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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
Long time lurker, occasional poster. I have started doing maintenance on my 2013 Honda Accord EX since last year and thus far have done some basic ones, such as oil changes, spark plug replacements, coolant drain and fills etc. This is the first time I am tackling something a little bigger and so I would like to prepare myself to minimize any potential damage. As such, I would like some advice from you folks about the following points:

1. I have to buy the parts immediately, since my fronts are almost worn out. I am looking at these kits currently: Power Stop and Centric. I have a normal driving style, non-aggressive, easy balanced braking, mostly using my gears to aid braking. Occasional hard braking occurs due to the excess of crappy drivers here, but I would not take that too much into account. That being said, I am not looking for some high performance parts. Something to last me a long time would be great. Which of those kits would you folks recommend? Either or neither? Something else?

2. I have read and watched South Point Auto's videos and @t-rd's posts about the front and rear brake jobs done correctly. Anything else I should watch in depth before I attempt this?

3. Any other maintenance I would need to do, in addition to the replacements, such as brake fluid bleed and replace etc.? I am fairly new to DIY, so please excuse any silly questions.

4. Is there an list of tools I would need? For now, I have a torque wrench, breaker bar set, SAE/metric wrenches with extensions, ratchet wrench, hammer etc. I know I would need some anti-seize, lubricant, wire brushes etc. to get the rust off. Additions to this list?

Any and all help is most appreciated. Thank you in advance.

P.S: @t-rd, I did send you a DM, but am not sure if you get notified. So tagging you here, since you seem to view posts more regularly. :)
 

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Just remember that if done wrong can be extremely dangerous for yourself and others on the road. I do not mean to scare you but take extreme care when putting back together. I have used both of those brands for brake pads with great luck. Make sure they’re ceramic for the pads and not semi-metallic or organic. The rotors should be turned at a shop to make sure for quite and smooth braking. You can replace them but most likely does not need done this round. You need some hi temp grease for the slider pins and i apply a very small film to the brake bad hardware pieces.

Do one side at a time in case you need to check your work with the other side. Also press the brakes a couple times till firm once the car is on before putting in gear!! Brake fluid replacement is good maintenance. Look up some videos and you may want a bleeder kit but not necessary. With some rubber line on the bleeder valves and time you can gravity feed drain each caliper.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@Spector : Thank you for that advice. I believe the brake pads in both kits that I have linked are ceramic pads. What I forgot to add is that my car is currently at 120K miles and this is not a first time brake job on the car. It is just a first time DIY job. :) That being said, the rear rotors are mostly smooth (what I mean by mostly is that there is usual wear and tear, but nothing major). The front rotors are grooved, so they need replacing definitely. The reason I chose (or am choosing) to replace everything is that from now on, I will be doing the maintenance, so I don't have to track when I replaced a kit. I will just perform routine maintenance on them all at the same time (being lazy to track things separately I guess :p).

I have made a note of the other things that you have mentioned and will get them, since I am not sure when the brake fluid was last replaced. Like most noobs, I am assuming (at my own peril) that my trustworthy mechanic replaced it with the brake job the last time around.
 

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Did you get a JIS #3 screwdriver? If previous owner left the screw on the rotor, you probably have to spend A LOT effort taking it off...
 

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@t-rd does great write ups when it comes to brake info, follow his advice in the DIY section.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you get a JIS #3 screwdriver? If previous owner left the screw on the rotor, you probably have to spend A LOT effort taking it off...
No I didn't. Because I bought the car new and it has always been mine? Wondering if I said I bought it used some here? 🤔

Does that point apply to a mechanic working on the brakes too? 😁
 

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No I didn't. Because I bought the car new and it has always been mine? Wondering if I said I bought it used some here? 🤔

Does that point apply to a mechanic working on the brakes too? 😁
Oh sorry I misread some information before.

I think on probably all Honda models there is a nightmare screw which secures the rotor on wheel hub. It looks like a Phillips screwhead but actually is Japanese Industrial Standard, or JIS. In addition, it is quite tightened and further secured by rust if it has stayed on your car for 7 years without a move.

If you tackle it with a Phillips screwdriver, the screwhead can be easily stripped! By that time, your only solution is to cut a deeper groove on the screw (and the rotor) for flathead screwdriver.

So, you really want to get a JIS#3 screwdriver. You probably will find this kind of screwdriver which can be hammered and acts like an impact driver, but based on my experience it didn't work very well. Instead, I would recommend JIS#3 screw bits like this, which worked perfectly with a powerful impact driver. Still, make sure the bit is biting firmly on the screwhead before turning on the impact driver; my partner stripped one screwhead when he tried to play on it!
 

