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Here's Dan Neil's review of the 8th Generation, back when he was still writing for the LA Times. Fans of the 8th Gen are gonna go "ouch", but even if you don't entirely agree with the review, it is really funny, and it has some valid criticisms of the 8th Gen's looks and mechanicals.

And yes, I am a fan of the 9th Gen 4-doors. I bought a 6MT Sport, which looks and drives great.

Dad's new dreamboat

The beloved Accord sedan gets a middle-age makeover. But it seems to have lost a step.

September 05, 2007|DAN NEIL

I was sitting at a red light when they rolled up beside me, the guy riding his Suzuki Do-Me 8000 with his hot female companion on the back, her thongage pouring out of her low-rise jeans. Her blond hair fell from beneath the helmet and fluffed weightlessly in the hot breeze. Her skintight ballistic-armor motorcycle jacket was unzipped down to her navel. It's a good look, I guess, if you go in for that sort of thing.

As I sat there in the Amana-white 2008 Honda Accord EX-L sedan, she looked over at me. I knew what she was thinking. I knew she wanted me.

And why wouldn't she? The Honda Accord ska-reams confirmed heterosexual, and not in a Larry Craig way, either. This car ought to be issued with a complimentary pair of relaxed-fit dad jeans. Every male owner should get a free BlackBerry, which is like monogamy's ankle bracelet. To own this car is to be possessed with an inexplicable urge to trim hedges. While other cars suggest the owner is still working out issues -- experimenting, if you will -- the Accord sedan says, "Hey, I'm past all that. I'm a smoldering volcano of straight suburban love, and I accept it."

For Accord-driving women, the message is related but different: "My husband likes girls."

At this point, I could tell you all about the new, eighth-generation Accord (sedan and coupe, four- and six-cylinder engines), giving you the usual technical walk-around. It's bigger inside and out, more powerful and more fuel efficient, more generously equipped with cabin amenities and standard safety gear. The technology on board -- active noise cancellation, hyper-clean emissions control, available voice-activated nav and audiophile sound systems -- is worthy of a car in the next tax bracket. The sedan goes on sale next Wednesday, and the Coupe hits the dealer lots Sept. 20. Pricing is between $20,000 and $30,000. Honda sticks the landing, as usual.

But the Accord is not just any car. This is one of the bestselling import-nameplate cars of all time, the beloved and dead-reliable vehicular helpmate of millions of American families. After nearly three decades on the market, the Accord is an institution, like the Federal Reserve or the missionary position. What you really want to know is, what does it mean?

It means that, if you buy this car, you're probably from a multi-Honda family. It means that at some point in your life, you turned the key of an Accord, it turned right over and you thought, "My God, you can't kill these cars" (one of the biggest factors in Honda buyers' consideration is "DQR" -- durability, quality and reliability). It means that, either by income or temperament, you're solidly middle-class, modest, married. The Accord is automotive Presbyterianism.

It also might mean that you're getting older. The median age of Accord buyers has gradually moved upward (from 41 in 1995 to 50 in 2005) as the car's sales have been carried along by a grateful, aging clientele. That demographic migration is reflected in the car's design and engineering. It's conspicuously quieter, more refined, less demanding and safer, both in the sense of crash tests and in its styling.

What does the Accord mean? It might mean that you're getting broad of beam, Bud. The 2008 Accord sedan is significantly larger than the outgoing model -- 3 inches longer, 2.3 inches more wheelbase and almost an inch taller -- and the interior is gawdamighty huge, a full 120 cubic feet, which puts this midsize car in the Environmental Protection Agency's full-size category. The seats are broad and plush and well separated for more elbowroom, or for massively overburdened hips. It's difficult to reverse engineer the cabin and conclude that it's not designed for America's barons of the buffet.

As for personality, this is how Honda characterizes its target audience: sociable and outgoing, success-driven, intelligent and value savvy. Uh-huh. This meeting of the Pasadena Rotarians will now come to order.

