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Discussion Starter #1
Well, spent the late afternoon, about 3 hours, working on the car. Had the airbox and battery out, throttle body all nice and clean and ATF drained down below. Was about to remove the bolt which holds the oil jet kit in place when I realized I didn't have my 3/8" tubing funnel. I made it years ago while living in NY. Must not have brought it with me. Ended up spending close to an hour searching for a alternative. Had the 3/8" tubing, but no funnel small enough to fit. Finally it dawned on me. Heatshrink wrap. Dug through a junk box, found the box of heatshrink tubing and went to work. Turned out better than my original contraption, which I must admit was quite ghetto.

Moral of the story, know how you plan on getting the ATF back into the tranny before you drain (and no the dipstick wasn't an option). There isn't much room to maneuver, even with the airbox out. FYI Lowe's sells these great plastic buckets with measurements on the sides. Took out 3 qts. exactly and I didn't spill a drop (made another contraption to keep the fluid off the frame). I changed the fluid 30,000 miles ago and it needed to be changed. Bolt was clean though (I've never seen any shavings on the bolt ever).

So all in all, I figure I saved myself about $550 today between the mounts I replaced, fluids replaced, air filter, cabin filter, and throttle body removal and cleaning. Oh, and one more thing. If you decide to remove the TB, don't forget the gasket. You know your gonna need it. Ain't gonna come off in one piece.

I shudder to think of those poor '03 & '04 V6's running around waiting for 120k to change the fluid. Bet not many tranny's ever see 120k without a fluid change.

It goes without saying, I wouldn't have been able to do any of this without this community. Thank you.
 

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glad you got figured out...hate that feeling sometimes when you take out a tool and your out and about somewhere and that specific tool you need is not in the car

i'm like you and will improvise
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Won't use the dipstick because of the size of the hole. Like filling it through a pee-hole. I fill through the fill hole. Yes, I've got to remove the oil jet kit, which is a nuisance, (one 10mm or 12mm bolt, I believe, but I use a 3' extension with a swivel) but I like to check around down there anyway once in a while. I try to do it without unclipping anything from the fuse box which makes it even more of a challenge, which is why I loved my original "fill-funnel-tube" thing I made in NY. No worries, as I frankensteined another one together. Except this one has a smaller funnel so I need to pour slowly.

I like watching the cough syrup red fluid going through the hose.
 

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For readers: Most members here re-fill their automatic transmission fluid (ATF) through the dipstick tube. Believe it or not, the 4 cylinder's ATF dipstick tube is LARGER than the 6 cylinder's ATF dipstick tube.

With the 4 cylinder dipstick tube, you can use a long thin funnel to re-fill- which is what I use. Takes about 3 minutes to add 3 quarts of fluid.

With the smaller tube on the V6 engine, it will take you longer, and you will usually have to "MacGuyver" a small funnel to a small diameter clear vinyl tube to re-fill. It will take more time to re-fill because of the narrower opening.

Nothing wrong with using the designated re-fill bolt though....just many find it easier to use the dipstick tube. It's not "right or wrong"- just a preference. If you change your ATF every year, loosening that bolt will be a piece of cake- and re-filling will be very fast.

Manual transmission owners still have to replace their fluid. Draining is easy, but re-filling does require loosening a re-fill bolt as there is no dipstick on 7th Gen Accords with manual transmissions. OP has a good point here, especially for them. There are a few horror stories where manual transmission guys drain the fluid, THEN try to open the re-fill bolt but can't- either because of rust, improper tools, or no strength. Not a good feeling to have on a Saturday afternoon....

Always know your exit strategy before you even walk in the room!
 

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Many use the dipstick hole on the V6 because they think the ATF filler cap requires a rental he-man to loosen. This is the true the first time, but not thereafter. Just use a breaker bar + extension and 17mm socket.
 

