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Don't laugh please :blush: So my last 535i and this V6 are the only automatics ive ever had. In the UK you buy an auto if you bought something ultra lux, ultra big, or have a disability. Its really uncommon for the average guy to drive an auto. So since I got here (USA) when I get to lights 50% of the time i stick my car in neutral, as though I was dipping the clutch; but my American wife is pretty adamant I'm insane and I should just leave it in drive with my foot on the brake.

Im pretty sure she's entirely correct as she was taught to drive an auto and I was taught to drive a manual but I was just curious. Is there any reason pro's or con's to either theory?

It feels like putting it in neutral ever light may cause wear on engaging and disengaging gears but then leaving it in drive with your foot on the brake also seems like it would cause wear on something. :dunno:

Apologies for dumb question of the year.
 

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Not that bad. An old gf of mine ONLY drove manuals....never an automatic. I actually had to "teach" her how to drive an auto.

At a stop, leave it in Drive. Just hold the brake.
You have to hold the brake anyways on a hill when in neutral.
This day and age, the engine and tranny can take the little bit extra abuse from leaving it in drive.
 

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Don't laugh please :blush: So my last 535i and this V6 are the only automatics ive ever had. In the UK you buy an auto if you bought something ultra lux, ultra big, or have a disability. Its really uncommon for the average guy to drive an auto. So since I got here (USA) when I get to lights 50% of the time i stick my car in neutral, as though I was dipping the clutch; but my American wife is pretty adamant I'm insane and I should just leave it in drive with my foot on the brake.

Im pretty sure she's entirely correct as she was taught to drive an auto and I was taught to drive a manual but I was just curious. Is there any reason pro's or con's to either theory?

It feels like putting it in neutral ever light may cause wear on engaging and disengaging gears but then leaving it in drive with your foot on the brake also seems like it would cause wear on something. :dunno:

Apologies for dumb question of the year.
In automatics that use torque converters('clutch') that is not an issue. The way torque converters work is that they have impellers on the inside and use this liquid energy to transfer engine mechanical energy to the drivetrain. I suggest you watch this from EricTheCarGuy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So im actually doing more damage shifting to neutral and back to drive than I am just sitting on the brake.

Fyi torque converters liquid stuff blew my mind. You make me understand what people feel like when I talk to them about tech.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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In theory, shifting into neutral should save gas. I do this at the intersections where I know I will be waiting for a couple of minutes. Very little fuel is used when engine is simply idling, but in Drive, the torque converter's hydraulic system is still pushing the car forward. Only the brakes prevent the car from rolling. This should not cause wear, but this certainly wastes some gas. I really admire how true hybrid cars handle this situation. When the car is not moving, the gas engine is usually turned off. When you step on gas, the electric engine powers the car, and then at a certain speed the gas engine turns on. A lot of non-hybrid cars now have this automatic start stop system that automatically shuts down the engine when the car stops, and fires the engine when you release brake. This is often not as smooth as in a hybrid.
 

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So im actually doing more damage shifting to neutral and back to drive than I am just sitting on the brake.
Yes. You are wearing out the shift lever a little quicker and there is a risk of high RPM before your transmission is engaged (although a common trick by teenager to peel out the wheels when your car is very under powered or something you do to a rental car). Since you will be trading this car in two years for a true English sports car (Bentley), I don't think it matters that much.
 

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Whenever I travel to the UK and rent a car I always get an automatic. Driving on the wrong side of the road from the wrong side of the car while shifting with the wrong hand is to many wrong things. :D

The small amount of fuel you are saving buy selecting neutral and then back to drive puts unnecessary wear on the transmission solenoids. When you select park, drive, reverse or sport the lever in the car is not mechanically connected to the transmission. You are electrically energizing solenoids through switches in the switch lever. I can remember that Chrysler and American Motors had push button selectors on their cars in the late 1950s instead of a gear selector handle. Replacing a bad solenoid requires that you remove and open up the transmission. A transmission solenoid went bad on my wife's 96 Nissan Quest van and it was a $1,200 repair bill.

Welcome to the US where, thank goodness we don't have a million dangerous roundabouts that go the wrong way. :banana:
 

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I put mine in neutral because of the vibrations I experience while stopped in drive.

The 1988 accord we have has been thrown into neutral at every red for the past 25 years. 218 k miles later, still running on the original trans with only scheduled maintenance.

I am aware that the cvt and 4 spd auto are different but just my 0.02
 

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I put mine in neutral because of the vibrations I experience while stopped in drive.

The 1988 accord we have has been thrown into neutral at every red for the past 25 years. 218 k miles later, still running on the original trans with only scheduled maintenance.

I am aware that the cvt and 4 spd auto are different but just my 0.02
I have never had a transmission vibrate while in drive with my foot on the brake. I think your car has a problem. This is the same kind of discussion as, should I down shift using engine braking when approaching a stop or just use my brakes? My take is that it's cheaper to replace brake pads than to repair the transmission, automatic or manual.
 

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I have never had a transmission vibrate while in drive with my foot on the brake. I think your car has a problem. This is the same kind of discussion as, should I down shift using engine braking when approaching a stop or just use my brakes? My take is that it's cheaper to replace brake pads than to repair the transmission, automatic or manual.


My 07 auto and 13 CVT both has vibration while in drive. It is not vibrate like crazy but you can feel the extra vibration than when it is on Neutral. It is like the degree of you turn on the AC and you feel the alternator is running.
 