Actually, here is where I think the new Accord comes off its well-oiled tracks a bit. The Accords I've driven in the past have all been pretty fun, light and quick to the helm, a little feisty. Indeed, by Honda's own reckoning, the fun-to-drive factor is a key differentiator between the Accord and the stolid Toyota Camry.

But I must say, the new Accord sedan won't make anyone laugh those roller-coaster laughs. I drove the EX-L with the 3.5-liter V6 engine, which is, granted, an amazing lump of technology. This super-clean motor (PZEV rated with the five-speed automatic) has Honda's Variable Cylinder Management (VCM), which shuts down cylinders during periods of light load, running the car on four and even three cylinders as conditions warrant. That helps the car achieve 19/29, city/highway mileage.

The engine puts out a respectable 268 hp, which ought to be enough to move the 3,616-pound car pretty well; however, something in the computer logic of the drive-by-wire throttle seems amiss. I had to utterly cane this car to get it to go fast, and there just didn't seem to be much in the way of mid-range torque available.

Curiously, the new Accord Coupe, when equipped with a six-speed manual transmission, has an additional variable intake manifold and two intake cam profiles to make the 248 pound-feet of torque more palpable. Maybe that hardware should be generalized to the rest of the Accord V6 line.

Otherwise, the Accord is chapter-and-verse Honda, front-wheel drive with double A-arm front suspension and multi-links in the rear. The ride is well damped and quiet, although the suspension feels fairly lax in high-energy maneuvering. There's considerable body roll, even though the car has a higher roll center and a lower center of gravity than the previous model. Honda talks about its new variable-rate steering for solid on-center feel, but on center, the Accord's steering feel is as numb as a phantom limb. It does have a quick overall rack ratio, however (2.56 turns, lock to lock).

And then there's the styling. You know, styling is subjective and I don't want to pound this well-wrought competent family sedan with a name so many hold dear. . . . Well, maybe I do. Holy cow, this car is ugly. In white, it looks like it was whittled out of a bar of prison soap.

See, that's the genius of it. A guy driving this car is so totally past needing to impress with a sleek, attractive automobile, or even one that's barely presentable. It's counter-programming. The man who owns this car has deep and unquenchable mojo. Women sense that sort of thing.

http://articles.latimes.com/2007/sep/05/autos/hy-neil5
:)
 

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Four Doors/Two Pedals
2020 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T 10AT
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Honestly, I like a car that says to the world that I'm old, stable, heterosexual, and married, even though I am not married.

I like that people might look down their noses at me for driving such a durable and reliable workhorse of a car--a grocery hauler, even. I like that it's so economical and that it has amenities that would have made it a luxury car just a few years ago.

I'm also glad I waited until the 9th generation was introduced to trade in my 7th.

I certainly don't have to flog my EX to get it to move out and even with McPherson struts, I like the way it takes corners without plowing through.

This numbness of steering that I read so much about, simply doesn't exist as far as I can tell, but then this seems to be mainly a complaint of V6 owners.

I can only assume that the review has some substance, as most of the complaints have been covered ad infinitum in the media.

Whatever the case may be with the 8th generation, I'm glad that the pundits are excited again about the Accord and I'm glad that the 9th generation is as much an improvement over the 7th generation as the 7th generation was an improvement over the 6th.

In other words, I feel that the 9th generation is a nice blend of the ho-hum and spunkiness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Grady, I had written a longer reply, which got erased because I wasn't logged in, but I basically agree with you. I think the 8th Gen was sub-standard in the looks department (both inside and out), and thus was destined to appeal mostly to people that had already purchased Accords or Civics before. I think the 9th Gen has pretty much solved that problem.
 

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"It is plain that anonymity has sometimes been [used] for the most constructive purposes." Hugo Black, Tally vs. California (1960).

Functional anonymity sells a lot of Accords.
 

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Thanks for posting. As someone that won't go back and read every page of long threads, I appreciate it.
 