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Is there a filler cap on the 4cyl? I always use the dipstick tube, and a short small funnel. Then, I make sure to be extra careful to not spill it while i'm pouring it down to the funnel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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Discussion Starter #10
Many use the dipstick hole on the V6 because they think the ATF filler cap requires a rental he-man to loosen. This is the true the first time, but not thereafter. Just use a breaker bar + extension and 17mm socket.
My AT has the jet kit so the bolt holding the bracket wasn't that bad the first time. As it's installed by the dealer, it's not impossible to crack open. I find the ATF drain bolt to be much harder to crack open, especially without lifting the car, which is how I like to do it. No real room to get leverage on ratchet and no room for breaker bar. Pure arm and hand strength on that one. Took me three tries, but she broke. Just glad can't strip the bolt as it's a female 3/8".
 

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I've said this before also, and it can't be repeated enough. Don't drain the fluid out of your transmission, until you know how you are going to get the new fluid in. The first time I drained the fluid I had to hold on to the front of the car with both hands, and push the breaker-bar with my foot to get the drain bolt loose. Still that was nothing compared to that crazy tight bolt holding the crank pulley on, when I did the timing belt. They must over-torque these bolts at the factory. The opposite is true with the spark plugs and the pressure switches on the transmission. You can almost take those out without a ratchet.
 

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I've said this before also, and it can't be repeated enough. Don't drain the fluid out of your transmission, until you know how you are going to get the new fluid in. The first time I drained the fluid I had to hold on to the front of the car with both hands, and push the breaker-bar with my foot to get the drain bolt loose. Still that was nothing compared to that crazy tight bolt holding the crank pulley on, when I did the timing belt. They must over-torque these bolts at the factory. The opposite is true with the spark plugs and the pressure switches on the transmission. You can almost take those out without a ratchet.
I had to take my old civic to a mechanic to get him to loosen the crank bolt. He broke a socket trying to loosen it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've said this before also, and it can't be repeated enough. Don't drain the fluid out of your transmission, until you know how you are going to get the new fluid in. The first time I drained the fluid I had to hold on to the front of the car with both hands, and push the breaker-bar with my foot to get the drain bolt loose. Still that was nothing compared to that crazy tight bolt holding the crank pulley on, when I did the timing belt. They must over-torque these bolts at the factory. The opposite is true with the spark plugs and the pressure switches on the transmission. You can almost take those out without a ratchet.
Yeah, that drain bolt gets damn hot and makes for a difficult time getting it off. I believe that's why Honda made it a female socket vs a male. A male would strip way before that bolt came loose. I was grabbing the hot radiator (probably not a great idea) to get leverage and it still took me three times. I was about to step on it when it finally gave in. It's all about leverage. If you don't jack the car, you've got none, except the strength of your arm and grip. And yes, PLEASE know how you're gonna add fluid BEFORE you drain it. Can't be overstated. Unless of course, you have a second car handy, or a Home Depot within walking distance. I use a funnel with a thin drain into 3/8" tubing. Also AZ sells one that will work and they have it in stock.

BLCKFLSH, I am amazed you tried to get the crank bolt off without an impact wrench. I don't think I've ever heard of it coming loose without power tools or bumping the starter.
 

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BLCKFLSH, I am amazed you tried to get the crank bolt off without an impact wrench. I don't think I've ever heard of it coming loose without power tools or bumping the starter.
Oh, I had a brand new Ingersol Rand 1/2" drive 550ftlb impact wrench I bought right before I did the timing belt. I also had a huge breaker-bar, but that only served to mangle the pulley holding tool. I had to go down the street to where I work, and borrow the 1" drive impact to get the crank bolt out. The 1" drive impact probably weighs 100 pounds, but it got the bolt out.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Oh, I had a brand new Ingersol Rand 1/2" drive 550ftlb impact wrench I bought right before I did the timing belt. I also had a huge breaker-bar, but that only served to mangle the pulley holding tool. I had to go down the street to where I work, and borrow the 1" drive impact to get the crank bolt out. The 1" drive impact probably weighs 100 pounds, but it got the bolt out.
Wow. That's crazy. Can you bump start Accords?
 

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At the risk of screwing up the starter, or worse, the flywheel, I would rather not try using the starter to remove the crank bolt. I guess if I were desperate, but I had other choices.

 
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