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http://www.autotrader.com/research/...3/2013-honda-accord-sport-real-world-test.jsp

(Ran a search. Found nothing. Forgive me if this has already been discussed.)

Question: Is the Accord Sport suspension different from the LX or EX suspension?

According to the article above, it is:

Functionally, the most obvious trait of the Accord Sport is the quicker steering. It's noticeable even as I wind my way through AutoTrader's 6-level parking garage. Slight inputs give quick and precise responses. If you like slow, lazy steering, you won't like the steering on this Honda Accord Sport. It's not that I really want to Autocross the new Accord, it's just that the more precise steering provides immediate feedback and makes me feel like I'm more involved in what's happening with the car.

Although, the Sport version of the 2013 Honda Accord is powered by the same 2.4 liter inline-four cylinder engine found in other Accords, in the Sport it's good for an extra 4 horsepower thanks to less restrictive exhaust. You can feel the extra power, but it's not dramatic. The Accord Sport also has a stiffer suspension, and that's obvious too. Versus the Accord EX or Touring, the Sport is sharper and more entertaining to drive.”


According to Honda.com the Sport does get a slightly quicker steering ratio, 2.46 turns lock-to lock verses 2.54 turns lock-to-lock for all other Accords. But can anyone confirm the stiffer suspension? I want to believe it but suspect this is incorrect.

According to Honda.com, the EX-L V6 gets slightly larger stabilizer bars – 19mm front /15 mm back verses 17/14 for all 2.4-liter Accord Sedans. (The 2.4 liter Coupes get 18/16 F/R stabilizer bars. The V6 Coupes get the 19/16 F/R bars.) As an aside, does it seem odd they did not use stiffer bars on the Sport Sedan?

Anyway, I’m curious about this suspension claim and would appreciate any confirmation. Thanks.
 

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http://www.autotrader.com/research/...3/2013-honda-accord-sport-real-world-test.jsp

(Ran a search. Found nothing. Forgive me if this has already been discussed.)

Question: Is the Accord Sport suspension different from the LX or EX suspension?
LX, Sport, and EX have the same front suspension part #s. The LX, Sport, and EX have the same rear springs part #s but different rear strut part #s. The stabilizer bars are different between the I4's and V6's.

sping // strut

LX

front: 51401-T2A-A01 (R), 51406-T2A-A01 (L) // 51611-T2A-315 (R), 51621-T2A-315 (L)
rear : 52441-T2A-A01 // 52611-T2A-A03

stab bar front: 51300-T2A-A01
stab bar rear : 52300-T2F-A11


Sport

front: 51401-T2A-A01 (R), 51406-T2A-A01 (L) // 51611-T2A-315 (R), 51621-T2A-315 (L)
rear : 52441-T2A-A01 // 52611-T2A-A03

stab bar front; 51300-T2A-A01
stab bar rear : 52300-T2F-A11


EX

front: 51401-T2A-A01 (R), 51406-T2A-A01 (L) // 51611-T2A-315 (R), 51621-T2A-315 (L)
rear : 52441-T2A-A01 // 52611-T2A-A13

stab bar front: 51300-T2A-A01
stab bar rear : 52300-T2F-A11


EX-L V6

front: 51401-T2B-A01 (R), 51406-T2B-A01 (L) // 51611-T2B-315 (R), 51621-T2B-315 (L)
rear : 52441-T2B-A01 // 52611-T2B-A03

stab bar front: 51300-T2B-A01
stab bar rear : 52300-T2G-A52




According to the article above, it is:

Functionally, the most obvious trait of the Accord Sport is the quicker steering. It's noticeable even as I wind my way through AutoTrader's 6-level parking garage. Slight inputs give quick and precise responses. If you like slow, lazy steering, you won't like the steering on this Honda Accord Sport. It's not that I really want to Autocross the new Accord, it's just that the more precise steering provides immediate feedback and makes me feel like I'm more involved in what's happening with the car.

Although, the Sport version of the 2013 Honda Accord is powered by the same 2.4 liter inline-four cylinder engine found in other Accords, in the Sport it's good for an extra 4 horsepower thanks to less restrictive exhaust. You can feel the extra power, but it's not dramatic. The Accord Sport also has a stiffer suspension, and that's obvious too. Versus the Accord EX or Touring, the Sport is sharper and more entertaining to drive.”


According to Honda.com the Sport does get a slightly quicker steering ratio, 2.46 turns lock-to lock verses 2.54 turns lock-to-lock for all other Accords. But can anyone confirm the stiffer suspension? I want to believe it but suspect this is incorrect.

