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Ok folks, I've managed to pull 70K from my 2017 HAH Touring with the factory tires. Clearly I drive conservatively and between city & highway driving I average 45mpg tank after tank.

I don't hate the Energy Savers (and have had no problems with them) but I really want to replace them with something a little more reassuring for the few times we get winter weather here in Atlanta. Obviously that is sporadic and infrequent, but I do travel to the mountains in the winter sometimes and I want to feel the safest I can when I have to drive in it.

I'm considering the Michelin Crossclimate+ (50K), or the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack (80K). Both the Quiettrack & Crossclimate get great ratings, far better than the Energy Saver, but what I'm concerned about is the hit I may take to my fuel economy.

Can anyone provide feedback on what differences you experienced if you put non low-rolling tires on your hybrid, and if so, how much? And if you have a tire recommendation that I didn't mention, by all means, please throw it out there. Thanks!


 

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Can anyone provide feedback on what differences you experienced if you put non low-rolling tires on your hybrid, and if so, how much? And if you have a tire recommendation that I didn't mention, by all means, please throw it out there. Thanks!
I have a 9th gen with a V6. With the original Goodyear assurance fuel max tires, I managed to get 41 mpg on a 150 mile trip that was mostly highway. (I made every effort to drive efficiently to see what mpg I could get on that drive) I did not like the dry or wet traction of those tires. I did like the gas mileage. To me, safety comes first, so I replaced them with Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS Ultra High Performance All Season Tires. Not only are these tires not low-rolling resistance, every comparison test I’ve read shows they consistently rate worst in the fuel mileage category.

with that said, I probably get 2-3 MPG less than I did on average with the OEM’s. To me, better traction and stopping distances in both dry and especially wet conditions are a fair trade off for the extra $50-75 a year I now spend on gas.
 

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I replaced the stock tires with Michelin Premier A/S. Handling is heads and tails better; no squealing around sharp turns and much better in rain and snow.
That said, I did take a significant hit to the tune of 4 MPG or more. I keep complete Fuelly records and have driven the same commute for 7 years, so there's no disputing it. However, I feel much safer with the handling (even rain was scary on the OEM tires as they wore) and can live with the hit.

I'll try to post my Fuelly link tomorrow.

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I've used Goodyear Assurance Comfortred Touring on my other vehicles including two Accords and didn't notice a drop in MPG. I plan on replacing '17 HAH OEMs soon and anticipate a 1-2 mpg drop. The Comfortreds are really quiet and absorb a lot of the road issues, definitely not a racer tire but does improve ride and handling. My only issue is every Honda I've put them on, I had to get them balanced at the dealership. Seems like the independents work off a different spec or just my luck with shoddy work.
 

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You only want to use a Hunter Roadforce balancer for balancing; it applies road-force pressure to the tire while balancing as it's name infers.

I went from a yearly average MPG of 48.5 on the OEM tires to 45.4 on the new Michelin Premier A/S.

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