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The centering of the rotor thing is not true. Proper rotors are hub-centric, making that issue moot. I could fathom the rotors needing to be secured during assembly, and have my own suspicions this could be true (and equality as many thinking it is unnecessary), the fact remains that once the car is assembled, the screws are no longer needed. When servicing the brakes it is an entirely different circumstance than building the car on an assembly line.
Those countersunk head screws absolutely center the rotors. It’s not for debate...that’s what countersunk screws do. It’s the same methodology used to center your wheels with lug nuts, the countersink forces center positioning.

The hub and lugs do not center perfectly. (close, but not precise) There is clearance over the hub and lugs which leads to the rotor being slightly off center when assembled. And the lug nuts center the wheel, and only the wheel.

To use or not use the screws is the debate here.
Honda's purpose for them is unknown, and dealers will replace them.
They do center the rotor precisely, but not using them hasn’t been shown to cause an issue.

Nothing but the facts.
 

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Gee if you want the screws in put them back in..... If not leave them, out...... They are not needed. If it makes you sleep better at night install them back in....This thing about countersink and true hub aliglnment is bull....... They are there for one reason only.. To keep them on during assembly... That is all....
 

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Those countersunk head screws absolutely center the rotors. It’s not for debate...that’s what countersunk screws do. It’s the same methodology used to center your wheels with lug nuts, the countersink forces center positioning.

The hub and lugs do not center perfectly. (close, but not precise) There is clearance over the hub and lugs which leads to the rotor being slightly off center when assembled. And the lug nuts center the wheel, and only the wheel.
Original screw is a flat Philips head M6, 14mm long.
Honda part number 93600-06014-0H, $0.52 each @ dealer.

For those of you who want to put the screws in here is much better replacement:

I have found the same screw with hex allan wrench head instead of cross/Philips.
This is the part number from mcmaster.com (great store btw!):
92125A237 FLAT HEAD SOCKET CAPS 18-8 M6/14mm.



They are 18-8 stainless so they will not rust and they cost $6.36 per pack of 25 ($0.26 each!).
When you get a pack of 25 you can share the screws with 2 other honda buddies!

I used them on front wheels of my 2004 Accord Coupe already and they fit perfectly. Will do rears next weekend.
I put mine dry, with no loctite or any other antiseize or anything.
I had to drill out originals, so had to get new screws anyway - did not want to deal with the issue again at next replacement.

Have fun with your honda!
 

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So you challenge the engineer who designed the brake system? Unless proven differently, the screws are there for a reason and they must be kept there...

Regards,
Rafael
It's only to hold the rotors in place while the calipers and brackets are to be assembled onto it.

On GM cars, they use two small star locking washers that must be destoryed to get the rotors off the wheel bearing hub.

No tech in the dealership service dept or independent shop replace them, they're discarded.

BMW's have the screws and they're not as soft as the Honda's are.

The only way the rotors is held on the car is due to the fact that it's sandwiched between the wheel bearing hub and the wheel and secured into place with 5 wheel lugs.

The caliper and pad does hold it in some but with the wheel removed, the rotor becomes 'angled' until the wheel is reinstalled.

So it comes down to keeping the rotor aligned while the workers or robots just slap the wheels on quickly to keep the line moving and not have to screw around or waste a few seconds to get it corrected.
 

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So it comes down to keeping the rotor aligned while the workers or robots just slap the wheels on quickly to keep the line moving and not have to screw around or waste a few seconds to get it corrected.
How many seconds does it to put the screws in compared to wasting few seconds to get rotors corrected? :)
 

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How many seconds does it to put the screws in compared to wasting few seconds to get rotors corrected? :)
Quite a bit less, if you have actually worked on replacing brake rotors on a car, then you would appreciate how the rotors can easily fall off the hub partially, this gets to be a pain when you are trying to bolt up the caliper bracket in a static "shade-tree mechanic" scenario with one hand holding the bracket and the other hand installing the bolts while the rotor has partially popped off, you almost need 3 hands!

Now imagine the factory moving assembly line environment, where a rotor partially fallen off the hub means the assembly worker has to put down the loaded caliper assembly, reinstall the rotor then pick up the caliper assembly hoping he/she doesn't bump the rotor to cause it to fall off again, I hope this is becoming clear the screws are there for manufacturing efficiency purpose first and foremost, any other benefits are merely byproduct, nothing more.
 

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This subject just gets beaten to death..... They are there for the assembly line just as others have stated.... If it makes you happy install the screws back in..... Me I dont and sleep well at night with no worries...
 

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I also had to drill these screws through to get my rotors out. The material of these is softer, looks like some alloy, definitely not steel. Got new ones from the dealer for $0.60 each. It's nice to have the screws on for common maintenance like a tire rotation - you don't want the rotors to become loose each time the wheel is removed. Chances are something may get in between the rotor and the wheel hub and when the wheel is mounted again it may be slightly off and cause brake pulsation or worse. The screws are also needed to hold the rotor in cases where there is a brake pulsation and a dial is used to figure out if there is a rotor run-out. Bottom line - you can live w/o them but it's worth spending an extra couple of bucks per axle.
 

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screws

The reason the heads are stripping no one is using a JIS bit. Phillips head has the wrong pitch and engagement. JIS screwdrivers do a search.
 

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Rotor bolts

There's a lot of discussion on whether these bolts are necessary. Some say they're needed for precise alignment. If that were true these two small bolts would need to be able to withstand the braking force = to 1/4 of the entire car fully loaded in a panic stop from high speed - else the alignment would be blown. In other words, they'd need to be able to absorb force equal to the studs that pass through the rotor. These are two little 4mm diam. bolts. Short answer: no way! Are these bolts necessary? If you have them, use them. But they're not mission critical --- they couldn't be.
 

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The reason the heads are stripping no one is using a JIS bit. Phillips head has the wrong pitch and engagement. JIS screwdrivers do a search.
lol good point, I didn't pay attention, but I used my cordless dewalt impact and had no issues at all getting the screws off
 

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Good! :) I hate it when it doesn't. Maybe my experience is amplified because of the work I do. Even still, if someone doesn't own one, I don't see the point to buying one. That is more the point. I do give impact drivers credit.

Through all the postings we have made in our marketing network, I am really surprised at all the comments this has spawned. (although not on the actual blog site, which I find pretty odd...).

Most people are really supportive and like the write-up. Most of those people have interjected their input as far as how they get the screws off. All that is great! For the record, I am perfectly aware that there are a great many ways that one may remove these screws. I prefer this method because it is the only method I have used in the last 14 years that has not once necessitated getting a drill out. In the hundreds of screws I have removed and the half-a-dozen or so methods I have used, this one has NEVER FAILED ME. For an unprofessional and inexperienced DIYer, that is of utmost importance; reliability of process.

Surprisingly, I have only had one critic saying the method was idiotic, and saying they "would actually be embarrassed for even suggesting this method." My retort was simply that "buying $20 tool to remove screws that really should not exist and will be thrown away is idiotic."

Obviously there is more than one way to skin a cat. But reliability, consistency, predictability, and VALUE...all these are the traits that make a part or a process HT-SPEC!

Marcus
949-295-1668
Nine years later and I want to say thank you. I have a 2016 V6 and I even got the proper JIS screwdrivers, Vessels with the built-in impact. The screws didn't budge even with penetrating fluid in there. Wow. Your way saved me because I was at a loss, so thank you again.
 
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