According to Honda.com, the EX-L V6 gets slightly larger stabilizer bars – 19mm front /15 mm back verses 17/14 for all 2.4-liter Accord Sedans. (The 2.4 liter Coupes get 18/16 F/R stabilizer bars. The V6 Coupes get the 19/16 F/R bars.) As an aside, does it seem odd they did not use stiffer bars on the Sport Sedan?

Anyway, I’m curious about this suspension claim and would appreciate any confirmation. Thanks.

I'm going to say that the "stiffer suspension" they're feeling is actually the larger wheels. Remember that the Sport comes with 18" wheels with 45 profile tires vs the 16" with 65 profile tires on the LX and 17" with 55 profile tires on EX and higher trims.

As for the "sharper and more entertaining to drive,” I'm going to say it's because of the Sports better and wider Michelin Primacy MXM4 tires. The LX comes with either Firestone Affinity Touring or Continental ContiProContact tires while EX and higher trims come with either Michelin Primacy MXV4 or Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max tires.

Tires alone can and do make a big difference in a cars handling.
 

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Fail Zero bcg
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every tire has a different sidewall flex characteristic and will make the car feel different my sport came with the Goodyear LS2's which are quiet but overall grip they are lacking compared to a BFG comp2 or a performance summer tire.
 

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Going from memory, I believe the springs have different part numbers. If so the Sport's might be stiffer, but it would be odd that the strut numbers (and damping) would remain the same with stiffer springs.
 

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Going from memory, I believe the springs have different part numbers. If so the Sport's might be stiffer, but it would be odd that the strut numbers (and damping) would remain the same with stiffer springs.
As I noted above, springs all have the same part #s.
 

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You would be wrong. I looked this up when this was discussed in the past.
The rear shocks are different between the (LX, Sport) and (EX, EX-L) and (EX-L V6, Touring).
The front and rear springs are different between the 4 cylinder trim levels and 6 cylinder trim levels.
Even within your own post you have different rear shock part numbers, yet you say that they are all the same. Read your own post.

Rear shock absorbers, 3 different part numbers

LX - 52611-T2A-A03
Sport - 52611-T2A-A03
EX - 52611-T2A-A13
EX-L - 52611-T2A-A13
EX-L V6 - 52611-T2B-A03
Touring - 52611-T2B-A03

Rear springs, 2 different part numbers

LX - 52441-T2A-A01
Sport - 52441-T2A-A01
EX - 52441-T2A-A01
EX-L - 52441-T2A-A01
EX-L V6 - 52441-T2B-A01
Touring - 52441-T2B-A01

Front left spring, 2 different part numbers

LX - 51406-T2A-A11
Sport - 51406-T2A-A11
EX - 51406-T2A-A11
EX-L - 51406-T2A-A11
EX-L V6 - 51406-T2B-A01
Touring - 51406-T2B-A01

Front right spring, 2 different part numbers

LX - 51401-T2A-A11
Sport - 51401-T2A-A11
EX - 51401-T2A-A11
EX-L - 51401-T2A-A11
EX-L V6 - 51401-T2B-A01
Touring - 51401-T2B-A01

Front left strut, 2 different part numbers

LX - 51621-T2A-315
Sport - 51621-T2A-315
EX - 51621-T2A-315
EX-L - 51621-T2A-315
EX-L V6 - 51621-T2B-315
Touring - 51621-T2B-315

Front right strut, 2 different part numbers

LX - 51611-T2A-315
Sport - 51611-T2A-315
EX - 51611-T2A-315
EX-L - 51611-T2A-315
EX-L V6 - 51611-T2B-315
Touring - 51611-T2B-315
 

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Whoops. Must've been looking at the wrong row or something. Guess I should have formatted it like you did for easier comparing. Post corrected above.

So that means the LX and Sport suspensions are the same based on part #s. Why would the LX and Sport have stiffer suspension than the EX? Doesn't make sense. I'm still going to say it's the 18" wheels.

I could understand the V6 models having higher spring rates and damping since it's a heavier car. But it doesn't make sense that the LX and Sport would have the same set up. The part #s aren't telling the whole story.
 

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Whoops. Must've been looking at the wrong row or something. Guess I should have formatted it like you did for easier comparing. Post corrected above.

So that means the LX and Sport suspensions are the same based on part #s. Why would the LX and Sport have stiffer suspension than the EX?
Sportier cars tend to have stiffer suspensions. That's where the "Sport" comes into play for the "Sport" trim level.

LX may have it for the sake of cost cutting.
 