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I had an 8th generation Accord EX 5M.

The engine would always blip the RMS between shifts, so you had to be careful to let off gas before pushing the clutch petal. The 9th generation with direct injection doesn't do the RPM blip.

Also, the seating position on the 8th generation for me required me to sit closer to the dashboard than I liked to be able to properly engage the clutch. The 9th generation has a much improved seat / clutch distance relationship in my view.

The seating / petal position, visibility, and great feel of being positioned and connected to the car when driving, and the great (correct?) feel on the 9th gen with 6 MT is super. It feels right. Some cars never will make you feel smug. The 9th does and it does it well. :thmsup:
 

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HAHAHA! Bloody good read.
 

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I don't really understand where all of the 8th gen hate comes from, at least from a styling standpoint. In the realm of family sedans, it's not as attractive as the new Mazda 6, Kia Optima or even the new Ford Fusion, but calling it ugly is more than a bit harsh. Bland and inoffensive? Definitely, especially compared to the Optima/Sonata, 6, and Fusion. Ugly? No way, as it's too plain-Jane to evoke such a hateful response. The only thing I can think of that I would personally categorize as ugly in a modern-day sedan is the Acura plenum grille as used on the 2009-2011 TL. Now that thing is offensive. The 8G Accord sedan is too sedate to create such strong feelings. I actually think that, as a whole, it's a pleasant-looking car. I'm not going to call it beautiful by any means, but it does have a few nice angles to it. The main complaints I have about it are the oversized headlamps, bland tail section (especially on pre-MMC models), and lack of integrated fog lamps on 4-cylinder models (the lower part of the front bumper looks so barren without them). Other than those few things, I think it's fine.

It's not like the 9th gen is perfect, either, and I find it almost laughable that someone could consider the 8th gen hideous but fall in love with the 9th gen. They look quite similar, really. To me, the 9th gen looks like a subtle evolution of the 8th gen that refines some of the details and fixes most of the issues that I had with the old car (though I do wish the fog lights didn't look so archaic for such a new model - they'd seriously be right at home on a 1993 Accord, but even that car's optional fog lights looked more modern). That said, the changes are indeed evolutionary and not enough to put the car up there with the Fusion, Optima/Sonata, or 6 in terms of beauty, in my honest opinion. In fact, and I hate to say this as I'm an avid Accord fan and I plan to buy a 9th gen in the near-future, but to me the 9th gen looked dated from Day One and there's no doubt in my mind that its similarity to the 8th gen has a lot to do with that. Still, I like the 8th gen, so I naturally like the 9th gen a bit more. I find its styling pleasing, if not beautiful. That said, the 7.5G remains my personal favorite bodystyle of the Accord sedans that I've owned, while the 4th and 5th gens are my all-time favorites.

I will agree that the 8th gen's interior is downright funky, especially for a Honda. The door panels are normal enough, but the dashboard has way too many shapes and bulges and as a whole is one big mess, IMO. It's functional, but looks extremely awkward. Really not sure what they were going for there. An evolution of the 7th gen's tasteful but simplistic interior design would've been much better. The 9th gen's interior is better for the most part. At least the dashboard has calmed down a bit. My biggest gripes are the asymmetry in the center stack and the odd design of the door panels. Seriously, why in the hell did Honda decide to stop the black strip on the top portion of the door panel so suddenly less than halfway across? It looks silly on cars with the gray or tan interior. Black hides it somewhat but you can still see the seam as clear as day. I wish they'd just followed the 5th, 7th and 8th gen tradition of having the top portion of the door panel extend across the entire length of the door for a nice clean two-tone appearance on cars with light interiors. Not a fan of the goofy-looking front headrests either, but the 8th gen suffers from the same affliction.

