, that is of utmost importance; reliability of process.

Surprisingly, I have only had one critic saying the method was idiotic, and saying they "would actually be embarrassed for even suggesting this method." My retort was simply that "buying $20 tool to remove screws that really should not exist and will be thrown away is idiotic."

Obviously there is more than one way to skin a cat. But reliability, consistency, predictability, and VALUE...all these are the traits that make a part or a process HT-SPEC!

Marcus
949-295-1668
I used to work on mostly all Japanese import's (Mazda ,Toyota , Nissan ) and I would use this method too . I would first give the screw a good hit with hammer , hoping to shock it a bit . then do chisel to turn it , sometimes I ended up drilling if really frozen . There really no sure way , I just try easy first and work your way up, eventually it will come off .
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I used to work on mostly all Japanese import's (Mazda ,Toyota , Nissan ) and I would use this method too . I would first give the screw a good hit with hammer , hoping to shock it a bit . then do chisel to turn it , sometimes I ended up drilling if really frozen . There really no sure way , I just try easy first and work your way up, eventually it will come off .
Well said and thanks for the support ;)

We you gotta do 12 in a day and that impact driver doesn't work 100% of the time, you need something a bit more sure-fire.

Prove it...

What I know as fact is the screws center the rotor very precisely.

Not close, or just close enough not to notice, the center the rotor PRECISELY.

There are other methods that can hold the rotor in place during assembly, and this IMO isn’t one of them. Adding 8 screws per car just to hold the brake disc on the car while it moves down the line??? Yeah right!

I think you guys need to watch some automotive assembly line videos and watch how much is preassembled prior to coming to the main assembly line.


The centering of the rotor thing is not true. Proper rotors are hub-centric, making that issue moot. I could fathom the rotors needing to be secured during assembly, and have my own suspicions this could be true (and equality as many thinking it is unnecessary), the fact remains that once the car is assembled, the screws are no longer needed. When servicing the brakes it is an entirely different circumstance than building the car on an assembly line.
 

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The centering of the rotor thing is not true. Proper rotors are hub-centric, making that issue moot. I could fathom the rotors needing to be secured during assembly, and have my own suspicions this could be true (and equality as many thinking it is unnecessary), the fact remains that once the car is assembled, the screws are no longer needed. When servicing the brakes it is an entirely different circumstance than building the car on an assembly line.
Do you know any Honda authored Service Bulletin treating about this subject?
We could guess for days what is the purpose for these bolts/screws but it would be nice to hear it from Honda engineer guys...
 

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I changed my rotors and pads today (80k miles, Civic). Needed or not, my buddy suggested I put the screws back in with a dab of loctite, so I went with it.

Anyways, thanks again for the link.
 

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I changed my rotors and pads today (80k miles, Civic). Needed or not, my buddy suggested I put the screws back in with a dab of loctite, so I went with it.

Anyways, thanks again for the link.
Loctite? That's the last thing you want or need to put on these two screws.

Think about it, the rotor is sandwiched tightly between the wheel and the hub with 4 or 5 hefty wheel studs and wheel nuts, the rotor isn't going anywhere if the wheel nuts are torqued down properly.

Even if these screws do come loose, it wouldn't be more than one thread or so, they are also not going to fall out since the wheel is there to clamp the screws in place.

Sounds like your buddy needs a bit of Automotive 101 course before he makes more illogical recommendations.
 

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My 6G has been without screws for over 150K and my 8G for over 20K.

I have never used a impact driver to remove....drill works quicker especially with left hand bit.

No pulsation on either..:dunno:

If you go to the plant you will see the car come down the line w/rotors installed and no calipers. You will also see two threaded holes to put screws in to help press rotor off the hub when removing. Same size and thread pitch as the ones you removed.

I1:)
 

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Loctite? That's the last thing you want or need to put on these two screws.

Think about it, the rotor is sandwiched tightly between the wheel and the hub with 4 or 5 hefty wheel studs and wheel nuts, the rotor isn't going anywhere if the wheel nuts are torqued down properly.

Even if these screws do come loose, it wouldn't be more than one thread or so, they are also not going to fall out since the wheel is there to clamp the screws in place.

Sounds like your buddy needs a bit of Automotive 101 course before he makes more illogical recommendations.
Yeah, I was skeptical too. But I took out the screws today. I feel a lot better for my next brake maintenance.
 

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I just said to heck with these screws, and left all eight out. It's just a waste of time to put them back on.
 
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