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144ci of Japanese Muscle!
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As for the "sharper and more entertaining to drive,” I'm going to say it's because of the Sports better and wider Michelin Primacy MXM4 tires. The LX comes with either Firestone Affinity Touring or Continental ContiProContact tires while EX and higher trims come with either Michelin Primacy MXV4 or Goodyear Assurance Fuel Max tires.
I doubt there's a large difference between the two Michelins aside from sizing. They're both what The Tire Rack refers to as "Grand Touring All Season" tires, and even Michelin's own site doesn't show any remarkable differences between the two, referring to them both as "Luxury Performance Touring". The MXM's are geared more towards "European"/luxury sedans/coupes and are available primarily in aspect ratios of 45-55 with H or V speed ratings. The MXV's are aimed more at "regular" cars/minivans primarily in aspect ratios of 55-65 and also in H or V speed ratings. FWIW, the treadwear ratings of the two tires in the 18" size for the Sport are 500 vs. 620 (the latter being a 245/45-18 as it's not offered in 235/45-18). It appears the biggest difference between the two is that the MXV is more long-lived and better in the snow, the MXM offering slightly more grip, but the differences are going to be very, very small. The user reviews of the two tires on The Tire Rack even group them very close to each other, ranking them 4th and 6th in the category.

The basic point to be made here is that it's more the tire SIZE that makes a difference with the sport, not the model of tire itself. They're so similar that I doubt anyone short of a professional driver would know the difference between the two (in the same size on the same wheel) under all but the most extreme circumstances, except for detail differences between the two in terms of noise and traction in wet or snow (where the MXV is supposedly superior).

And, of course, there is an alternate tire on the Sport that some have had fitted as OE, I believe it's the Goodyear LS-2. Now THAT would be a big difference, if my own experience with the LS-2 is anything to go by. The Goodyear is a piece of garbage by comparison. It is ranked 26th in the category on TTR, or just barely out of last place.

Why would the LX and Sport have stiffer suspension than the EX? Doesn't make sense. I'm still going to say it's the 18" wheels.
A different part number doesn't necessarily mean that it's stiffer... it's just DIFFERENT.

My initial thought was that maybe the LX and the Sport would have different rear shocks/springs because they were lighter than the more uplevel 4cyl models, but this doesn't hold up... even with less equipment, the Sport is slightly HEAVIER than an EX. It is lighter than an EX-L, but by so little that it wouldn't make any sense for there to be different suspension parts. The difference between an LX and an EX-L is only 100lbs (when comparing two cars with like transmissions).
 

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Sportier cars tend to have stiffer suspensions. That's where the "Sport" comes into play for the "Sport" trim level.

LX may have it for the sake of cost cutting.
I have a hard time believing cost cutting is the reason. If it was, Honda would have used the non-sporty rear suspension of the EX and EX-L on the LX.

Then there's the issue with the LX, Sport, EX and EX-L sharing the same front suspension. If Honda took the time and money to develop a non-sporty rear suspension for the EX and EX-L, then they would have done so for the front too. Honda wouldn't half arse it and go half and half.

Plus, why would Honda put a sporty suspension up front on the EX and EX-L like on the LX and Sport and then use a non-sporty rear suspension? The handling of the car would become unbalanced. Does it make sense that the lower trimmed LX would have a better/sportier suspension than the higher trimmed EX and EX-L?

I'm going to say that the Sport trim isn't really sporty except in its appearance.
 

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I have a hard time believing cost cutting is the reason. If it was, Honda would have used the non-sporty rear suspension of the EX and EX-L on the LX.

Then there's the issue with the LX, Sport, EX and EX-L sharing the same front suspension. If Honda took the time and money to develop a non-sporty rear suspension for the EX and EX-L, then they would have done so for the front too. Honda wouldn't half arse it and go half and half.

Plus, why would Honda put a sporty suspension up front on the EX and EX-L like on the LX and Sport and then use a non-sporty rear suspension? The handling of the car would become unbalanced. Does it make sense that the lower trimmed LX would have a better/sportier suspension than the higher trimmed EX and EX-L?

I'm going to say that the Sport trim isn't really sporty except in its appearance.
That is if you are assuming that the front suspension is 'sporty'.

I'm sure Honda knows what they are doing.

Everything about suspension tuning and different suspension parts is pure assumption. We don't know what the differences are.

You could perhaps think about it this way.

The front suspension is standard, not sporty, not soft, just normal. The rear suspension is setup is little sportier for the 'Sport' trim level and for whatever reason the LX trim level as well.