I honestly wish that I could just have the 7th gen's interior in a 9th's body. The 7th gen had the most comfortable seats and the best interior design and atmosphere in an Accord since the 5th gen, IMHO. Sitting in the 6th gen felt like sitting in a minivan, as the dash was low and long and you sat up really high in the interior. The 7th gen maintained the seat height of the 6th gen, but brought the dashboard upwards to eliminate that minivan feel while maintaining excellent visibility. The 8th gen is similar in terms of dashboard height, but I feel closer to the windshield and I can see the hood of the car clearly from the driver's seat. I couldn't see the hood at all in the 7th gen, or even the 6th gen. I don't like it. It also feels as if they pushed the front seats outward too much and too close to the door panels. I felt nicely centered in the left half of the 7th gen's interior while I feel as if I'm being pushed into the door panel in the 8th gen. As a result, the A pillar seems to be a lot more up-close-and-personal than it was in the 7th gen, where it wasn't in my direct line of sight as much. I don't understand why they would purposely move the front seats further from the center of the car, unless they just wanted to brag about how much extra space is between the front seats compared to the 7th gen (and they actually did brag about that when the car came out...LOL). After all, it's not like they gave it a bench seat option for the front, though they probably could have given the sheer width of the car and the fact that the front seating area is wider than the rear seat area by a good margin (look at the shoulder and hip room measurements of the front seat versus the rear, the difference is huge, roughly 2 inches in both measures). Imagine that, the 8th gen could've been the first 6-passenger Accord. It was classified as a Large car by the EPA, after all.

Unfortunately for me, the 9th gen continues the layout and feel of the 8th gen, only the reduced front headroom now has my hair touching the headliner :thumbsdow It's too bad Honda can't just remake the 7th gen with all of the updated safety and convenience features of the 9th gen. Call it the Accord Classic :tongue:

As far as driving dynamics, I can't comment on the 9th gen as I still haven't driven it, but I can compare the 6th, 7th, and 8th gens. The 6th gen (I had an '02 EX V6) had good steering feel but was let down by wimpy tires and a suspension that allowed lots of body roll yet was still firm enough to create a somewhat coarse ride (though those wimpy 205/65 tires surely helped muffle some of the harshness). Still, it would hang on fairly well in curves despite throwing me around with all of that body roll. The 7th gen (2007 V6) felt like a tightened-up version of the 6th gen. Its ride quality was definitely firmer and it demonstrated less body roll, but it also lost some of the 6th gen's direct steering feel in exchange for a more refined and isolated quality that was more akin to my 2000 Passat than the 6th gen. Ultimately, the 7th gen really didn't handle much, if any, better than the 6th gen. Cornering speeds were about the same, but the 7th gen just felt more solid and composed overall. The 8th gen is a relative mixed bag, as it somehow manages to out-handle its predecessors but feel totally awkward while doing so. Body roll has been reduced, but you're always aware of the car's size and heft in corners. The 6G and 7G always managed to feel smaller and lighter than they were, and would seem to shrink around me. Not this thing. It feels a lot less graceful than it actually is. Speaking of that, it's almost shocking how tossable the car is despite its girth. I find myself throwing it into corners with more confidence than I ever had in my previous Accords despite being ever-aware of the car's size. It feels planted and secure, which may even be attributable to that sense of size and weight. That said, I believe the biggest flaw in the 8th gen's handling is its overly-light and relatively numb steering. The path accuracy previous Accords were renowned for is still there, but the road feel has been diluted to the point where it's almost nonexistent. You can barely feel what's going on at the contact patches compared to previous generations (though I'm sure it's still among the best in the realm of affordable family cars). So, while the car has decent handling, the relatively lifeless steering and inability to mask its mass make it feel extremely uncomfortable with being pushed. The relative athleticism of past Accords is still there, it's just buried beneath a layer of isolation, a layer of fat, so to speak. It's as if the Accord itself has progressed into middle-age. As I said before, I've yet to drive a 9th gen, but I'm not expecting it to be much different. After all, it's still a midsize family sedan pointed the same target demographic it has been for years. It doesn't sound as if the steering is any better, but if the car goes back to feeling as light as the 7th gen did while maintaining the 8th gen's tossability, I'll be happy.
 