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Not that bad. An old gf of mine ONLY drove manuals....never an automatic. I actually had to "teach" her how to drive an auto.
Can't believe you turned her to the dark side. :)
 

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I put mine in neutral because of the vibrations I experience while stopped in drive.

The 1988 accord we have has been thrown into neutral at every red for the past 25 years. 218 k miles later, still running on the original trans with only scheduled maintenance.

I am aware that the cvt and 4 spd auto are different but just my 0.02


I have never had a transmission vibrate while in drive with my foot on the brake. I think your car has a problem. This is the same kind of discussion as, should I down shift using engine braking when approaching a stop or just use my brakes? My take is that it's cheaper to replace brake pads than to repair the transmission, automatic or manual.
I used to put my cousins 92 Accord in Neutral at lights too. It would vibrate in drive at idle. My friends 2006 Civic was the same way. My 2013 does not do it, but it is a stick. The "In-Drive-idling" vibration was a big concern for me going into a Honda.

I've ridden in other Hondas that were the same way.

Jay
 

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Can't believe you turned her to the dark side. :)
Taught wife how to drive standard, but after 20 years of rowing in traffic here in NYC, we got our '03AccordEXLV6. Our '13 has no vibrations at lights, very quiet.... Love the 6 speed automatic...:thmsup:
 

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My 07 auto and 13 CVT both has vibration while in drive. It is not vibrate like crazy but you can feel the extra vibration than when it is on Neutral. It is like the degree of you turn on the AC and you feel the alternator is running.
I have never noticed that little amount of vibration. I will pay closer attention on my way home tonight. However, maybe you are being a little too picky. I used to fly jet airplanes, turbine engines, and they have a very tiny amount of vibration that you can feel if you pay attention. Your car has a reciprocating engine which has a larger amount of vibration at idle that may be transmitted to the transmission. If you feel better moving the gear selector handle to neutral when stopped, then enjoy yourself.
 

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I have never noticed that little amount of vibration. I will pay closer attention on my way home tonight. However, maybe you are being a little too picky. I used to fly jet airplanes, turbine engines, and they have a very tiny amount of vibration that you can feel if you pay attention. Your car has a reciprocating engine which has a larger amount of vibration at idle that may be transmitted to the transmission. If you feel better moving the gear selector handle to neutral when stopped, then enjoy yourself.
It's not the transmission itself that is vibrating. It's the load the torque converter is placing on the engine that is making the engine vibrate. Honda had had issues with this. They even developed special engine mounts in the 90s to combat this. They would get harder and softer based on engine RPM.

The 92 was so bad that the steering wheel shook when I would remove my hand. Vibration in drive at a stop has been a know problem with Hondas for 25+ years.

Jay
 

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Re: fuel savings....I think the opposite is true, because neutral revs higher than the car would otherwise in D. Either way, it's probably less than .05 gallons / hr difference. Cars don't use much fuel idling.
 

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It's not the transmission itself that is vibrating. It's the load the torque converter is placing on the engine that is making the engine vibrate. Honda had had issues with this. They even developed special engine mounts in the 90s to combat this. They would get harder and softer based on engine RPM.

The 92 was so bad that the steering wheel shook when I would remove my hand. Vibration in drive at a stop has been a know problem with Hondas for 25+ years.

Jay
I have never personally had this problem on any Honda I have owned. The CVT in my 9th generation is as smooth as silk as well as the non CVT automatics in my 2000 Accord V6 and my wife's 07 Fit.
 

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Whenever I travel to the UK and rent a car I always get an automatic. Driving on the wrong side of the road from the wrong side of the car while shifting with the wrong hand is to many wrong things. :D

The small amount of fuel you are saving buy selecting neutral and then back to drive puts unnecessary wear on the transmission solenoids. When you select park, drive, reverse or sport the lever in the car is not mechanically connected to the transmission. You are electrically energizing solenoids through switches in the switch lever. I can remember that Chrysler and American Motors had push button selectors on their cars in the late 1950s instead of a gear selector handle. Replacing a bad solenoid requires that you remove and open up the transmission. A transmission solenoid went bad on my wife's 96 Nissan Quest van and it was a $1,200 repair bill.

Welcome to the US where, thank goodness we don't have a million dangerous roundabouts that go the wrong way. :banana:
Yes! I tried driving my cousins little 1.0 banger with a stick... Do you realize how hard it is to train your brain to not only shift with the wrong hand, but to also move the stick the opposite way.

... and they are called Roondaboots

Dam us lazy Americans.... Why cant we all have sticks! I have to pull a brick of gold out of my arz to have someone give me a V6 6MT.
 

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I have never personally had this problem on any Honda I have owned. The CVT in my 9th generation is as smooth as silk ...
Well I'm glad yours is fine. My engine feels really rough when idling when it's cold. Once it warms up, I can't tell it's even running.

I also have the sensation the trans is slipping when accelerating with the engine cold. And the lights dim when I'm parking or moving out of a space and turning the wheel. I am going to mention these at my first oil change of course, I'm just venting lol :banana:
 

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I have never personally had this problem on any Honda I have owned. The CVT in my 9th generation is as smooth as silk as well as the non CVT automatics in my 2000 Accord V6 and my wife's 07 Fit.
You may just be used to it as you have been driving Hondas for a very long time. I have driven mostly V8s all my life up until now and they for the msot part idle pretty smooth. I would have bought Hondas much sooner than this had the idle quality been better. I just could not take the vibrations at stop lights.

Jay
 
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