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2011 Accord EX-L, 4 cyl, 60k miles
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all,

Since it's set to be minus 20 or so next week, I ordered a Honda block heater, which I plan to install this weekend.

I looked into the installation, seems like the hardest part will be removing the coolant drain port on the backside of the engine, 10mm hex insert on the plug.

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I suppose I'll soak it with PB blaster beforehand, and maybe hit with my impact wrench? Or is that risking issues with cracking the block or something?

Curious about thoughts and experiences.

Thanks,
 

V6 Supremacist 馃槑
Victus - 2012 Honda Accord (EX-L V6)
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I don't think those plugs are really known for being very difficult to remove.
 
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Cruising in Montana
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The instructions say to remove the engine block drain? That seems unlikely as the block heater, on my 7th gen anyhow, was pretty high on the block, on the right rear side. (2.4 engine)

I imagine just draining the radiator is all you'd need to do.
 

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2011 Accord EX-L, 4 cyl, 60k miles
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, right rear, fairly high. They call it a drain plug, and I read elsewhere it is installed with red loctite? Here's a graphic from similar install instructions.
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Fellow V6 Supremacist following the WiiMaster
Pair of 8th Gen Sedans - V6 & I4
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As I think about it, I suspect it'd more likely be a thread sealant instead of red loctite, wouldn't it?
Yes! Red threadlocker (Loctite or Permatex) is for fasteners you want to stay put and have no real plans of ever removing.

I've used Permatex p/n 59214 with full success on threaded plugs requiring a torque value. About $7 for the small 0.20 fl oz tube at Advance Auto Parts or O'Reilly Auto Parts. Just keep it in the refrigerator when you're not using it, and it will last for years.
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Withstands high temps (up to 400掳F), so if it's for the plug or a block heater, it will still do its job.

OF
 

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2011 Accord EX-L, 4 cyl, 60k miles
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the product info, that looks like a good idea when I install the block heater. That looks to me like something the factory would use.

I guess what I was getting at was- I've seen a number of threads on this site and elsewhere talking about those plugs being hard to remove, having "red loctite" on them, and requiring a breaker bar or cheater pipe to remove them:

1). what are the odds of removing red loctite on a 28 mm diameter threaded plug with a mere 10mm hex and a breaker bar? Wouldn't the torque required either snap the hex off, or crack the block? Usually red loctite is used on smaller fasteners like head bolts, right?

2). why would the factory use "red loctite" when what they primarily want is sealing the threads from leaking..and maybe a little locking type action (if they are straight threads, or even NPT, they will leak without pipe dope/teflon tape/sealant of some sort.
 

Fellow V6 Supremacist following the WiiMaster
Pair of 8th Gen Sedans - V6 & I4
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I've removed coolant drain bolts on Honda aluminum blocks before (both V6 and I4). I can't recall if any of them even had thread sealant on them, but I do recall that they weren't particularly difficult to remove.

Last one I removed was on our 2002 EX when I decided to do a full coolant service, and IIRC I did need a breaker bar ... not because of the torque, but on that V6 it was just so hard to reach, and I didn't have a good position for mechanical advantage.

OF
 

Cruising in Montana
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Yep, right rear, fairly high. They call it a drain plug,
Oooh, I get it now. The plug you need to remove is where the heater will go, so yes, you do need to remove it. :)

To me, a drain plug would be on the bottom of the engine.

Find out what size hex it is and maybe get one of these for your socket wrench. Then you should be able to put some force on it. (You can get them individually at most places, I'm too lazy to look that up) They're metric of course.

Husky 3/8 in. Drive SAE Hex Bit Socket Set (7-Piece) H3DSAE7PCHBS-02 - The Home Depot
 

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2011 Accord EX-L, 4 cyl, 60k miles
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Find out what size hex it is and maybe get one of these for your socket wrench. Then you should be able to put some force on it. (You can get them individually at most places, I'm too lazy to look that up) They're metric of course.

Husky 3/8 in. Drive SAE Hex Bit Socket Set (7-Piece) H3DSAE7PCHBS-02 - The Home Depot
Yeah, I plan to actually get a 1/2 drive impact set like that, so I can use the breaker bar and/or stubby impact wrench if things get really out of hand.....
 

8th Gen Believer
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only experience I had with them was on an old Mercedes turbo deisel. It was a permanent install with the female plug hanging near the radiator.
 
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