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Hey Dan Neil is a Trecky! The following is from his review of the 2013 Accord 4DR V6:

"Look, people who shop for family sedans are Vulcans, driven by logic, denying the temptations of emotion. They constitute a self-selected audience of the deeply reasonable and intensely practical. The new Accord will resonate with them. I predict it will live long and prosper."
 

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My next door neighbor has a gray 8th gen sedan and I have a gray 9th gen sedan. To the previous poster who mentioned they look very similar... that's true. I'll say this though... there's enough subtle design differences to separate them that makes the 9th gen look more along the lines of the classic Accord (7th gen on back). I think I remember reading somewhere that Honda brought back the designer, who designed the 90s model Accords for the 9th gen. I definitely get that vibe that the 9th gen is somewhat like a cross between a 5th and 6th gen. I prefer the looks of the 9th gen, but the massive difference is the interior. 9th gen TOTALLY blows away 8th gen. No contest. I actually liked the distinction the EPA gave the 8th gen... being classified as a full-size car... which leads me to my next thought.

As for the original article stating the average median age for the Accord has gone up... I definitely see that. There are more older people driving the sedan Accords than in years gone by. Especially 8th and 9th gen. It really comes down to this, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord has become the new Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis of the age. Having rode in a Mercury Grand Marquis most of my life and driving it eventually ('89 model though), a full-size car can be a great thing. I have the hardest time in the world accepting the Ford Taurus as the replacement for the Crown Vic. My one experience riding in a Taurus was horrid at best. How Ford could consider that the replacement for the Crown Vic just proves how messed up Ford has become. Which is part of the reason for jumping ship to Honda.

Essentially, the Camry and Accord have grown up and become the next generation of full-size cars (or close to it), while the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic have pretty much taken the place as the new midsize cars that the Camry and Accord used to be.

Tommy
 

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I dislike car "reviewers" who are really third-rate comedians. That review spent 50% of the words setting up a joke, 25% his sexual frustrations, and 25% was useful.
 

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Of course the average age of an Accord buyer has gone up because the price has gone up along with the girth. Additionally, younger people are moving to more urban neighborhoods and are getting along with public transportation or bicycles. I could have saved a couple of bucks buying a slightly used 8th Gen. but I hated the bloated looking exterior, especially the rear end. The interior of the 9th Gen. also looks better, but those are all subjective opinions.

I enjoyed reading the review and I appreciate a little humor. After all the Accord has become the preeminent suburban commuter car.
 

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"It is plain that anonymity has sometimes been [used] for the most constructive purposes." Hugo Black, Tally vs. California (1960).

Functional anonymity sells a lot of Accords.
One of the reasons I bought one. I get too much attention when driving my 911 and XJ6 and with the Accord I just blend in to the thousands of middle aged parents for whom the sedan was clearly designed. The police give my Accord nary a look.
 

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One of the reasons I bought one. I get too much attention when driving my 911 and XJ6 and with the Accord I just blend in to the thousands of middle aged parents for whom the sedan was clearly designed. The police give my Accord nary a look.
I just need the bumper sticker that says, "My Other Car is a Porsche". It's the impression that counts. Who cares what's really in your garage. :notworthy
 

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I drove my grandmother's 8th gen a few years ago, and while I think it's a nice car, I think the reviewer made some good points. Compared to my 7th gen, I found the steering overly light, and while the car handled well, it didn't feel sporty. It sounds like the 9th gen still has the light steering, but hopefully it drives in a more spirited, nimble way. The 8th gen interior also had noticeable signs of cost-cutting, but thankfully that has been remedied in the 9th gen (though I don't know why Honda left hard plastic on the part of the door panel where you'd rest your hand).
 

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I had been in the market for an Accord for 3 years, but would not buy an 8th Gen because of the way it looked. And I much more interested in the mechanics of a car than its looks.