Even though this is a 'Sport' trim level, it is built for the masses, for the people. So the standard suspension may make sense in that regard. They can't make it too sporty (stiff), that would maybe deter some buyers.
 

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A different part number doesn't necessarily mean that it's stiffer... it's just DIFFERENT.
Yeah, that I know. I was saying stiffer because that's what the autotrader reviewer wrote.

Although, the Sport version of the 2013 Honda Accord is powered by the same 2.4 liter inline-four cylinder engine found in other Accords, in the Sport it's good for an extra 4 horsepower thanks to less restrictive exhaust. You can feel the extra power, but it's not dramatic. The Accord Sport also has a stiffer suspension, and that's obvious too.
And if the Sport does have a stiffer suspension than the other trims, based on part #s, the LX would have to have the same "stiffer" suspension as the Sport, hence my question of "Why would the LX and Sport have stiffer suspension than the EX?"
 

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It's the tires. It's really that simple... no conspiracy. Promise. :)
Run a stiffer tire and the car will feel very different. Our Touring with 18's + summer tires feel much stiffer, but the suspension remains the same.
 

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"Stiffer" or not, this suspension feels like a Buick compared to my old cars. :dunno: But I think I remember Car and Driver mentioning a stiffer suspension on their Sport test car. I'm too tired to go look it up right now, time for bed.
 

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In Honda's marketing material, it mentions a 'Sportier' suspension for the Sport trim level. That's as much information as there is from Honda.
 

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And if the Sport does have a stiffer suspension than the other trims, based on part #s, the LX would have to have the same "stiffer" suspension as the Sport, hence my question of "Why would the LX and Sport have stiffer suspension than the EX?"
If indeed it IS stiffer, the only justification I can imagine is that the EX has more luxury features and may be tuned to appeal to people with a more luxurious backside.
 

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That is if you are assuming that the front suspension is 'sporty'.

I'm sure Honda knows what they are doing.

Everything about suspension tuning and different suspension parts is pure assumption. We don't know what the differences are.

You could perhaps think about it this way.

The front suspension is standard, not sporty, not soft, just normal. The rear suspension is setup is little sportier for the 'Sport' trim level and for whatever reason the LX trim level as well.

Even though this is a 'Sport' trim level, it is built for the masses, for the people. So the standard suspension may make sense in that regard. They can't make it too sporty (stiff), that would maybe deter some buyers.
Okay. So let's say the front suspension on the LX, Sport, EX, and EX-L isn't sporty (stiff) but normal and that the rear is sporty (stiff) on the LX and Sport trim only. Again, why use the sporty (stiff) rear suspension of the Sport on the LX when Honda has the non-sporty (non-stiff) EX and EX-L rear suspension?
 

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It's the tires. It's really that simple... no conspiracy. Promise. :)
Run a stiffer tire and the car will feel very different. Our Touring with 18's + summer tires feel much stiffer, but the suspension remains the same.
That's what I think too. 18" wheels/tires will give a stiffer/firmer ride vs 16" and 17" wheels/tires.

I went from 16" and 17" wheels/tires to 18's and immediately noticed the difference, especially on bumpy roads and over expansion joints.

The wider tires on the 18's help to give it that sharper drive.
 

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Fail Zero bcg
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If indeed it IS stiffer, the only justification I can imagine is that the EX has more luxury features and may be tuned to appeal to people with a more luxurious backside.
when I sit in a EX the steering wheel feels like cheap plastic/rubber after griping the sport leather wheel . It also feels a little thicker I was set to purchase a 13 EX 6mt but decided on the sport as it just handled better and had a more solid feel to it compared to the EX's 215/55 tires
 

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Okay. So let's say the front suspension on the LX, Sport, EX, and EX-L isn't sporty (stiff) but normal and that the rear is sporty (stiff) on the LX and Sport trim only. Again, why use the sporty (stiff) rear suspension of the Sport on the LX when Honda has the non-sporty (non-stiff) EX and EX-L rear suspension?
Logistics and supplies? Just a guess. :dunno:

Another guess... Generally when I think of a base trim level cars, I think it has the worst suspension. Not soft, not smooth, nothing special. Just standard. Some people perceive this standard suspension as stiff, harsh, and may think it's normal due to the base trim level.

This may cause them to think about getting higher trim level thus spending more money, especially after a test drive. Just a guess but I think most people looking at the LX will likely look at the EX if they wanted to go up a trim level. The 'Sport' has its own niche market.

They test drive the EX and it feels a tad softer. They buy that instead cause it feels more comfortable and they end up spending more money. Just a guess though.
 
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