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No I didn't. Because I bought the car new and it has always been mine? Wondering if I said I bought it used some here? 🤔

Does that point apply to a mechanic working on the brakes too? 😁
You can buy an impact tool and get a JIS bit for it. That's one of the cheapest ways out...worked perfectly on my '06.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Will keep that in mind! Thanks for the great info. Had absolutely no clue about the JIS #3 screw in there. In all probability, would have tried to use my Philips if it had not been for you folks. :)
 

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If you were talking about "South Main Auto" (Eric O), then you should watch him do a couple Honda brake jobs. I used a Craftsman impact driver, with a regular phillips bit to get the screws out of the rotor before, and it worked fine. If that fails, a 1/4" drill bit will get the heads off those screws pretty quickly.
 

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The reason why those screws get stuck is because no anti-seize is ever used from the factory. Aluminum screwed into cast iron = rust over time. I use Vessel Impacta #3 JIS impact screw driver. If you use PH#3 bit on an impact driver, sometimes the bit will shatter or the screw gets stripped because Philips allows cam-outs and does not seat all the way in like a JIS screwdriver can. I attempted this on an old Acura TL and shattered two different PH#3 impact grade bits. Honestly, Philips is probably the worst type of screw to be used anywhere and it shouldn't have even been invented. A torx screw does not cam out either and allows for max force transfer. Once you take those screws out, always screw them back in with anti-seize. You do not necessarily need to screw them back in, however, you will hear click sounds sometimes when stopping or starting to move in reverse even with the wheels clamping on the rotors. So put those screws back in, but with anti-seize then you'll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you were talking about "South Main Auto" (Eric O), then you should watch him do a couple Honda brake jobs. I used a Craftsman impact driver, with a regular phillips bit to get the screws out of the rotor before, and it worked fine. If that fails, a 1/4" drill bit will get the heads off those screws pretty quickly.
What luck that you mentioned Craftsman. I just ordered their impact driver and got a good deal on it for 100 USD with a battery pack. Looks like I now need to get some JIS #3 impact bits or the screwdriver itself. :)

Vessel Impacta #3 JIS impact screw driver
Is this the Vessel Impacta #3 that you are talking about (also the one @Ziyang) linked above? I will go ahead and order that once you folks confirm that is the #3. I see a +3, but not sure if that is the same as the #3.
 

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Is this the Vessel Impacta #3 that you are talking about (also the one @Ziyang) linked above? I will go ahead and order that once you folks confirm that is the #3. I see a +3, but not sure if that is the same as the #3.
Yes it is. But based on my experience this screwdriver didn’t work very well. I smashed a hammer on it for 1 hour but didn’t work for left rear, although the right rear readily came off...

A JIS#3 screw bit on impact driver is more capable, since your rotor screw is rusted for 7 years...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes it is. But based on my experience this screwdriver didn’t work very well. I smashed a hammer on it for 1 hour but didn’t work for left rear, although the right rear readily came off...

A JIS#3 screw bit on impact driver is more capable, since your rotor screw is rusted for 7 years...
Getting both. I guess it is worthwhile just to have a non-power tool handy. :) Also, just curious, why seven years? I have had rotors resurfaced once and replaced once, so wouldn't they have come off for that? I am also assuming the mechanic put them back on (I still have not gotten my wheels off to check if they are there). :)
 

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Getting both. I guess it is worthwhile just to have a non-power tool handy. :) Also, just curious, why seven years? I have had rotors resurfaced once and replaced once, so wouldn't they have come off for that? I am also assuming the mechanic put them back on (I still have not gotten my wheels off to check if they are there). :)
Oh I assume you are the first owner and haven’t done anything for it before. If as you stated, the screw might not be there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@t-rd: I spoke to an agent at CarID, and apparently Centric does not make high carbon rotors any more (don't shoot the messenger, that's what I was told). He gave me an alternate EBC rotor set, which cost around 280 USD for all 4 wheels. I still need to spend another 100 USD on Akebono pads. Do you have any suggestions for more budget friendly rotors? Those look like ultra-premium to me, and I am wondering if they are even worth it, for my driving.
 

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I've got Raybestos in the front and Brembos in the rear with OEM pads in my 2008.

I got the CRAFTSMAN Automotive Tool Set Item #1048792 Model #CMMT14104 from Lowes to drive out the rotor screws. Worked like a charm and cost $20

I also got a runout dial indicator off eBay to check for rotor lateral runout

So far so good. I've had no complaints after 7K miles
 
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