The 8th Gen however was just a conglomeration of mismatched styling cues to the point of distraction. I can't think of one exterior design feature that is better than acceptable.

And there are many that are clearly unacceptable. In fact I didn't buy one because I didn't want to be seen driving one.

So I continued driving my 2000 Accord until the 9th generation came along. Honda must have turned the styling over to a new group, because I find the 9th Gen very nice looking, and some aspects are downright beautiful, in a Honda sort of way.
 

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Well, to each his/her own.
I don't know about the interior or drivability or mechanics of the 8th gen. But I loooooved the exterior look of the 8th gen. I thought it looked the most different of all the Accords (and I mean that in a positive way); maybe less family car like. Even still today when I see it I'm like "damn, that car looks good as ish." I was actually looking to buy a used 8th gen (for price reasons), but uhhh things worked out different... and for the better.

I think the 8th gens (more specifically the first set with the short tail lights) are the second best looking Accords.

I don't see the similarities that others see with the 8th and 9th gens. I think the 9th gens are in an Accord world all it's own. Beast.
 

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I guess its down to personal preferences.

Personally, I took several test drives driving both the 8th gen, the 9th gen, and even a Mazda 6 to narrow it down to the two accords. Then on a subsequent back to back test drive, even though I liked both cars, I decided that the 2011 was the better car for me. The decision wasn't purely based on financial considerations either, as I could afford both comfortably. the 2011 felt like the better car to me vs. 2013 after the test drive. Simple as that.

Now, are there areas that the 9th g does better? Absolutely! For one I agree with most everyone that the exterior styling is better. The interior is also much cleaner looking than the 8th gen. Then there's also better fuel economy and the smaller overall size of the car (a plus to me).

To me, the only thing that still kind of bothers me about the 8th g is its initial build quality. Im currently a bit concerned with the potential issues withe my 8th g, which I found out after I bought my car... There also seemed to be a lot more problems with the 8th g than the 13 in their first couple of model years. Now, so far I'm still enjoying my 8th gen overall and happy with my decision, but whether that continues to be the case remains to be seen.
 

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I don't really understand where all of the 8th gen hate comes from, at least from a styling standpoint. In the realm of family sedans, it's not as attractive as the new Mazda 6, Kia Optima or even the new Ford Fusion, but calling it ugly is more than a bit harsh. Bland and inoffensive? Definitely, especially compared to the Optima/Sonata, 6, and Fusion. Ugly? No way, as it's too plain-Jane to evoke such a hateful response. The only thing I can think of that I would personally categorize as ugly in a modern-day sedan is the Acura plenum grille as used on the 2009-2011 TL. Now that thing is offensive. The 8G Accord sedan is too sedate to create such strong feelings. I actually think that, as a whole, it's a pleasant-looking car. I'm not going to call it beautiful by any means, but it does have a few nice angles to it. The main complaints I have about it are the oversized headlamps, bland tail section (especially on pre-MMC models), and lack of integrated fog lamps on 4-cylinder models (the lower part of the front bumper looks so barren without them). Other than those few things, I think it's

I honestly wish that I could just have the 7th gen's interior in a 9th's body. The 7th gen had the most comfortable seats and the best interior design and atmosphere in an Accord since the 5th gen, IMHO. Sitting in the 6th gen felt like sitting in a minivan, as the dash was low and long and you sat up really high in the interior. The 7th gen maintained the seat height of the 6th gen, but brought the dashboard upwards to eliminate that minivan feel while maintaining excellent visibility. The 8th gen is similar in terms of dashboard height, but I feel closer to the windshield and I can see the hood of the car clearly from the driver's seat. I couldn't see the hood at all in the 7th gen, or even the 6th gen. I don't like it. It also feels as if they pushed the front seats outward too much and too close to the door panels. I felt nicely centered in the left half of the 7th gen's interior while I feel as if I'm being pushed into the door panel in the 8th gen. As a result, the A pillar seems to be a lot more up-close-and-personal than it was in the 7th gen, where it wasn't in my direct line of sight as much. I don't understand why they would purposely move the front seats further from the center of the car, unless they just wanted to brag about how much extra space is between the front seats compared to the 7th gen (and they actually did brag about that when the car came out...LOL). After all, it's not like they gave it a bench seat option for the front, though they probably could have given the sheer width of the car and the fact that the front seating area is wider than the rear seat area by a good margin (look at the shoulder and hip room measurements of the front seat versus the rear, the difference is huge, roughly 2 inches in both measures). Imagine that, the 8th gen could've been the first 6-passenger Accord. It was classified as a Large car by the EPA, after all.

Unfortunately for me, the 9th gen continues the layout and feel of the 8th gen, only the reduced front headroom now has my hair touching the headliner :thumbsdow It's too bad Honda can't just remake the 7th gen with all of the updated safety and convenience features of the 9th gen. Call it the Accord Classic :tongue:

As far as driving dynamics, I can't comment on the 9th gen as I still haven't driven it, but I can compare the 6th, 7th, and 8th gens. The 6th gen (I had an '02 EX V6) had good steering feel but was let down by wimpy tires and a suspension that allowed lots of body roll yet was still firm enough to create a somewhat coarse ride (though those wimpy 205/65 tires surely helped muffle some of the harshness). Still, it would hang on fairly well in curves despite throwing me around with all of that body roll. The 7th gen (2007 V6) felt like a tightened-up version of the 6th gen. Its ride quality was definitely firmer and it demonstrated less body roll, but it also lost some of the 6th gen's direct steering feel in exchange for a more refined and isolated quality that was more akin to my 2000 Passat than the 6th gen. Ultimately, the 7th gen really didn't handle much, if any, better than the 6th gen. Cornering speeds were about the same, but the 7th gen just felt more solid and composed overall. The 8th gen is a relative mixed bag, as it somehow manages to out-handle its predecessors but feel totally awkward while doing so. Body roll has been reduced, but you're always aware of the car's size and heft in corners. The 6G and 7G always managed to feel smaller and lighter than they were, and would seem to shrink around me. Not this thing. It feels a lot less graceful than it actually is. Speaking of that, it's almost shocking how tossable the car is despite its girth. I find myself throwing it into corners with more confidence than I ever had in my previous Accords despite being ever-aware of the car's size. It feels planted and secure, which may even be attributable to that sense of size and weight. That said, I believe the biggest flaw in the 8th gen's handling is its overly-light and relatively numb steering. The path accuracy previous Accords were renowned for is still there, but the road feel has been diluted to the point where it's almost nonexistent. You can barely feel what's going on at the contact patches compared to previous generations (though I'm sure it's still among the best in the realm of affordable family cars). So, while the car has decent handling, the relatively lifeless steering and inability to mask its mass make it feel extremely uncomfortable with being pushed. The relative athleticism of past Accords is still there, it's just buried beneath a layer of isolation, a layer of fat, so to speak. It's as if the Accord itself has progressed into middle-age. As I said before, I've yet to drive a 9th gen, but I'm not expecting it to be much different. After all, it's still a midsize family sedan pointed the same target demographic it has been for years. It doesn't sound as if the steering is any better, but if the car goes back to feeling as light as the 7th gen did while maintaining the 8th gen's tossability, I'll be happy.
I agree with you on several points: The seat in the 7th gen is absolutely the most comfy of all! It's so nice that I had almost felt asleep in it a few times. The 7th g also has the best steering feel IMO, though the newer accords do appear to handle better based on numbers on paper. Man, I sometimes really miss my 7th g.:(

The 8th g, while being the least attractive looking of all three, does have elegant lines from some angles. To me, they only needed to add projectors, led tails, and replace amber side markers with a darker color (impossible due to dot regulations), then you'd have a nice looking accord. Have you seen an Asian market 8th g? That's a beauty right there.
 
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